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made a believer out of me re: night testing

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Mrs. Russman, Feb 3, 2012.

  1. Mrs. Russman

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    I backed off on testing Ben every night, His blood sugar usually rises from Bedtime then drops back down by breakfast time. and he ALWAYS feels his lows.

    i woke up from a bad dream, and thought since I was awake I would test Ben. Give another little correction if he needed it. When I woke him, the first thing he said was "I'm hungry" his blood sugar was 67.
    Might he have woken up on his own soon? who knows. Would his blood sugar have kept falling or was it stable at 67? again, who knows. Will I be checking more often at night? YES!
     
  2. Amy C.

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    This may be the reason your son needs so much insulin: he may be going low at night and rebounding during the day. It takes a lot of insulin to bring him back into range.

    Lows at night mean less long acting insulin.
     
  3. Lenoremm

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    How do you know he always feels his lows?
     
  4. Connor's Mom

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    Glad you caught it! Like Amy said, undetected lows at night could account for higher insulin needs though out the day. It will be interesting to see what you find.
     
  5. Pauji5

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    How do you know? If he's sleeping and you're sleeping and no one is testing, how do you know? Doee he have a CGMS?

    This, to me, is the problem...if you're counting on him waking himself up when he's low, and one day, he's too low to wake up, then what?

    No one is the exact same everyday, for all of their lives..there are so many factors that affect D...which is why so many of us continue to test in the middle of the night....
     
  6. MomofSweetOne

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    Two nights ago, we had a perfect straight line. I was feeling great, thinking the basal rates were finally tweaked. Hah. Last night we had FIVE lows on those same rates. In my sleep deprived state, I didn't think to change the basal rate. One safe night - or even a series of nights - does not mean diabetes is going to continue to play the same. The changes don't come gradually sometimes.

    If anyone can help me figure out how to get the basal testing accomplished when this happens every time we get part way through, I'd really appreciate it. Gary Scheiner said in his class that the basic profile stays the same and to just adjust the entire profile, but I've never been able to get a 24 hour test period done before a drastic change occurs.
     
  7. Mrs. Russman

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    For over a week I tested twice at night and noticed the pattern. So I slacked off to once a night, and then was skipping some nights. Last night showed me that I need to continue checking at least once every night.

    okay I overemphasized, and assumed. He starts having symptoms in the 70's. He has never had a severe low blood sugar. He has woken up during the night with lows before. I have no evidence to support that he always feels his lows, but likewise have no reason to believe that he is having undetected lows.

    With testing twice at night for several nights, I saw no evidence of lows or rebounds.
    What I do see is evidence of a teenager who was left to his own devices for far too long and who doesn't consistently count carbs and take a shot when he eats.

    Last nights low was a result of correction shot at 11pm. He was 380, I had dosed him for 2 cookies earlier in the evening , he ate three, then he went to the office with his dad, and ate pretzels that my husband keeps on his desk. He doesn't pump and didn't have insulin with him.
     
  8. Lisa P.

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    Just as a note, basal testing always has a biochemical sorta effect on Selah, so it doesn't work for us. If we try to give her 24 hours without insulin, her body acts differently, different basal, etc., so it does us no good. We have to judge based on when rises and drops occur and overnight with no IOB or CarbsOB.
     
  9. MomofSweetOne

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    We skipped breakfast and supper with a nice sized lunch in the middle, with the intent of skipping lunch today. But, today she's on 70% of the basal and running in the 90s.:rolleyes:
     
  10. wilf

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    Very glad you caught this. :)
     
  11. Lee

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    We had this going on for about three months. No matter how much insulin I was giving, she was waking up high. Come to find out she was dropping and rebounding.
     
  12. bnmom

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    Sorry for the bad dream, but glad it woke you and resulted in a check. Good that you caught it, those nighttime lows are so scary.
     
  13. Bigbluefrog

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    Wow, what a night. It is one of those things, you can predict most nights, but then a curveball is thrown and you find yourself scratching your head wondering why is this happening.

    Diabetes is always throwing curveballs to keep us on our toes.

    Glad you caught the low.
     
  14. emm142

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    My diabetes obviously missed that memo!
     
  15. Pauji5

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    Yes, Emma....me too....I'm sorry, but it's statements like this that infuriate me. The one constant about diabetes is that IT IS NEVER THE SAME....... Everything that we do, eat, feel, all affect the numbers. It is such a misleading statement to say anyone can predict most nights.....

    That's why we check at night....
     
  16. Tamara Gamble

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    The nighttime thing is rough when it comes to any number but of course lows are the scariest. We were testing in the middle of the night and our sons number was not to bad actually. We couldn't figure out why he was high in the morning and everything that we were doing wasn't bringing it down. He has woken with his lows at night before so we weren't even looking at it that way very much. We used the ipro from our doctors office and our son was having two nighttime lows that were going undetected (45) to be exact. We were testing and somehow hitting the point where he was on his way up and were clueless. Out the window went the theory of him waking up when he was low. Now we have the Dexcom and it is so helpful. You asked what happens when they go low. Glucagon from the pancreas is released, glycogen, in the liver, breaks down into simple sugar to be used by the body. That's why we see a post high. That being said, our kids are still receiving insulin via a pump or long acting insulin when they are low. So for some.....well....nuff said. If it's possible I would really look into a CGMS. Good luck to you!
     
  17. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    Would you please add this response to this thread:

    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=68691&highlight=rebound

    DD has undetected lows like that when at her Dad's where no one is night-testing. She doesn't use a CGMS so I could not comment on that thread with proof. DD definitely has rebounds, but certainly not everytime she has a low and often hours after a low. These lows contribute to hypo-unawareness in the daytime, too.
     
  18. Tamara Gamble

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    Ok. I will click on the link and just copy and paste. I hope it helps.
     

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