- advertisement -

New Airline Restricted List - Do not bring these things with you

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Ellen, Aug 10, 2006.

  1. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
    This is definitely going to make traveling more difficult. We always have juice or other liquids to drink on the plane or while waiting for the plane.

    Created: 8/10/2006 9:04:45 AM
    Updated: 8/10/2006 10:39:30 AM

    NEW AIRLINE RESTRICTIONS

    Liquids are banned from carry-on luggage and cannot be taken through security checkpoints:

    * Drinks even ones purchased at the airport
    * Toothpaste
    * Perfume
    * Shampoo
    * Hair gel
    * Suntan lotion and similar items

    Allowances:
    Baby formula and medications are permissible but must be presented for inspection at security checkpoints.

    Other traveling protocol:
    * All shoes must be removed and placed on an X-ray belt for screening.
    * Passengers are also asked to arrive at least two hours early to allow for additional screening.
    * Passengers traveling to the UK should contact their airline for information about any extra security measures or precautions that might be required. Laptop computers, mobile phones and iPods were among items banned on British flights.
     
  2. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    My husband and I were discussing this topic today. Luckily, we are not traveling by plane again until Dec. We were wondering if a note from a doctor would allow for emergency juice? Otherwise, glucose tabs are the only option as the gels and frosting in the tube wouldn't make the cut. We were also wondering about the pump, and how the cartridge could cause a potential problem? Or vials of insulin?

    If anyone is traveling in the next few weeks, please share your experiences. I'm very curious as to how this is being handled.

    And remember, bring a copy of the pump letter from your doctor, and a copy of the page from the pump book saying it shouldn't go through X-ray.

    DON'T TAKE THE PUMP OFF AND PUT IT THROUGH SECURITY!!!!
     
  3. lisamomtotwins

    lisamomtotwins Approved members

    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Messages:
    176
    Wow i guess they werent thinking about diabetics when they made this new "rule" ..... that is kinda scarry. we have never had a problem with DH pump when we were traveling, it did always set off the alarm but when he explained what is was they said ok. :dunno:
     
  4. Ben'sMommy

    Ben'sMommy Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2006
    Messages:
    582
    They will have to arrest me if they tell us we can't bring juice on board. Juice is the ONLY thing Ben will always take to treat a low.
    They'll just have to accept a letter from his ped endo or else they'll get a pretty nasty one from my solicitor.

    Gosh, I'd love to meet the people who come up with these 'rules'.

    This has really annoyed me.
     
  5. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
    More details:

    FOXNews.com - Terror Threat: New Security Measures at U.S., UK Airports - Transportation

    New Security Measures at U.S. Airports
    The Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security has determined that there is a high risk of terrorism against U.S. civil aviation, and the need for extra restrictions to assure the security of air travel. In order to address the higher risk, the Department of Homeland Security has implemented the following new security measures until further notice.
    No liquids or gels are permitted to enter the sterile area through the screening checkpoint or be in accessible property or on one’s person except:
    · Baby formula, breast milk, or juice if a baby or small child is traveling
    · Prescription medicine with a name that matches the passenger’s ticket
    · Insulin and essential other non-prescription medicines
    Examples of liquids and gels included in these security measures include:
    · Beverages
    · Shampoo
    · Suntan Lotion
    · Creams
    · Toothpaste
    · Hair Gel
    · Other items of similar consistency
    Also, you will not be allowed to bring any liquids or gels purchased after passing through the security checkpoint onboard the aircraft.


    New Security Requirements at UK Airports
    All cabin baggage must be processed as hold baggage and carried in the hold of passenger aircraft departing UK airports
    Passengers may only take the following items through the airport security search point, in a single (ideally transparent) plastic carrier bag:
    · Pocket size wallets and pocket size purses plus contents (for example money, credit cards, identity cards etc (not handbags))
    · Travel documents essential for the journey (for example passports and travel tickets)
    · Prescription medicines and medical items sufficient and essential for the flight (eg diabetic kit), except in liquid form unless verified as authentic
    · Spectacles and sunglasses, without cases
    · Contact lens holders, without bottles of solution
    · For those traveling with an infant: baby food, milk (the contents of each bottle must be tasted by the accompanying passenger) and sanitary items sufficient and essential for the flight (nappies, wipes, creams and nappy disposal bags)
    · Female sanitary items sufficient and essential for the flight, if unboxed (eg tampons, pads, towels and wipes)
    · Tissues (unboxed) and/or handkerchiefs
    · Keys (but no electrical key fobs)
    All passengers must be hand searched, and their footwear and all the items they are carrying must be x-ray screened. Pushchairs and walking aids must be x-ray screened, and only airport-provided wheelchairs may pass through the screening point.
    In addition to the above, all passengers boarding flights to the USA and all the items they are carrying, including those acquired after the central screening point, must be subjected to secondary search at the boarding gate. Any liquids discovered must be removed from the passenger.
     
  6. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    Just saw on CNN, insulin in the original prescription box is allowed. Must be an exact match to the name on the ticket.
     
  7. Rob

    Rob Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    30
    did i miss something here? what's the big deal about liquids? do they think someone is gonna try and drown the captian with their bottle of aquifina or what? haha.

    IMO it's getting absurd. instead of focusing their attention on the diabetics with the juce boxes, they should be focusing on that plesent geltelman in the buisness suit smuggling a plastic knife on board.

    I'm interested to hear about anyone's experiences in airport security to see how it goes. i can imagine things like this can be "irritating" to put it one way.

    all i cna say is that i'm glad i dont travel via air.
     
  8. Seans Dad

    Seans Dad Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Messages:
    51
    Liquid explosives, ipod, and 35,000 feet in the air is a bad combination. The story is they were planning on bringing down 10 planes.
    But, what is keeping the terrorist from putting the liquid explosive in his checked luggage and blowing it up with a cell phone.
    From what I understand we are unable to detect liquid explosives with dogs, detectors, etc.
    by the way, insulin, breastmilk and formula are ok to take on board the plane.
     
  9. Seans Dad

    Seans Dad Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Messages:
    51
    I have traveled on many airlines, Jetblue, SWA, United, British Airways, and NWA they all have juice onboard the plane and it was always free. I don't really understand the big deal about drinks on a plane.
    Although you can't take your Starbucks Caffe Latte on the plane the flight crew will gladly pour you a free cup.By the way, Jet Blue serves Dunkin Donuts coffee. Is this really that big of a deal or do we just need something else to complain about?
     
  10. Rob

    Rob Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    30
    ahh, liquid explosives, now it makes more sense, haha, i'm a hermit, i dont get out much...
     
  11. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    Found this on the JDRF site in regards to travel andT1D

    Flying with Type 1 Diabetes Supplies:
    New Homeland Security Measures May Impact Travelers with Diabetes

    The Department of Homeland Security released a bulletin today, August 10, 2006, in response to a terrorist threat uncovered in Britain against flights between the United States and the United Kingdom. The U.S. Government has raised the nation's threat level to Severe, or Red, for commercial flights originating in the United Kingdom bound for the United States. It has also raised the threat level to High, or Orange, for all commercial aviation operating in or destined for the United States.

    In addition, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) of the Department of Homeland Security has implemented a number of new security measures which may impact travelers with type 1 diabetes. For example, per the statement released today: "No liquids or gels of any kind will be permitted in carry on baggage. Such items must be in checked baggage. This includes all beverages, shampoo, sun tan lotion, creams, tooth paste, hair gel, and other items of similar consistency. Exceptions: Baby formula and medicines, which must be presented for inspection at the checkpoint." Travelers with diabetes who rely on juice boxes and other liquids to raise blood sugar levels may want to pack extra solid-food snacks to replace such liquids. The complete Homeland Security statement can be found at http://www.dhs.gov/dhspublic/.

    The information below excerpted from the guidelines for travelers with type 1 diabetes provided by the TSA remains the same. Please note, however, that JDRF is not responsible for the accuracy of this information. You may want to check the TSA website, as well as call your airline for additional information, before leaving for your trip.

    Persons with Type 1 Diabetes

    Notify the screener that you have type 1 diabetes and are carrying your supplies with you. The following type 1 diabetes-related supplies and equipment are allowed through the checkpoint once they have been screened:

    insulin and insulin loaded dispensing products (vials or box of individual vials, jet injectors, pens, infusers, and preloaded syringes);
    unlimited number of unused syringes when accompanied by insulin or other injectable medication;
    lancets, blood glucose meters, blood glucose meter test strips, alcohol swabs, meter-testing solutions;
    insulin pump and insulin pump supplies (cleaning agents, batteries, plastic tubing, infusion kit, catheter, and needle);
    glucagon emergency kit;
    urine ketone test strips;
    unlimited number of used syringes when transported in Sharps disposal container or other similar hard-surface container.
    Sharps disposal containers or similar hard-surface disposal container for storing used syringes and test strips.
    Insulin in any form or dispenser must be clearly identified.
    If you are concerned or uncomfortable about going through the walk-through metal detector with your insulin pump, notify the screener that you are wearing an insulin pump and would like a full-body pat-down and a visual inspection of your pump instead.
    Advise the screener that the insulin pump cannot be removed because it is inserted with a catheter (needle) under the skin.
    Insulin pumps and supplies must be accompanied by insulin.
    Advise screeners if you are experiencing low blood sugar and are in need of medical assistance.
    You have the option of requesting a visual inspection of your insulin and type 1 diabetes associated supplies.
    If you encounter problems with the screening process, ask to speak with the TSA security supervisor. You can report problems encountered while traveling by calling the TSA Consumer Response Center toll free at 1-866-289-9673.
     
  12. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
    Dehydration a Worry for Some Travelers
    ATLANTA, Aug. 11, 2006 (AP) Air travelers with medical conditions may suffer dehydration or other risks because of new air travel restrictions that prohibit people from bringing drinks onto the plane, some doctors say.

    Bottled water and cans of nutritional supplement drinks are among the liquids that can't be carried on board.

    Such restrictions may pose some risks, starting with dehydration, said Dr. Marc Siegel, an internal medicine physician with the New York University School of Medicine.

    Dehydration can place an unhealthy strain on people with diseased hearts or kidneys. The dry air in the passenger cabin also dries out the mucous membranes that help protect the body from invading bacteria and viruses.

    "Though I'm not calling this life-threatening, dehydration is not a good state for anyone ill to be in," Siegel said.

    The government ban does not apply to prescription medicines with labels that match the passenger's name. And jets carry medical kits that stock medicines for heart attacks and certain other emergencies.

    Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines Inc. on Thursday began provisioning extra bottled water on all flights because of the new travel restrictions, spokeswoman Betsy Talton said Friday.

    She declined to say how many bottles and how much it will cost Delta, the nation's third-largest carrier.

    Patients can help themselves by staying away from coffee, alcohol and other diuretic beverages that can contribute to dehydration, Siegel said.

    "Even with all these restrictions, people need not panic. It's mainly an inconvenience," said Siegel.

    However, Dr. David Freedman of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, noted the problems faced by people who rely on Ensure and other over-the-counter nutritional supplement drinks.

    "Some people can't eat ordinary airline food," including patients with inflammatory bowel disease or people who have recently had intestinal surgery, said Freedman, director of UAB's Travelers Health Clinic.

    The U.S. Transportation Security Administration is allowing passengers to carry on essential nonprescription medicines, such as insulin, as well as baby formula and breast milk for infants. But Ensure is not permitted, said Christopher White, a TSA spokesman.

    "While we understand these restrictions may cause inconveniences for some passengers, it is important to aviation security that we limit the exceptions," he said.

    Diabetics, who must travel with essential supplies, may be especially concerned by the new restrictions. Insulin pump manufacturers say pumps can safely go through airport security systems, but pump wearers may request a visual inspection rather than walking through the metal detector or being hand-wanded, said Rachel Morgan, a spokeswoman for the American Diabetes Association.

    Most planes have medical supplies that address three of the most worrisome emergencies that can occur in the air, said Joan Sullivan Garrett, founder and chairman of MedAire Inc., an Arizona-based company that provides emergency medical kits and advisory services to airlines.

    They carry inhalers for asthma attacks, nitroglycerin for chest pains and many carry glucagon injections for diabetics who pass out with low blood sugar, she said.

    However, federal regulations do not authorize flight attendants to administer drugs from the kits, which is why the flight crew will ask if a doctor or nurse is on board when an emergency occurs, she added.

    She advised patients to carry any needed medications in labeled prescription bottles and keep them handy. "Don't assume they have it (your medication) on board or have access to it," Garrett said.
     
  13. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    Security Level Remains The Same, Tsa Refines And Clarifies Ban

    It's just the travel agent in me coming out!

    SECURITY LEVEL REMAINS THE SAME, TSA REFINES AND CLARIFIES BAN

    Low blood sugar treatments including glucose gel for diabetics permitted.

    Info obtained from:
    http://www.tsa.gov/press/releases/2006/press_release_08132006.shtm

    Hopefully, apple juice will be allowed next.
     
  14. Becky

    Becky Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    61
    keeping insulin cool?

    I can only assume that my ice packs and Frio that I use to keep insulin cool would not be allowed through security. How have other dealt with this?

    Becky
     
  15. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    5,560
    I had an ice pack with the insulin when traveling this past weekend. Nothing was said about it. We sailed straight through security in the Pittsburgh airport. The screener said it was obvious what we were carrying. I thought we would have been searched a little more.
     
  16. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    Very interesting, I figured Frio wouldn't be allowed, as it a gel pack inside the pouch. That's great to know!
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2006
  17. T_Adelaide

    T_Adelaide Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2006
    Messages:
    111
    Yep you did miss something! Supposedly one of the bombers in the UK was planning on travelling with his wife & baby with liquid explosives in the baby's bottle- hence the ban.
     
  18. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
    Anger At Airport Insulin Ban Pensioner

    http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/tm_objectid=17575952&method=full&siteid=66633&headline=anger-at-airport-insulin-ban-pensioner-name_page.html

    17 August 2006
    ANGER AT AIRPORT INSULIN BAN PENSIONER
    TERROR ALERT..
    A PENSIONER has hit out after her diabetic husband was banned from carrying insulin on to a flight.
    Elizabeth and Kerr McLetchie were returning from Poland on Tuesday when they were banned from taking the medicine on board.
    Security restrictions at Warsaw's Etiuda Airport meant they were only allowed a plastic bag for hand luggage. Kerr, 68, was allowed to take his nasal sprays for his heart condition on to the plane but had to check his insulin in with his luggage.
    All passengers were given leaflets explaining which items they would be allowed to carry as hand luggage which included medicine.
    Elizabeth, 66, of Paisley, said: "Kerr could have slipped into a diabetic coma during the flight and I'd have been helpless.
    "Thankfully, it didn't come to that but it can be fatal for a diabetic to go without their insulin."​



    An airport spokesman said: "I don't understand why he wasn't able to take his insulin on board.​

    "You are allowed to take medication you need for the duration of your trip."​
     
  19. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
    There's no way I'd allow my child's insulin to be put in the cargo belly of the plane. I just wouldn't travel.

    http://news.cheapflights.co.uk/flights/2006/08/air_travel_advi.html

    Air travel advice for diabetes patients

    The Diabetes UK charity has warned diabetes sufferers about packing insulin in suitcases that will be carried in the hold of aircraft during the heightened security measures.
    The current restrictions on liquids and gels does allow mediciation with prescriptions to be carried in hand luggage. Up to 50ml of insulin is permitted, which is usually enough for a few weeks.
    However, if any more insulin is needed, it will have to be stored in a suitcase in the hold of the plane. This can sometimes damage the insulin, as it can freeze when exposed to low temperatures.

    Diabetes UK is advising people to place any insulin that has to go in the hold in an airtight container (such as a flask) in the middle of their suitcase.
    Alternatively, if an airtight container is not available, wrap it in bubble wrap, then in a towel and again place in the middle of a suitcase.
    The charity is also saying that people should carry with them any prescriptions or a diabetes ID card displaying a photograph of the holder and signed by their doctor. It is also possible to tell check-in staff that there is insulin in the suitcase and ask if it can be placed in an area of the aircraft’s hold that is heated.
    If cold temperatures have affected insulin, Diabetes UK says that crystals will be present. The insulin should be discarded.
    © Cheapflights Ltd Craig McGinty
     
  20. Connie(BC)Type 1

    Connie(BC)Type 1 Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2005
    Messages:
    3,388
    I don't see why you can't notify the airline to have a juice box at your seat when you board the plane, or ring for the attendant when you get settled and explain the situation, I see nothing wrong with the rules, just pre arrange everything with the airline, they always have juice on board. Most airlines I've dealt with in the past have been very accomadating. They are allowing all medical devices with a letter from your health provider. Why make problems when none really are there! ! :D :D :rolleyes: The rules are to protect us! Sorry, just my humble opinion
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice