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looking for travel tips

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by kail, Jul 13, 2014.

  1. kail

    kail Approved members

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    We are leaving in a few weeks for a 2 week vacation that will involve alot of driving, mostly hotels (with fridge and kitchen) and a couple camping days. We are on lantus and humalog MDI and still in the honeymoon phase. Last time we went on an extended weekend trip we had alot of highs and it was very stressful.

    Just looking for any type of tips/advice for travel either in handling medication regimen or what to bring or whatever.

    For example I was considering increasing our lantus the day before the trip since she was sooo high last time for the whole trip and find once we returned home. I also bought a frio pack though haven't tried it yet.

    Any special things I should take? How much in the way of extra supplies do you take?
     
  2. Lori_Gaines

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    We haven't gone on any trips that long, but I will say that whatever I thought I would need, I took double. My daughter's numbers and reactions to different events are too unpredictable for me to try and plan for. Whatever I prepare for, the opposite happens. Good times. :)

    Just to add, my DD never honeymooned, so it is different.
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Travel often makes for highs and for lows. I'd pack a ton of snacks and be prepared to test more frequently. I'd aim to keep the insulin cool but be wary of motel mini-fridges as they have lousy temp regulation and may freeze the insulin and ruin it. Pack 2x as much stuff as you think you will need, and don't forget batteries for the meter. Basically ask yourself "what would be a total pain in the butt to have to acquire in an emergency at 2 AM in a strange town?" and pack that :)

    Rather than increasing her basal, and she's on so little to begin with, I'd try to start the road trip with a lower carb breakfast and in range as much as possible so that you can see it it's inactivity (sitting in the car for hours) or the excitement that is making her high.

    Hope it's fun!
     
  4. mamattorney

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    I'd just like to echo bringing double of what you might need. We went on vacation recently and I thought I would generously need about 600 units of Humalog, so I brought 1200 and I ended up going through over 900 units because she was crazy high all the time. I was so glad I brought that extra insulin!
     
  5. MomofSweetOne

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    I try to always have a back-up insulin, even if I have 3x the amount of insulin I really need. If you carry pens, the change of breakage is less, but the last thing I want to have happen is to have the only vial I brought along get dropped. (horror face). We also had one trip where my daughter's insulin needs tripled, and I was worried that even with having taken triple, we might run short.

    Butt jumps at rest stops can effect BGs rather quickly, especially when combined with a correction dose. Since the butt is such a large muscle, it can help move the BGs in a lower direction more than other muscles. We also travel with a foldable scooter, frisbee, etc. for movement.

    If you don't have a CGM, I'd try to have one by then. It's nice to watch what is happening on trips and be on top of corrections or lows, especially when the CWD is asleep in the backseat, when pool time is what is happening each evening, when meals are suddenly triple the normal amount of carbs, etc.
     
  6. Snowflake

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    Maybe see how the first day goes, and then up the lantus? Fwiw, my dd always runs super-high on car trips, and higher than normal when traveling generally. We preemptively up her basals, which is the pump equivalent of Lantus adjustment.

    As for camping: the surprise for us on our only camping trip this summer, was that my daughter_would_not_eat_anything. She's a fairly picky eater in general, but she just was not digging any of the camping convenience foods we brought along, e.g., campfire quesadillas, beans, avocadoes, etc. Not only did she turn up her nose at the offerings, she was also just distracted by being in the woods. If memory serves, she subsisted on a handful of potato chips and a few pieces of chocolate. Fortunately, we were toting a ton of juice to treat lows, but it was not our finest moment in childhood nutrition. I just thought I'd mention the perils of being away from a full-service kitchen because your daughter is on the young side also!

    It sounds like a great trip. Enjoy!!!
     
  7. kail

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    Thanks everyone. I am pretty nervous about the trip. We have not taken a trip this long since we had kids, let alone the diabetes issue and 2 young children. It doesn't help that my daughter (with diabetes) gets car sick too or at least she used to. On our last trip and even a day trip to an amusement park, she started complaining of stomach ache within an hour of driving. Both times I thought she would either be low or be car sick and both times she was super high which I figured was from excitement. Last time we must have done a lousy job carb counting and dosing restaurant food although even food from home caused problems. We did forget the scale last time which didn't help but that only affected certain food items. I am really worried about keeping all the insulin at the right temperature especially if I am bringing several vials which is a several month supply for us and would need to be refrigerated. I desperately wanted the CGM for the trip but was shot down by my DH who doesn't want one yet and there isn't enough time now anyway.

    thanks everyone and please keep suggestions coming if anyone has any other ideas.
     
  8. MomofSweetOne

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    If you want the CGM, I would use this opportunity to really discuss with your husband why you want it and even encourage him to post here to ask questions of those of us who use them. It makes SUCH a difference with travel and abnormal activities. My daughter doesn't go high on trips. I know she's very atypical, but it's our YDMV area. She goes low and usually sleeps in the back seat. I don't have to manuever around to try to test her without waking her; she's being monitored every 5 minutes and since we also pump, if I see her dropping, I can even use a temp basal to avoid waking her to feed her. Obviously you're dealing with the opposite, but it's important for her well-being that you intervene early to break highs. You don't have as many tools in your arsenal to fight back against highs safely without CGM.

    You've mentioned camping. My daughter was newly on the pump by our first camping trip. I was totally unprepared for how much more exercise she would be getting with scootering all over the campground, having to hike to the washhouse, going on family hikes, etc. My memories of that trip is constantly feeding her because of lows. Low when we walked to the bathroom before bed & brushed teeth. Those clean teeth then got immediately messed up because we had to feed another low as soon as we got back to the tent. Then a trail hike ended up being postponed because she went so low and couldn't finish. It took an hour before she felt good enough to even hike to the nearest place my husband could bring the car.

    We don't see experiences like that now. We raise her low alarm to 100 - and we (I) watch it closely as well. We have time to feed before lows are bad. It makes life the most like pre-D it can - and the kids feel better. I don't know if you or your husband have ever felt lows or even a mid-to-upper 100, but they're miserable. Absolutely miserable, and the more time you can keep your daughter in a good range will make life better for the entire family.

    Last week my daughter swam every evening for at least two hours before bed while we were on a trip. I slept. Because of the CGM watching for lows. Otherwise I would have been testing every couple of hours for realistic fears of delayed onset hypoglycemia. When one's kid has dropped her BG 100+ points in 15 minutes by treading water right before bed, it doesn't make for restful sleeping without CGM.

    If you were to order a Dexcom tomorrow or the next day, you could possibly have it within a couple of weeks depending on how quickly your endo writes the order & insurance approves it. It's worth the attempt.

    Do you use vials or pens? Even if you prefer syringes, you could ask for a pen prescription and pull insulin out of it. It saves money when kids are on tiny doses because you're only wasting the extra of a pen (5 in a box) rather than the amount in a vial.

    If your daughter gets sick, brush up on mini-glucagon techniques just in case.

    We travel with a cooler and put the insulin in it, just not right on top of the ice block. Spare Dexcom sensors and test strips also travel in there. We call D the "uninvited guest" because of all the luggage it brings and monopolizes space that was already at a premium.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2014
  9. mom2ejca

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    We have one of those travel coolers that plug into the cigarette lighter, and it's turned out to be a really good investment. It's great for keeping insulin cold, but has also more than paid for itself since we're able to avoid eating out as much on long trips.
     
  10. Ali

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    If motion sickness is a possibility you might just give her the motion sickness pills or hare wear one of the bands they have now. I suffer from motion sickness and on boats I really benefit from just assuming the worst and prepping before boarding and not waiting to see if it is going to be one of those times. Just a thought.
    Ali
     

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