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New Study To Be Released

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by SueM, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. Christopher

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    Sorry, I thought I was clear.

    No, I agree that the health of the mother can absolutely effect the health of the fetus. What I don't agree with is that being obese while pregnant can increase the chance of the child getting T1 diabetes. To me it just smacks of the old stereotype between weight and diabetes. And clearly I would need to see the actual study to see what kind of rigor it was conducted under.
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

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    Yeah, I think you're way off base. It is entirely possible to be thin and unhealthy or fat and healthy.
     
  3. caspi

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    Quite frankly, I consider this to be a "non-event" until the study is actually released and can be reviewed. No one has any idea what the study is, who performed it, etc.

    Just my two cents........ ;)
     
  4. MamaC

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    Personally, I'd like to see a study regarding the impact of having a CWD on the health of the mother. I was damn skinny six years ago. Now...not so much.
     
  5. Lee

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    People study and research everything under the sun. They are simply testing a hypothesis.

    Personally, I want a study on how the taste of a snickers bar declines with the number eaten and whether or not that is linked with hair color or boob size.
     
  6. Mish

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    You can't know where you're going until you know where you've been.

    How can anyone find a cure until they unlock the mysteries to why we get diabetes in the first place?
     
  7. Mish

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    You know this how?
     
  8. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    A much higher risk? How much higher are we talking?
    Hypothyroidism and type 1 diabetes are linked; I'm sure many of you have noticed how many of the mothers on here have Hashimoto's and the overall risk of hypothyroidism for parents of type 1 diabetics vs the general population is more than twice as high. I would expect a higher portion of people who have mild and undiagnosed hypothyroidism to be overweight as compared to other people. That would of course only explain a very small increase in risk.
    I guess my point is that correlation is not causation.
     
  9. purplewowies

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    Exactly what I was going to say.
     
  10. mmgirls

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    Ok so how many snickers do I need to eat to increase my boob size?
     
  11. swellman

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    The problem is that it's not a targeted response.
     
  12. Mish

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    I'm still waiting for an answer.

    Why are we evening debating a study that hasn't been released? It could say something entirely different, or, not even exist.
     
  13. hawkeyegirl

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    *snort*

    Exactly.
     
  14. momtojess

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    I will participate in that study!! LOL
     
  15. Heather(CA)

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    Since your above statement is in fact true...How is the study helpful? :confused:
     
  16. Heather(CA)

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    Since there are a lot of thin and not as thin people who's kids are dx'd. I don't see the point in having a study about it. I think that Endo issues in general are in the genes and run in famlies, it takes two parents with the gene so it can skip many generations. Most if not all famlies have a least something their family deals with...Cancer, Endo issues, alcoholism, Heart problemms, Alzheimers etc....Find a cure.
     
  17. emm142

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    Well, imagine that my child has a 5% risk of type 1 because I have D (not sure if that's the exact number). If I found out that my child would have a 7% risk if I were obese and a 3% risk if I were not, I'd obviously try to avoid obesity whilst pregnant (even more than I otherwise would).

    Additionally, this could help research for a cure. If there is a correlation between obese mothers and T1 children, why? Is there a causal relationship somewhere? Could that tell scientists something about why the autoimmune process starts in the first place? And once they know why it starts, could they figure out how to prevent/halt/reverse it?

    IMO this type of study is important. I'm not going to bother debating the exact study until I know whether or not it is real. ;)
     
  18. hawkeyegirl

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    Exactly. How COULDN'T it be helpful to know that particular things increase or decrease one's risk of having a type 1 child? If you knew that eating ice cream during pregnancy doubled your risk of having a child with T1, wouldn't that be relevant information for you to have? Even if it was possible to still eat ice cream and not have a T1 child? I realize that it's too late for this information to help you or me, as we are both presumably done bearing children, but it certainly could help other people (including our children if they choose to have kids someday).

    Emma's second paragraph is spot on as well. This is all part of a puzzle, and it's likely that the causes of T1 bear some relationship to possible cures of T1. A lot of cure research is a lot more subtle and incremental than "Take this pill. See if your diabetes goes away."
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012
  19. Mish

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    yes yes. Totally.

    think about this. Long before we knew that drinking during pregnancy caused all sorts of fetal alcohol issues, woman drank. Some babies were fine, some were not. The research probably started with a long list of things that each of these babies had in common until they pinpointed what was the common cause. At the time all they knew was that some babies were born with disturbing issues.

    With diabetes the secrets are a little harder to understand than the example I gave but it's the same process. The beginning questions are always the same. Why? and How?

    What I see now is that researchers are trying to find the common cause(s) and then they'll begin to explore each one. If they find that there is some link to obesity and type 1 it may not be the obesity itself that is the ultimate link. They'll take that knowledge and explore different avenues: How does obesity change things on a cellular level? Does anything else other than obesity change things in the same way? Should those things be explored? Answers are found in the oddest places.

    But you cannot cure anything until you know what has caused it. Researchers looking for a cure aren't doing so in a vacuum. The therapies and medicines they are exploring are all based on studies like this, seemingly random and insignificant studies, based on someone's hypothesis.

    That's sort of how science works.
     
  20. Lee

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    So, it isn't important to study possible causes of these disease? For example, if I know I run an increased risk of heart disease due to a study that confirmed a correlation between being blond and heart disease, I might look more closely at other steps I could take to control my heart health, other then dying my hair brown.

    Yes- fat people and skinny people have kids with T1. All this study is trying to do is see if there is an increased risk. It is just a study, just some researchers sitting around throwing out paper ideas. The researcher is supposed to be unbiased, so they should not care if the correlation is found or not.

    Studies that search to find correlations are important to tracking down the cause of disease, or even vaccination side effects. These studies inform us on things we should pay closer attention to, or as I suspect in this study, things that we should not have to worry about.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science_studies

    And for some far weirder ones:
    http://listverse.com/2009/06/02/10-truly-bizarre-scientific-studies/
     

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