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New Study Shows Infant Formula Linked to Childhood Diabetes

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by Alex's Dad, Jun 22, 2011.

  1. denise3099

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    If it turns out that milk or formula or gluten or whatever is linked to D, I wnt to know it. I don't care if I did "cause" my child's D, since I could only work with the information I had at the time. That's no reason to stick my head in the sand now. Besides, it may be to late for my daughter to prevent D, but what about my grandbabies?!? Some day my beautiful daughter will have beautiful babies and I don't want them to have D. I can't prevent my daughter being a cwd, but maybe I we can prevent her from being a parent of a cwd. Bring on all the info you've got! Thanks for posting. :)
     
  2. emm142

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    I agree, although obviously from a different perspective. :)

    Personally I was breastfed and never liked cow's milk as a kid. But if there is anything at all that I can do to make my kids less likely to develop D (without significantly impacting on other aspects of their life or health), I plan to do it.

    Nobody can be blamed for doing something "wrong" before people even knew or suspected the dangers of it!

    Thanks for posting the article, Rene. Some bits seemed odd, but I like to read everything I can, whether I agree with it or think it's complete rubbish.. you can't make your mind up until you've had a look. :)

    The thing I wondered about was: "By age five, the signs of diabetes in those children had decreased by 50 percent in comparison to children who moved from breastfeeding directly to foods such as cereals, fruit, or other types of formula." What exactly do you think it means by signs of diabetes? Either you have diabetes or you don't... Unless it's talking about antibodies?
     
  3. swellman

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    Although I realize that our one anecdote is meaningless I can't help but remembering all those cans of Gerber infant cereal. In fact, I still use them to hold my various teas.

    I suspect we will find that something in this study will lead to a better understanding of some of the ( in my opinion ) several causes of the disease. Keep in mind that half the children were still affected. So, whatever they conclude it will only be a part of the puzzle.
     
  4. nanhsot

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    If it helps you formula feeders feel any better, I exclusively breastfed for 10 months, then continued for another year after that in combo with food (AND...I made my own baby food, so I can't blame it on that either).

    We're not big cow's milk drinkers either, not one of those families that buy it by the jug and run to the store weekly to replace, use it in recipes and the rare bowl of cereal.

    I'm with Emma though, I find any study interesting and useful and if any little bit of information can help in the bigger puzzle that's great. If my son can avoid cow's milk for his kids and maybe prevent a trigger from happening, that's great. I'm of the opinion that cow's milk isn't particularly good for us anyway, so eliminating it wouldn't bother me. Cheese now...that's another story!
     
  5. HanksMom

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    I appreciate this statement, and the other poster who said that she is interested in research such as this, not to agonize over what caused her child's D, but for what we can learn from it to move forward.

    I believe that there are likely many environmental triggers of D, not just one answer, and while I don't want to be unhealthily obsessed with what triggered Hank's diabetes, I am very interested to glean what I can and learn what might be a trigger so that I can make informed decisions for our soon-to-be born child, and also so that as a population, we can progress and learn more and hopefully have fewer and fewer new diagnoses. If there is good reason to believe that highly hydrolyzed formula is a good choice, I'll choose it for my daughter. Does this mean that I believe that this is specifically what triggered Hank's diabetes, and will I resent that I switched from breast milk to formula at 4 or 5 months with him? No. Will I ask our pediatrician and our endo about it at our next appointments? Yes.
     
  6. selketine

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    I breastfed both my kids well past a year and they didn't have milk until after a year. They did start cereals around 6 months. There aren't a lot of parents out there that breastfed their kids more than me - and one has it and one doesn't. And William even got it at 26 months of age - so he was really little.

    Maybe what the mom eats while breastfeeding is also an issue? Who knows?

    I figure the triggers are complex and perhaps there are multiple ones - it could be that if the formula didn't get you that something else would have later anyway. I doubt there is a magic bullet but hopefully these sorts of studies might lead to some clues on what the triggers are.
     
  7. Faith

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    For what it's worth, I breastfed my son until 27 months when his symptoms really kicked in, he was diagnosed at 28 months. He never had a drop of formula and he only really ate tiny amounts of pureed vegetables from about eight months (he had horrendous reflux and eating was a big issue) He did have cows milk in his second year on cereal and was drinking it before diagnosis. He was breastfed longer than any of my others.
     
  8. Heather(CA)

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    Seth was breast fed for 10 months but he didn't get cows milk until 2 years.
     
  9. ShanaB

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    Emma was exclusively breastfed until the day she was diagnosed. Never drank formula or cows milk. I'm not convinced.
     
  10. swellman

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    For what it's worth when studies like this that come out that show a possible link between something it should not be assumed that anyone thinks it's THE cause. After all and if I understand the abstract, it only reduced the cases by 50% in the target group. I assume the control group still had a number of diagnoses. So, it shouldn't be at all surprising if there are many, many who don't fit the profile. It certainly doesn't invalidate the study's results.

    I think when, and if, they find causality then that would be really helpful.

    Also, it's entirely possible that the half that saw prevention to age 10 might still get diagnosed later in life - not that that's a bad thing.

    In the mean time if I were having another child I would have them evaluated for at risk and I would probably follow their protocol if possible.
     
  11. mom24grlz

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    Well Ashleigh exclusively BF until 6 months when she started rice cereal. We introduced cow's milk at 12 months, she continued to breastfeed until she self weaned at 3 years old. Hmm maybe that's why she wasn't diagnosed until 11 years. See if I would have weaned her sooner we would have gotten the diagnoses at an earlier age. Yeah i'm not convinced that formula feeding or breastfeeding causes diabetes.

    mom to 12 year old T1 daughter DX 3/23/10. Pumping animas ping.
     
  12. monkeyschool

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    I would love to know if you had cow's milk during the time Emma was BF.

    My DD was BF as well, but I had at least one glass of cow's milk each day at the doc's recommendation. I later learned (because of my son's reaction) that the protein in milk is passed down through breast milk. So while I personally can discount formula, I can't discount the cow's milk because I consumed it even though DD didn't until she was beyond 1 year. If you didn't consume it I guess it makes a clearer case for me on this one.

    I guess if the argument is made that cow's milk is the 'cause', then non-cow's milk formula babies would fare better that regular formula and also BF babies whose moms consume cow's milk.???

    ETA: the one thing that I wonder (and this is the mom of the recently dx kid typing this out) is about DD's lack of sun exposure. Mine was a gymnast dx after 2+ years of sitting in a gym 8-5:30 and coming home to do homework afterward rarely seeing the sun during the week. I've been seeing a lot of studies about Vitamin D and it does make me wonder (but obviously I know all the other gymnast in the same situation do not have D)
     
  13. Heather(CA)

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    I know your not asking me but...I did not drink milk while breastfeeding, It gives me sinus infections. Also neither of my boys (Both have Endo issues) had cows milk until they were two.:cwds:
     
  14. jules12

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    I am with others - if they can actually pin down something to avoid this disease and I am all for it. But I am not going to rehash my decisions that I made over 11 years ago. Both my kids had to be on formula - one has d the other doesn't. I think the fact that this disease is so diverse in how it affects each person differently, probably lends itself that the cause of this disease is diverse too.

    When he was first dx, these type of threads would pop up and I would wonder if I caused this by decisions I made, but then I realized that I couldn't/wouldn't have changed those knowing what I knew at the time. Vaccinations, BF, bottlefed, sunlight/vitamin d, - who knows...we all have different experiences with different variations...

    We all just have to make the best decisions we can with the info we have and move forward.
     
  15. Kaylas mom

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    I don't know, Kayla was on Alimentum (sp?) until 15 months.. Noah was on soy and they were both dx. Nick was on TPN (IV nutrition) and neocate until 2 then almond milk and rice milk until he was 4. I don't really believe the formula choices we made (or had to make for their health) can affect whether or not they will get D.
     
  16. CAGrandma

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    It's really important to distinguish between things that may cause or promote a disease and things that are correlated with one. Breastfeeding has been shown in a number of studies to decrease the statistical probability of a child having a number of illnesses (ear infections, diabetes). Doesn't prevent the disease. Not breastfeeding doesn't cause the disease. But it may improve the odds. There are so many things we have absolutely no control over that it would probably make sense to do those things we can have control over that improve the odds.
    And there is nothing more useless than feeling guilty over something long past that you can't do anything about. Guilt is supposed to help us learn from our mistakes so we don't repeat them.
     
  17. kgerrick

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    "Please don't feel that way, it was not my intention to make you or anybody feel bad, we are in the same boat, me and my wife question ourselves a lot after diagnosis and some days still do, but you know what, it was not our fault, and it was not your fault either it was nothing we did or didn't do.
    I'm deeply sorry this post came across the way it did, looks like I'm out of luck with this forum, that's why I barely post, just lurk. "



    Please don't stop posting things. This is all very interesting and very important to get closer to a cure.
     
  18. Hudson_Rocks

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    Unfortunately I had to use formula out of necessity; I so wanted to exclusively breastfeed my kids, I used to breastfeed my dolls when I was little, to me it was part and parcel of being a mother. When my oldest arrived, I tried and thought I was doing well, until the day came that we discovered brick-dust urine in his diaper, a sign of dehydration. He was still losing weight, and it was determined I did not produce adequate milk. I switched him to formula and that still hurts.

    Never one to give up, I was bound and determined that when Hudson was born, I would be successful. I tried so hard. Worked my butt off to learn everything I could before he was born, he was a VBAC (vaginal birth after Cesarean) baby -- I thought surely we could do it. Same story as with the oldest. I supplemented by giving formula with a syringe for the first few weeks and nursed all I could. I cried the first time I gave him a bottle because I thought that was the end of breastfeeding. Then I realized it was not an all or nothing, and I nursed AND bottle-fed him until he was 10 months old and I was pregnant with my 3rd.

    Repeat x2 for babies 3 & 4. Finally it was determined that I have inadequate breast tissue and simply cannot make enough milk, no matter what I try - oatmeal, pumping, fenugreek, Reglan, Mother's Milk Tea, etc. I didn't let it stop me though and Number 3 nursed until he was 2; #4 is still going strong at 13 months old. It truly doesn't have to be all or nothing.

    When Hudson was dxd, of course we went looking for reasons why, and the proteins in cows milk were one of the things we came across. Talk about guilt! And anger. Lots of anger. I was (am) already mad at my body for failing me and my kids in the milk production department. Sure we could have gone another way with formula but let's face it - it's expensive enough to buy formula, much less the "different" kinds available, and soy has its own reputation. So we decided that we don't want #4 to have cows milk as a regular thing, and have resisted transitioning him to it (the one time we tried he didn't like it). It's not necessary for health, we are the only species that drinks another species' milk on a regular basis for goodness' sake. He has liked coconut "milk" in the past, but rejected it last time I bought it. So in spite of our "no cow milk" hope he is on a toddler formula in addition to other liquids. We try to limit that....

    #1 was the only one who had any vaccinations beyond the Vitamin K at birth. They've all been raised in the same way, in the same house. No day care/sitters (beyond occasional family), we have cats, home & public schooling, etc etc etc. There's no family history, no rhyme or reason. But we will do whatever we can to limit our other kids' risks, and if that includes no or very little cow milk, then that is what it will be.
     
  19. monkeyschool

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    Thank you :)
     
  20. Beach bum

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    I agree. Maybe one day all these studies will find a missing piece of the puzzle.

    I formula fed both girls in BPA containing bottles (prior to problems being found with that). Didn't give them milk until well after a year. They are identical twins, one has D, one the markers. I'm lactose intolerant, so I drank rice milk while pregnant.
     

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