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my endo problem

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Megnyc, Nov 24, 2014.

  1. Megnyc

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    I haven't had an endo appointment in a long time. That is because 1. I haven't been home in ages. 2. My endo makes me really really uncomfortable. My prescriptions are going to expire at the end of the year and I am pretty sure my endo will not refill them unless I have an appointment. They wouldn't send a new prescription for my new dex receiver a few months ago unless I made an appointment. So I made an appointment and then canceled it once I got the prescription (I know, that is pretty awful, I just didn't know what else to do).

    The simple solution seems to be to find a new endo. But the problem is I am moving in May and I am not sure where. There is about a 50% chance I end up in San Francisco, 20% Madison, WI, and 20% Chicago. The other 10% accounts for basically anywhere else in the country. So, short of throwing a dart at a map of the US I have no idea where to even find an endo. My parents live in DC now but I really never go there so that doesn't make sense. I could see an endo near my college but it seems strange to get a new doctor for one appointment.

    Does anyone have any ideas? Is there some brilliant solution that I am missing? I think I will just end up seeing a random endo near my school so I can get prescriptions but it seems so tedious to go through the trouble of all that paperwork for one appointment :(
     
  2. Lakeman

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    Maybe it would be a good idea to see an endo a few times a year. Now seems like as good a time as any even if you change to a different endo.
     
  3. Beach bum

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    I'd probably try and get an endo where you are. Even though you are moving, you will have a point of contact in case of an emergency and someone who can still prescribe stuff even once you move. They also may have contacts in one of the cities you finally land in, possibly making the transition to a new doc easier.

    I guess you need to decide which is more of a hassle. Going home to the doc you don't like or setting up a new one. Either way, you'll need a doc to carry you through until your next move.
     
  4. dpr

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    Unfortunately it's probably easier to get an appointment with your old endo before the end of the year. I'd just bite the bullet and get your scripts filled. If your moving in 6 months it will probably be the last time you ever have to see him/her.
     
  5. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    My family doc does all my prescriptions, if needed, I actually haven't had a Rx for a D supply in my life. My family doc did do the Rx for my new pump though. I haven't seen an endo in many many years, at least 6, could be longer, but I just have no need to see one.
     
  6. C6H12O6

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    Maybe see what the student wellness center at your Uni suggests ?
     
  7. Megnyc

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    I have been researching family practice doctors now. None of the like 3 endos near my school take my insurance. It isn't my insurance's fault (for once)-- I really do go to school in the middle of nowhere. I'm wondering if I could go to a family practice doctor instead of an endo. I think I will call my school health center some time soon but I'm really not sure how helpful they will be. It is only my prescriptions for insulin and strips that will expire anyway and I have at least 18 months of extra supplies so it isn't a big deal if there is some gap. I just don't want to run through my whole insulin stockpile when there is no real reason to.
     
  8. RomeoEcho

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    I have been able to get temporary scripts from a GP/health center before. I explained the problem, promised to see an endo when possible and didn't admit to the stockpile. They didn't want to take responsibility for me but also wouldn't turn me away. I can usually get 1-3 months this way.
     
  9. Tricia22

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    If you end up in Madison, let me know... I know a GREAT D clinic here... and I know a handful of PWDs in Chicago, so if you end up there I can do some research for you... Good luck!
     
  10. moco89

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    This is sketchy, but one time, to get a medical device that I thought I needed (but my doctor at the time did not approve of), I went to a local urgent care with "good" online ratings and self-paid (no insurance involvement--to prevent any potential of fraud), and I told them that I lost my insurance and I needed the supplies.

    The doctor was reluctant to write an Rx because endos usually do (in this case) but I told him it "wasn't going to go through insurance anyways".

    This is really sketchy and doctor shopping and dishonest, but it worked.

    I personally would look for some "doc-in-a-boxes" but I would not recommend this for long-term solutions.
     
  11. mmgirls

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    Yes I would just get a referral to a GP or family doctor that you can see in the mean time, I would not bother with a endo unless you want a finger stick A1C. By now you know what labs you need ran, but skipping a Dr all togeather not a great idea.
     
  12. nanhsot

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    My son is in college so I understand where you are coming from. His solution is an endo in a large college town (not his, but he attended there one summer) who allows him to SKYPE his appointments. It's pretty cool. He does not charge insurance, he has one of those concierge practices which I LOVE. We have easy access to them for asking questions/getting RX filled and he chats with him every 3 months via the computer. He emails lab slips and we get them done when he's home or he goes to the university clinic.

    I'd see if there are any progressive thinking practices out there like this one who would work with you wherever you land. It also helps that both this MD AND his wife/RN are T1.
     
  13. Megnyc

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    Will do. Thanks :)

    We have it narrowed down to Madison or Chicago at this point. I came very close to going to college near Chicago (in Evanston) so I actually connected with a great endo there. We LOVE Madison though and I remain somewhat hopeful it will work out. My boyfriend and I will be going there again in a few weeks for a "second look" visit and then we will make a final decision. We are just trying to balance what makes the most financial sense (which is Chicago by a landslide) with the place we think is the better fit. Anyway, probably way more than you want to know but I will PM you for the endo rec if we do end up there.
     
  14. Melissata

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    I would call around to general practice docs and/or family docs. Just ask if they treat type 1 patients. My son hasn't seen an endo in years and my daughter is only seeing one now because the family doc that we were seeing is no longer practicing except very part time. The practice we changed to does not treat type 1, so we have no choice but to have an endo for her too. If I run across a family doc for her that will do both, I would eliminate the endo in a heartbeat.
     
  15. Tricia22

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    Obviously finances are a huge deal, but just for some perspective on that front... in Madison, you can easily find a 1 bed 1 bath apartment for $700 - $1000. In Chicago or the suburbs, if you're wanting 1 bedroom 1 bath (not a studio or junior 1 bed), you'd be more likely to spend $1000 - $2000. General cost of living is also way higher in Chicago... even gas prices are always way cheaper across the cheddar curtain into Wisconsin. Sales taxes in Chicago are much higher than the state of Wisconsin... ummm... better beer and cheese in Wisconsin... the Badgers ROCK! Have I convinced you to move here yet?!
    I was born in Madison (as were my parents, grandparents, lots of family born and raised here) but grew up in the far northern Chicago suburbs, and have applied for, interviewed, and considered Chicago jobs in the past. I have a bunch of friends living in the city as well.
    If there's anything I can do to help, or even if you just want to meet up when you're in Madison, let me know!
    triciamoore2@aol.com
     
  16. Megnyc

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    Here's an update:

    I saw a family practice doctor today at my school health center. I am actually no longer a student there but since I am still an employee of the lab I work in (which is on campus), I was able to be seen for a small copay. He had no idea how insulin pumps work but I explained my situation and he provided a full year of prescriptions, ordered the lab work I wanted, and gave me a lab order form so I could get another A1C done in 3 months. I still have no idea where I will be spending the next 6-7 years of my life but when I do I will hopefully find an actual endo.

    Some unsolicited advice for the parents of teens on here, if you can, it would be really helpful to get your kid set up with a really good endo (ideally someone who can see them all the way through college) who they are comfortable with before they leave for college. I'm not sure what exactly went wrong in my situation but I completely fell through the cracks. I know I can come across as a bit irresponsible on here at times but I have actually been pretty on top of this and yet the medical care I have received for my diabetes over the past 3.5 years has been severely lacking. The only reason various medication interactions and concerning test results were not missed was that I got lucky and noticed them myself. Perhaps someone can learn from my mistakes :)
     
  17. Ali

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    Ahh Megnyc,
    I have been there. Adult now, but diagnosed as teen and at loose ends for good care in college and after. It is not being irresponsible but being a "kid". Usually as a HS student you are not really involved in finding physicians and setting up appointments and dealing with insurance. I am so happy you found someone to help with prescriptions. For the Endo, at this point it depends on finances and insurance. First start calling state agencies for help, it is a mess trying to figure stuff out. Just take a afternoon off from work and start calling state agency numbers. A good place to look for Endos that often work with those with limited means are those associated with Universities with Med schools, they also are often the best endo practices. Good luck, and be strong it is just often a lot of time on phone calls and waiting on phones, even if you have money and insurance,:)Ali
     
  18. Snowflake

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    Obviously, I'm more than a decade away from worrying about this, but I think this is a good point.

    I'm just kind of curious because I've spent most of my adult life either in school or working for universities: Was your student health insurance plan part of the problem? A lot of student plans I've seen don't approach the kind of comprehensive coverage that would be available if a young person stayed on a parent's employer-sponsored plan, with specialist coverage like endo care looking especially spotty. But I'm not sure if that's a gross generalization from a few bad products!
     
  19. KatieSue

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    We're here now. Mine is 19 and a college freshman. She wanted to transition to an adult endo rather than stay at the Childrens Hospital where she's been since diagnosis. I'm not liking it but she seems to. She's been going to her own appointments etc.

    My concerns are many. They only want to see her every 6 months. They were unable/unwilling to do much to help us get an over-ride when her insurance stopped covering any other strips but one-touch. She's omnipod so we need freestyle. They don't do finger stick A1C so she has to go get a draw, which seems silly to me plus costs me an additional $35 copay. She's not been managing well and the doc doesn't seem all that concerned. They have no ability to download her meter at appointments nor do they want any print outs. I'm not sure how they can do anything with only A1C info.
     
  20. Ali

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    She needs a different adult Endo. My adult Endo does everything you are wanting. When she calls around she can ask the clinic those questions. Ali
     

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