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Must See Video: The Artificial Pancreas in Action (see video at link)

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Ellen, Nov 1, 2011.

  1. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    Must See Video: The Artificial Pancreas in Action (see video at link)
    By: A Sweet Life Staff | October 31, 2011
    Categories: Children, Featured, Insulin & Pumps
    While we wait and hope for a diabetes cure, we make the most of the technology that helps us manage our disease. Fortunately, the technology keeps getting better. Earlier this month we reported the exciting news about the world?s first out-of-hospital artificial pancreas trial. The trial, conducted by Professor Moshe Phillip and his team at the Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetes at Schneider Children?s Medical Center of Israel and Eran Atlas, head of the engineering team at the Diabetes Technology Institute at Schneider Children?s, took place on Kibbutz Ma?ale Hahamisha in the hills outside of Jerusalem......

    http://asweetlife.org/a-sweet-life-...ideo-the-artificial-pancreas-in-action/21243/
     
  2. mom24grlz

    mom24grlz Approved members

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    I can't get the video to play:confused:
     
  3. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    Can anyone help the people who can't view it? What plug in do they need? Thanks.
     
  4. swellman

    swellman Approved members

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    It played fine in Internet Explorer 9 but Firefox needed a Windows Media Player 11 plugin.
     
  5. Mom2Kathy

    Mom2Kathy Approved members

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    I got it to play. Very interesting. The thought that kids (or adults) with T1D could possibly go through life without thinking about their diabetes is amazing.
     
  6. anna-bananna

    anna-bananna Approved members

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    This might seem like a stupid question, but what happens if the computer malfunctions, gets a virus, crashes, etc?

    Am I the only one who feels very uncomfortable leaving my child's life in the hands of a computer? I mean...I know I make mistakes...but I usually figure it out rather quickly, and that's because diabetes is always at the forefront of my thoughts.

    Am I the only one who is afraid my child could be dead before we could figure out that something is wrong with the AP, and what that is, and how to fix it?
     
  7. mom24grlz

    mom24grlz Approved members

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    That's probably my problem then. I use Firefox.
     
  8. MamaLibby

    MamaLibby Approved members

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    Wow!! This is fantastic. I'll have to show it to my kids. I started crying when the little girl said it'd be hard to let go of...I bet my daughter would feel the same way. Beautiful, and I hope this is a reality in the near future.
     
  9. Mommy For Life

    Mommy For Life Approved members

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    WOW! Amazing!! In the very first weeks after DD was dx she asked me if I would go to another state or country if there was a cure there. I would happily fly to Israel (or the moon if need be) to pick up this artificial pancreas!
     
  10. Lisa P.

    Lisa P. Approved members

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    I couldn't see the video.

    Pumping works poorly for Selah, we've discovered, and the CGMS is a miracle machine but I can never correct simply off of it -- the last sensor was off by 100 points twice. I've always understood the AP to be simply a combo pump and CGM, with maybe a glucagon component, that it's not different from using a pump and CGM it's just automated so you don't have to manually address anything. Is there more to it than that? Does the video address that? Is it assumed that by the time AP technology is available the pump and CGM tech will be perfected?
     
  11. thebestnest5

    thebestnest5 Approved members

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    It looked like Medtronic CGM and pump, connected to a computer for the algorithms in adjusting insulin needs (looked mostly like basal needs in the short video...maybe a meal after 4pm, I couldn't tell?). I did not see a glucagon component, it sounded like the pump either was instructed to suspend, reduce, or increase basal based on need.

    At one point the video showed that the sensor and pump temporarily lost communication for one child.
     
  12. tom_ethansdad

    tom_ethansdad Approved members

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    The pump is a computer (yes, noticed the MDI in your sig). Many T1 use all different kinds of insulin pumps every single day to deliver insulin. The CGM is a computer. Many T1 use that as well to monitor their BG, make changes to insulin regimen, etc.

    You don't hear stories of the computers in either the pump or the CGM crashing, getting a virus, malfunctioning.

    I trust computers much more than I trust a person. E will often have a low BG that he doesn't feel. He almost never feels a high BG. A computer can read the low from the CGM before it gets to a dangerous level and suspend insulin (or maybe even deliver something to help raise BG level). A computer can read the high and deliver additional insulin, even raise the basal rate, as necessary to help prevent long term complications. And the computer can do the calculations required for that much faster and with far greater accuracy than any human.

    Right now I have formulas and calculations to figure out how much insulin to give E based on carbs to be eaten combined with (and/or because of) a BG reading. I have formulas to figure out how many fast acting carbs he needs if he is low, or how long to suspend insulin. But I also know I make calculation mistakes. So I use a computer, a calculator, to do the calculations to make sure they are correct.

    But even then computers can fail (though the ones I am using with E haven't failed yet). What happens? The same thing that happens when I make a mistake. He ends up either high or low, and we correct.

    Just like pumps and CGMs, the AP would be a tool, not a cure. It would make managing diabetes easier, I think it could make it much easier. But it wouldn't remove the requirement to manage diabetes.
     

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