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Need advice: Should I bother sending Dexcom receiver to camp??

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Lisa - Aidan's mom, Jul 8, 2014.

  1. Lisa - Aidan's mom

    Lisa - Aidan's mom Approved members

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    DS attends a day camp for kids with various medical issues; mostly allergies, asthma and there are four D kids. One wonderful, but overworked nurse and lots of competent counselors.

    Yesterday they went swimming at the local university pool. I gave the counselor the Dexcom receiver in a plastic baggie. Obviously with swimming Dexcom couldn't pick up and apparently the other times while they were at Rutger's she was too far away from him since the trend graph was out from 10:00 - 2:00'ish. He was fine, but he's an active 9 year old who wouldn't dream of pulling himself away from the fun if he was low, argh.

    Tomorrow they are going to a water park. Should I even send the receiver in?? The park is large, but I know the nurse will hunt him down for a BG check before lunch at minimum and give him his Novolog and again check him when they get on the bus. The counselors are aware of signs of a low BG.

    I cannot go tomorrow and although my older non-D son is at the camp, he is a counselor in training and has his own group of little kids to worry about it. I'm thinking just skip it; why bother if he's going to be out of range most of the time and take the risk of it being lost. What would you do in this situation??

    Thanks for any ideas you may have!
     
  2. ksartain

    ksartain Approved members

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    I would not unless you're out of warranty and can get another one quickly and at a better price than buying one in warranty. The diabetes camp Chris is going to in a few weeks said no Dexcom. Two kids lost their receivers last year and one lost a sensor. After already losing a receiver to water damage while in warranty and knowing how much it is to replace it again, I will definitely NOT be sending Dexcom with Chris.
     
  3. shannong

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    My son went to camp this week and I had this very same thought about whether to send Dexcom or not. I decided to send it inside a lined cooler bag that he uses as his diabetes kit. We don't get a lot of readings, but it is a small camp so don't fee that it will go missing or anything. We are mostly relying on blood checks though, so if you have any concerns about losing it, I would not send it.
     
  4. rgcainmd

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    My daughter will be going to D-camp later this month; no CGMs allowed, so that's one decision I don't have to make. For my daughter's one-week (day) band camp, I'll send her with the receiver because there's no swimming and she'll just keep it in her Spi-Belt. For Y-camp (also a day camp) I guess I'll go ahead and send it with her because (knock wood!) she always remembers to take off her Spi-Belt (where the Dexcom receiver lives) and places it where it can't get wet before getting into our neighbor's pool. For peace of mind, I will go ahead and put the receiver in a ziplock or Aquapack while she's attending Y- camp.
     
  5. Lisa - Aidan's mom

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    Thank you; it seems wise to leave it home on swimming/water park days.
    He'll take it on days when they go bowling/movies/arcades/parks, etc.
     
  6. Beach bum

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    We didn't send ours because the kids are responsible for responding to the alarms, and I know my usually responsible daughter would pay no attention to it because she's got better things to do with her time:wink: Plus she wanted a break from CGM'ing. This is a diabetes camp, so she is constantly checking and they are so on top of things that I am very comfortable with this decision.
     
  7. MEVsmom

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    My daughter has been in various non-D day camps this summer and I send it. She is responsible with it and uses it to manage her day to day care so we had no issues.

    She goes to D-Camp for the first time next week and they also have the no CGM rule, which I abhor. If that's the way she manages on a day to day basis and she is comfortable with it and I don't mind the risk of her losing it then she should be able to wear it. I had another local mom, say, "It must be your first year." Well, yes, but whether it's my first year or my 16th year, she should have that right to wear it if she wants to, which she does.
     
  8. Another Day

    Another Day New Member

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    My son just came back from a week at D camp. They also had a no cgm rule; yet 80% of kids were pumpers. He was fine without it, he does lose it all the time..so he had a week off from it. They run them high all the time so they do not go low..going through the withdrawal now of the lower insulin and DEX is really helping now that back on him.

    The main reason is the alarms are disturbing and they want the kids to have fun..there are plenty of staff to help monitor them.
     
  9. rgcainmd

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    This is also what I heard RE the reasoning behind the "NO CGM" rule, and I'm completely O.K. with it. I don't think the responsibility for lost or broken CGMs is the issue. How much sleep do you think anyone would get (both counselors and campers alike) if every kid (or even several kids) in every cabin had their CGMs going off once (or more) every (or even some) nights? Can you imagine how many CGM alarms would be sounding during the day? (I suspect the majority of kids using CGMs would be experiencing more alarms more frequently because of the different kinds of and higher amount of physical activity that occurs at camp.) And unless I'm mistaken, there are only two CGMs (Dexcom or Medtronic), so everyone would be needing to check their receivers every time anyone's (within earshot) alarm sounded: "Was that mine?" What kind of fun would these kids have if they were constantly (or even frequently) checking their receivers?

    My daughter will be much more closely monitored at D-camp than she is at home, not only because I work full-time (but still continue to manage her T1D during work hours via text and by phone) but because over 95% of the staff at my daughter's D-camp have T1D themselves, and there will be a CDE AND an endocrinologist at the camp 24/7. Plus the ratio of campers per staff is very reasonable. Even if I were a stay-at-home mom, I doubt I could monitor my kid more closely 24/7 than she will be monitored at D-camp. (Does anyone have a "camp-age" child with T1D who is never out of their sight nor out of earshot? Doesn't your child ever play at a friend's house where there isn't someone truly proficient at managing T1D present?) All kids are checked twice every night. I think I'd be okay without a CGM in real life if it were possible to have my daughter monitored by this many people 24/7 who know what they're doing when it comes to managing T1D. She'll have more trained eyes on her 24/7 at D-camp than she did when she was in the hospital after diagnosis, for heaven's sake. No CGM plus responsible adults who live with T1D on a daily basis and who are present 24/7 trumps CGM plus responsible adults who do not live with T1D every time as far as I'm concerned. My daughter survived and I managed not to accidentally kill her before we had a CGM. Personally, I never want to feel so dependent on a CGM that the thought of my daughter not having one while she is at D-camp is upsetting. Heck, I'm actually happy that my daughter will have this opportunity to go without her CGM and still be safe for a week. And I'm not concerned about control that is "less tight" for 7 days out of the year.

    Different situation entirely when my daughter goes to non-D camp. I'm pretty insistent on her having her CGM in this situation. But I've never heard of anyone encountering a "NO CGM" rule at "regular" camp...
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2014
  10. Lisa - Aidan's mom

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    I understand the no CGM at a D camp situation.

    DS doesn't go to D camp. There are four kids with D, but he's the only one with a CGM. We decided to keep it home on swimming/water park days.
     
  11. Mommy For Life

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    Sounds like a mini D camp to me! :cwds:


    Yesterday DD left for her first 8 day non D camp. "Dexie" went with her fully charged in a bag like this. I made a D kit using a small clear cosmetic bag that has the dex, meter, glucose, etc. When we got to camp we met 2 other counselors that were T1. So I guess my DD is at a mini D camp too! :wink:
     
  12. MEVsmom

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    Wow, I appreciate your support. I wish I was a smart as you. Responses like this are why I often hate this forum. It's the most unsupportive thing I have ever seen.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2014
  13. Christopher

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    That seems like a really ineffective way to manage a child's diabetes. I totally agree with MEVsmom, if a child is used to using technology to keep their blood sugar in range, it seems wrong to take that away from them.

    So they are worried about the alarms being disturbing? They would rather have the kids bg's be out of range? I am glad my daughter never wanted to attend one of these camps. I am sure they are great experiences for some but this "rule" seems silly.
     
  14. rgcainmd

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    After reading two PMs from another parent on this forum describing some unacceptable and (IMO) unsafe circumstances at a nearby diabetes day camp, I believe I've made some assumptions regarding diabetes camps that may be incorrect.

    I thought that in order to be called an "official" diabetes camp, certain procedures/protocols, guidelines, and minimum requirements needed to be in place and licensing needed to occur and be maintained via inspection and certification by an officially recognized entity/authority. I thought there were mandatory and enforceable rules in place regarding maximum number of staff per camper, mandatory requirement that a registered nurse or MD be present 24/7, allowance of CGMs or mandatory overnight BG checks, strict minimum guidelines regarding the training of staff (counselors, dietitians, etc.) Or can essentially anyone who wants to make some money and who has a piece of land with some tents and a few teens who were taught inadequate basics about type 1 D hang up a sign/get a website, proclaim themselves a "diabetes camp" and open for business? If the latter is the case, it goes without saying how wrong this is... Childcare providers must be licensed and inspected and there are clear requirements that must be met in order to obtain and maintain licensure such as maximum number of staff per child for specific age groups, minimum standards for nutrition provided, requirements regarding first aid certification, etc. I realize than any bozo can put up a sign in their front yard advertising that they will watch your children for you while you are at work, but that they cannot legally make any claims regarding their competency until they meet state or regional licensing requirements. Anyone who leaves their children in the care of someone who is not a trusted relative or close friend or responsible babysitter or who is not a licensed provider needs their head examined... Doesn't the same sort of scenario hold true for diabetes camps? I'm glad that I did my research and obtained a recommendation from a trusted source in order to be as sure as humanly possible that the diabetes camp my daughter will be attending has what I consider to be minimum standards/provisions/protocols and safeguards in place.
     
  15. mamattorney

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    The diabetes camp my daughter will be going to for the first time on Friday (yea and eek at the same time) doesn't prohibit cgms, they just enforce a protocol that makes it less desirable for my daughter to wear one at camp. It sounds like a fingerstick has to be done any time it alarms and depending upon where we'd set the alarms, that could be often enough to make it pretty darm inconvenient. The protocol seems a little silly to me, not because they would be alarming all the time - but because that's not my child's reality with a cgm. For example, tonight she tested 94 before dinner, but the cgm alarmed low (80) right after dinner because the carbs hadn't caught up yet. Doing a fingerstick in that case would be idiotic to me under ordinary circumstances, since you aren't going to take any action and it alarmed maybe one more time before the carbs of dinner took effect and she was no longer low. I suppose with 150 kids they need a simple protocol with minimal judgment calls, but I think as more kids wear cgms, they are going to have to accommodate them a little better.
     

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