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Newly diagnosed 13yr old at risk of failing classes

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Dxdiabetic13, May 12, 2016.

  1. Dxdiabetic13

    Dxdiabetic13 Approved members

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    My son was just diagnosed T1 about 3 weeks ago and missed 1 week of school. He's been really struggling this year to keep his grades up and now I see why he was having such a hard time staying motivated and remembering to turn his work in. Now he's dealing with a huge life changing event that drains him on all levels. My concern is that he has 2 weeks left of school and a ton of makeup work and is at risk of possibly failing 2 classes. Does anyone have any advice about talking with his teachers about not failing him? They're all aware of his new diagnosis and I want to make sure that he passes. I'm so overwhelmed and so is he to then add the possibility of not passing classes to this huge life adjustment is just to much. He's a really smart kid but has been struggling with remembering to turn in his work for the past six months and it's been because he was sick. Help please, any advice?
     
  2. sarahspins

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    Have you talked to the school about ways to make up those grades? Credit recovery (aka summer school) may be an option if he needs it. In my disctrict it's self-paced and not at all like typical summer school, and kids end up needing it for a variety of reasons. If he was struggling due to his undiagnosed diabetes I am sure there are options for him.
     
  3. Christopher

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    Sorry you are dealing with this. I may be in the minority here but I would be very careful about using his Type 1 as an "excuse". Yes, he may have not been feeling good prior to being diagnosed, but there is no way to know how much of a factor that was in him not remembering to turn in his work. How do you even know how long he was dealing with high bg? Maybe it was only a month or so? You don't say how old he is but I am not sure how having high blood sugar would cause him to forget to turn in his work. So are you saying he actually did all the required work but just didn't turn it in? I guess I don't have the whole story here.

    Each parent (and child) handles this disease differently and as we continue to live with this illness our approach changes over time. I have always tried very hard to not use (or let her use) her Type 1 diabetes as an excuse. Of course in the beginning, you are still navigating things and the early days are VERY tough. I do understand that. I just would not want to set a precedence that his illness is something that holds him back or prevents him from doing things, or that people should treat him differently because of it. We always say that our kids with Type 1 diabetes can do anything any other kid can do, so there are two sides to that statement.
    But it is a fine line of wanting them to be treated like everyone else but at the same time taking their illness into consideration (one example would be standardized testing). So I do feel for what you are going through.

    I do hope things work out for you in this situation. Good Luck!!!
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2016
  4. Dxdiabetic13

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    Thank you for the input. Yes he would do the assignment and forget to turn them in. Before he was hospitalized he had all A'small and B's. Now he's got C'she and D's. I know logically that he can't use his T1 as a get out of jail and thank you for the reminder. I just see him struggling with the reality of being a diabetic and I want to take away all his heart ache. The reality is that I can't and the more I realize that this is manageable the better it will be for him and myself. He has gone to his teachers and has gotten his missing work done so I'm not as concerned about him failing. It's funny how much anxiety I feel from one moment to the next. I'm so grateful for everyone who has gone through this process before me and know that I have a resource to help. Wish I had found this forum earlier but every thing happens for a reason.
     
  5. Christopher

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    As I said before, the early days are very tough and as you are finding out, it is also an emotional roller coaster. But there are tons of examples on this site that you can find of kids who are productive, happy, successful, and thriving. There are also examples of young adults who are going off to college and doing a great job of managing their Type 1 diabetes successfully. So for those times when you are feeling overwhelmed or sad or depressed try and think of the examples of those kids and know that your son will be fine.
     
  6. coni

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    Hi - I'm really glad your son managed to get caught up on his assignments and you're no longer worried about him failing school. I agree that diabetes shouldn't be used as an excuse, but it is quite possible it affected his ability to learn and manage school. I thought my daughter had a learning disability, and she was receiving speech therapy. Once she was diagnosed and on insulin, the problems cleared up in a few weeks. It was amazing.

    Please take care of yourself. A new diagnosis is hard on everyone. Maybe the summer can be an opportunity to adjust before school starts again. If you're in the U.S., look into getting a 504 plan in place for school next year. That way, if there are diabetes related issues in school, you and the school will have a plan on how to deal with them.
     
  7. Dxdiabetic13

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    Thanks for all the support and info. He passed!!!! I am definitely going to be getting a 504 plan. His father doesn't feel it's necessary (he teaches at the high school in my son's school district) but we had a meeting with CHLA social worker yesterday and she stressed the importance of having a 504 plan even if it never has to be brought up and enforced. I'm so grateful for the support I'm getting. Thank you all.
     

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