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Newbie introduction

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by triumph957, Jul 22, 2014.

  1. triumph957

    triumph957 New Member

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    Hello, this is my first post so I figured I'd introduce myself. I'm a father of five wonderful kids, twin 13 year old one of which has t1, 10 year old daughter, son 6 and daughter 4.
    My son was diagnosed last May. Six months into finding out he hit puberty. Wow is this every a crazy ride. My wife is dealing with this better than me, but I'm the designated diabetes expert. Tonite is my turn to be sleepless again because he went high. Any advice would be great. Really thinking of getting a dexcom cgm. Any pros or cons? I just want us to learn his body, and how to do this right. Pardon my rambling.
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

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    Welcome! My daughter was diagnosed at 11, and puberty began about six months later, hit with full furry at a year. Now her growth has slowed tremendously, and while it's not easy, her insulin needs are more stable.

    Dexcom.....YES! Within a few hours, you'll wonder how you managed without the thing. You'll still be up a lot, but the sleep in between is much higher quality.

    My daughter wears hers 24/7, and it is so useful for letting us know what is happening, to go proactive as we see basals start to change rather than just reactive and attempting to bust through nasty highs. It gives the kids SO MUCH MORE independence with us & them feeling confident.
     
  3. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    I second what MomofSweetOne said RE the Dexcom. I doubt that you'd be able to find any parents on this Forum who would not agree that the Dexcom is a game-changer.

    By the way, welcome to the Forum and I wish you the best!
     
  4. BarbDwyer

    BarbDwyer Approved members

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    Hi. I'm new (very new) and just replying because I have a 13yo boy too - not because I know anything ;) He was diagnosed last month and puberty is looming large. It will hit soon I'm sure.

    When you stay up with him when he is high - how high is that? I never know if I'm doing the right thing or worry to much or to little.

    I'm also a member of the twins club. Mine are 8. I also have a 15yo.
     
  5. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    On the G4 question, if I had to relive the past 12 years with Type 1 and we had the technology of today back then I absolutely, without question would have wanted the G4 as our starter technology. 1. it's relatively small and inconspicuous. 2. it's a great tool to help see how insulin works, both for parent and kid, 3. it provides real time information that makes it safer and simpler for Type 1 kids to be more independent without compromising safety and 4. it makes the nights so much less stressful and I'm getting better sleep than I have in years. :cwds:
     
  6. Sioux

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    Sorry, very new, my 16 year old was diagnosed July 14th - what is a DEXCOM? Why should I be losing sleep? I don't mean to sound like an idiot, but I don't want to miss anything either. After the first few days Bren has been checking his BG before bed and when he gets up, isn't that enough at night? His BG is running from low 100's to mid-200's, but I was told that was normal when first diagnosed. If I should be more worried, let me know. Actually now I am more worried!
     
  7. sszyszkiewicz

    sszyszkiewicz Approved members

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    Sioux, sorry for the diagnosis.

    Many people check in the middle of the night to make sure their child is not low/hypoglycemic. There is a danger there you need to guard against particularly if they are very active that day.

    Dexcom is a continuous glucose monitor that provides an estimate as to what the blood sugar level is every 5 minutes. it has alarms for detected high and low values.

    did you participate in any training after diagnosis? You have to get up to speed. Things are now different for you. You have additional responsibilities.
     
  8. sszyszkiewicz

    sszyszkiewicz Approved members

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    Hi Barb. My son's name is also Luke! He is 12. Sorry for the diagnosis.

    At night we were taught to try and get our son's sugar level to around 150 for bedtime. So if he is low, he gets an uncovered snack (1 uncovered carb raises blood sugar levels by about 5 points). If he is high, we would give insulin, but it is tricky. If you are on injections you have less flexibility than those on pumps because of the precision (or lack thereof) using injections. At night you dont want to overcorrect a high because then they go low while asleep (not ideal/can be very dangerous). The amount of insulin you would give depends on your son's correction factor (among other things).
     
  9. Sioux

    Sioux Approved members

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    We have been to one session with the Nurse Educator. Brendon is on his mission trip (his Endo approved) and we meet with the Endo's nurse educator when he gets back. Thanks for the information. I will definitely read about the Dexcom!
     
  10. BarbDwyer

    BarbDwyer Approved members

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    He does injections. We have never corrected at any time other than at meal time and we just automatically do the formula we were given. Maybe they will teach that at our next appointment or when he starts getting more high numbers. If we were told to get his level up to 150 before bed I do not remember that. I might try that the rest of this week since he does go low at night sometimes. I'm more nerved up about it than ever because he goes to spend two weeks with his dad soon and they will probably be more active and camping and such.
     
  11. Christopher

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    Is his father involved in his care? Has he been trained?
     
  12. sszyszkiewicz

    sszyszkiewicz Approved members

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    Hey Sioux that's great. Learn as much as you can. Christopher often publishes a list of great books, but for brand new diagnosed, "The pink Panther Book" is perfect.

    http://www.amazon.com/First-Book-Un...sr=1-4&keywords=pink+panther+book+on+diabetes
     
  13. sszyszkiewicz

    sszyszkiewicz Approved members

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    Hey BarbDwyer it sounds like you are off to a great start! Be careful with insulin outside in the sun. It will go bad if it gets too hot. It will also go bad if it accidentally freezes in a cooler. I think its great that you guys will do all of that fun stuff, but it takes more planning than usual when planning trips with T1D. so think about what you will need for his diabetes supplies, bring backups, and backups to your backups.
     
  14. triumph957

    triumph957 New Member

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    Spoke to the doctors office today. Getting set up with a dexcom asap. My wife does an awesome job during the day with all the kids and for the last year adapting to all the changes. The whole family has been great at changing our diet. The funny thing was that we had things somewhat under control, soccer seems to help him a lot. Then puberty hit Wow. I'm really hoping this comes through quick. I guess the best thing that's happened its that my family has gotten so much stronger and closer, now if I can get some sleep it would be better.
     
  15. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    How low at night?

    Did they give you any training on how insulin works? when it peaks? when lows are most likely to be dangerous? I have to say "automatically do the formal that was given" in a likely soon honeymooning kid rather scares the $hit out of me. The did explain how dangerous too much or badly timed insulin can be, right??
     
  16. Sioux

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  17. sszyszkiewicz

    sszyszkiewicz Approved members

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    Triumph, the Dex will help tremendously. I don't know if the amount of sleep you get will improve, but the quality of sleep will. I hear you about soccer. It is also heartening to hear about the closeness. We have not hit that puberty wall here, though I see hints of it now in the traces, but it is not something I am looking forward to but I realize it is inevitable.
     
  18. BarbDwyer

    BarbDwyer Approved members

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    He's not involved at all which is why I'm nerved up. I have sent him a lot of information and requested that he talk to a pediatric diabetic educator there (or call here). I have spent a lot of time talking to my older two kids about the most important things (also because they are home while I work). It is not an ideal situation but I can't change it.

    Good to know on the hot/cold. Will they be able to tell if it goes bad? Will it hurt him or just not work? I am making a list and sending extra of everything along with index cards for quick reference. I can almost feel them rolling their eyes already. ;)

    Wow - so wonderful that you guys work together so well and become stronger and closer. I watched a video yesterday that said the primary factor associated with a child's A1C level is how supported the mother felt.

    A little bit. I've read most of that kind of thing (peaks) - they gave us the Pink Panther book. They trained us what to do when he became low and how serious they were etc.. I did have to call and get the formula readjusted and that lantus dose changed and each time I call she gives me a little more information about how she came to the 'new' numbers so I can do it more on my own. She said at night anything below 100 was considered low. Last night was 87 which I count as a huge victory because he had a pool party from 9-11pm and he started it low at 65. I'm not sure why he was low other than he mowed the backyard earlier and even though we adjusted for that - apparently did not adjust enough and he also had a small supper. He had 55 uncovered carbs (gummies and a pop) between 8:45 and 10:13pm, at which time he tested at 127 and had a bunch of food which we gave a tiny bit of insulin for. Was 127 at 11:38 when he did his lantus. 87 at 1:14am so had some milk, 125 at 4am and 109 this morning at breakfast. I'm rambling. Sorry, lol. I think one of the hardest things for me has been that there is no one to talk over a decision with or go over things with.

    The short answer is that his lows are usually between 60-70 with a random one between 50-60 here and there. I think he was 48 once since diagnosis and we have adjusted the lantus since then and I took it down one more point. It is 13 now, he started at 22. His novolog was 1:12 and now it is 1:20 unless he has something planned we change it to 1:25.
     
  19. Christopher

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    I would be nervous too if I were you. Communication is going to be very important to make sure your son is safe and his diabetes is managed properly. Hopefully he realizes how important this is and takes it seriously.
     
  20. MomofSweetOne

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    You have good reason to be worried. Activity can cause lows HOURS later (even the next day), and it is very important to check BGs after an active day. If I would were, I would call your team tomorrow to ask about starting the process for a Dexcom...or call Dexcom and let them carry the process.

    My daughter is at non-D camp, and she called home to update me on how things were going. Last night she forgot about D'oh (Delayed Onset Hypoglycemia). I'm not sure whether that meant she forgot a mixed carb bedtime snack without a bolus or if she forgot to do a temp basal, but the wonderful CNAs were up with her 5 times for lows. That's 75 carbs she needed...because of zip-lining before bed.
     

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