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MRI with contrast dye

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by susanH, Mar 22, 2012.

  1. susanH

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    Has anyone's child had a contrast MRI? my "child" is a young adult athlete whose orthopedic is asking for a contrast MRI to get a better view of a shoulder injury. (first one isn't good enough i suppose)

    I have heard/read the contrast agent can be harmful to the kidneys and, in rare instances, can cause permanent damage. "individuals with abnormal kidney function are at increased risk for NSF (nephrogenic systemic fibrosis)"

    my son has lived with type 1 for 21 years, no problems, and i feel as if this contrast agent has more risk than benefit for him. he has never shown signs of kidney problems and that's a very good thing!

    would you be comfortable having that dye used considering the warning it carries?
     
  2. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    I was fine with it. Had a brain MRI with contrast for suspicion of seizures.
     
  3. mmgirls

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    How about you have kidney function blood/urine workup if you are concerned that the Dye could be harmful?

    I assume that if kindney function is normal than there would be minimal risk and the test would be a benefit.
     
  4. hdm42

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    Campbell has had a number of MRI's with contrast. They were of his brain (encephalitis) and sinus cavity. In our case, I felt it was a better choice than a CT scan with all the radiation.
     
  5. sparty87

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    The common contrasting agent is Gadolinium. Here is what the FDA has to say about it, NSF is no joke.

    http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/DrugSafetyNewsletter/ucm142889.htm

    If your CWD has a healthy kidney, the risk is small, but not zero. I would ask the ortho if his treatment of your CWD will be significantly different based on the second scan... As with many medical procedures, it comes down to a risk/benefit trade off.

    I had it done with a brain MRI after some hearing loss. In my case, it was to look for a possible brain tumor. For me, the risk/benefit trade off was clear.
     
  6. Flutterby

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    Kaylee is actually going for an MRI with contrast dye tomorrow afternoon. She had to do a bunch of blood work plus a urinalysis before they'd do the MRI.
     
  7. Noel

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    My son who doesn't have diabetes, but does have a kidney disease had an MRI with contrast of his brain 2 weeks ago. Since it was done at the hospital where his nephrologist is, he was able to consult.

    My understanding after the conversation with the nephrologist and radiologist is that the contrast is potentially the most dangerous to someone who already has impaired kidney function. They were able to check my son's lab work and determine that his kidney function was normal (even though he has a kidney disease it has never been not been normal). They went ahead with the contrast. We all felt that it was safe. He had follow up labs to be sure and all is well, after the fact with the kidney function. Everything turned out fine, with the kidney function and his brain! :cwds:
     
  8. sarahspins

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    Unless his kidney function is already compromised, as I understand it the risk is the same as it would be for anyone else without D (assuming normal kidney function).

    I had a myelogram (which is done with contrast) as well as a CT scan with contrast done several years ago.. aside from a spinal headache caused by the dye injection (but not the dye itself), everything went just fine.
     
  9. susanH

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    thanks everyone.

    the FDA article is unsettling to me. i have placed a call with his endo to get his opinion.

    i will forever be an advocate for his health, it seems the very least i can do.
     
  10. OSUMom

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    I'm no help here, but I just wanted to say it's good to see you Susan. Hope your son, you, and your family are doing well. :cwds::cwds:
     
  11. linda

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    Em had MRI with contrast concerning swollen lymphnodes in tonsil area, because of concern re: previous tumors removed with Thyroid. All was fine (was temporary swollen lymphnodes due to bad case of Strep!!) :cwds: Good Luck.
     
  12. purplerayz

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    Hi. I am actually an MRI technologist. You should request to have his BUN and creat levels drawn and a GFR calculated before the test. A lot of facilities will do this anyway, but you are fully within your rights to request it. Where I work, if a patient is diabetic we either run the test or get results from another facility that was drawn within the last 90 days. If the GFR is within an "acceptable" range, there is very little risk to the kidneys. The GFR takes into account the patients age,weight, and creat levels to come up with an overall kidney function. I hope this information helps some. Good luck with his exam!
     

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