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Lockdown question

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Sarah Maddie's Mom, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. BittysMom

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    Recently did the same here. I decided I didn't like my daughter being 100% at the mercy of others (as competent as they are) and wanted her to have the ability to help herself. So I stashed a little package of pez candies in her pump pouch. You'd never even know they're there but I like the fact that she always has access.
     
  2. jules12

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    I use the 4x6 Index Card Box holders that snap shut. They are just the right size to fit glucose tabs and a package of cheese and crackers. I have one in every class my son has. He is in middle school this year. He also carries a pencil bag with his meter and glucose tabs or skittles with him from room to room.

    In grade school, I put the index card boxes in all the special rooms (PE, Music, Art, Computer Lab, Library). He had supplies in his main classrooml.

    We have had two instances - one was a lockdown and the other was a tornado drill. The first lockdown we were completely unprepared and from then on I put extras in the classroom. The nurse checked all "her" kids as soon as she was allowed to. The tornado drill he was allowed to bring his backpack and they have snacks in those areas available.

    I have also talked to my son that he could always run a temp basal or suspend his pump if he felt low and didn't have his meter or snacks with him in those situations.
     
  3. KatieSue

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    Interesting to see how different schools do things. Our middle school has no lockers, supposedly so they can't hide drugs in them, so the kids have to carry all their backpacks etc around because there isn't anywhere else to put them. They usually pile them in the classroom so in an emergency I'm not sure how easy it would be to extract yours.

    High School has lockers but she carries her backpack with her. But if she were out at PE or lunch I'm not sure how near to her it would be.

    She has backup supplies in the nurses office. And in case of evacuation the nurse is supposed to grab them all and take to the evacuation site. Per the district nurse her school has 22 diabetics and I'm sure a large number of kids with other allergies and conditions. I don't know how quickly in a real lock down she could get all that out.

    Lots of things to think about.
     
  4. hdm42

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    Sarah, I hadn't heard about this. Sorry for the scare, but definitely a good topic to bring up.

    Campbell carries his backpack everywhere, but like you said, he might not be able to grab it in a panic situation.

    I'm going to talk to him about this and see what we can come up with.
     
  5. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    That's what Maddie does as well, but they tend to drop their bags at one end of the cafeteria since they are big and bulky and they want to squeeze as many friends around the table as possible :p

    It was simpler in elementary and middle... if she wore a pump pouch every day that would help, but mostly she just sticks her pump in her pocket.

    I think I'll call some of the other local D moms and see how it went for their kids.;)
     
  6. Marcia

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    Whoa. This really got me thinking. Like you, we have supplies in every classroom, but I had never thought about if Abbey was in a public area and couldn't grab her purse. Does Maddie wear a lanyard and ID? You could get one of the little key tags from Walmart that holds 4 tabs and clip that to a lanyard. I think I might try that.
     
  7. denise3099

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    DD wears a purse across her front every day. In it is her cell phone and her kit. She never takes her purse off all day long. She only has it off during gym (Uh oh--I think I'll stick a roll of Pez in her spi blet with her pump). In the even of an emergency she wouldn't take it off. Also if she goes outside for gym, she'll wear the purse.

    I like the idea of wearing an id on a lanyard and adding a gluc keychain to it. Also stashing gluc in every pocket of every coat and jacket. I might even tape a thing of Pez to the side of her pump!
     
  8. VinceysMom

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    I did not read all the replies, but my kids are in high school, my DS is 11th grade. In each classroom, we have a "low kit"; I gave these to the teachers in the beginning of the year, and when certain items need replenishing, the teachers let me know. My son also carries a small mesh bookbag and he has skittles and and extra meter in that. So, in the event of a lockdown, at least he has some stuff with him and stuff in the classrooms. Yep, my biggest fear is that he will be without carbs when he feels low... ugh. :(
     
  9. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    Apparently, and I have never seen them in stores, the Dex 4 comes in packets of 4, so she could keep them in her pocket at all times. I always have a roll in my pocket(uncomfortable) and 2 in my purse. I have seen the packets with other people, my Type 1 CDE always has them in her pockets! She could also carry a small ziplock of tabs in her pocket.
     
  10. Christopher

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    Danielle started using these Quick Sticks:

    http://quicksticks.com/

    They are much easier to keep in your pocket than a roll of glucose tabs and they are 10g of carbs per packet.
     
  11. mmgirls

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    has anyone tried those GU packs that runners use? they are like a ketchup packet with an energy mixture, I think there are ones that are straight glucose but not sure. I am just thinking that they would fit waist packs and pockets better
     
  12. nanhsot

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    This has been an interesting read, my son isn't in school so the situation is different but brings up great thoughts overall, it's possible in all sorts of situations to get stuck without knowing ahead of time so it's good to have a plan.

    Did she have her meter on her (if you said I can't recall, sorry)?? I stock meters with one roll of smarties, a battery and a single syringe. If that's on him at least he has something to start with.

    We talk about different ways to get around things, for example when they herded into the kitchen, could she have grabbed something from there to take? A juice, some sugar packets, etc. We've discussed the "react and ask forgiveness later" type thing, there's usually some sugar around most places, but she would have had to be thinking about it before being put on the bus.

    That's part of the problem too, I think, with teens. I know mine does not like to have stuff on him, he takes his meter and that's about it, asking him to regularly carry a pack of glucose wouldn't sit well. And quite honestly, this type of thing just doesn't occur to him, so I'm not positive he'd have even thought of needing sugar.

    I'll be interested to hear the solutions you guys came up with. In the meantime though I personally would be having a dialogue with my teen because ultimately they will be out in the world without school plans and need to realize that situations may occur at work or other places similar to this and they need to react to keep themselves safe. Lowering basal comes to mind as a possibility in an emergency. Talking through some out of the box ideas like grabbing sugar packets from the coffee area if this were to happen at work, etc. (clearly this doesn't apply to younger kids, just pondering as I know this was a teen in the scenario).
     
  13. stewkimmom

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    That situation would have upset me! That's a long time to be without emergency carbs.

    DS8 is in 3rd grade. There is a lot of construction going on in the neighborhood which led to several evacuations to a nearby building due to strange smells and fear of gas leaks. There was also a 90 minute lockdown situation last year.

    It?s in our IHP that all areas of the school where DS may be will have an emergency box that we provide. The box contains fast acting and long lasting carbs. Staff must inform us if anything is used from the box so that we can replenish. Teachers are required to take the emergency box with them during any drill or evacuation. The school nurse, aide and office staff are also responsible for taking emergency carbs during any drill or evacuation.

    DS has recently started carrying something with him at all times because it was mentioned that during a lockdown, he could be pulled into a closet. His pump pack is not very big, so we?re experimenting with what to add. What is the smallest emergency carb with the most punch? That won?t break open? This week, we?re trying a small tube of icing. It?s awkward.

    The horrible new school nurse from hell has been arguing about everything and the emergency boxes are something she wants to get rid of. Not gonna happen. I'm all for him carrying something but there is no reason not to make sure the teachers have access to emergency carbs, too.

    She said all emergency supplies should be kept on his person.
    Not gonna happen.
     
  14. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I'm in communication with the school nurse. They are holding a series of de-briefing sessions focused on all the different areas of action including how the system failed or supported the kids with special needs.

    The nurse was very supportive and we spent a good bit of time identifying the points of concern and the decision moments that put Maddie in a risky position. In the end, I think the onus is on the kid to be as innovative as possible and perhaps to enlist help from her peers to make sure that she is safe. I agree that it will come down to her taking the time once in the kitchen to look for juices or sodas or even sugar packets.

    While the school will, I think, try to address the matter, it's probably going to end up being another step in her self-advocacy and self-care.

    I appreciate all the comments and ideas.:cwds:
     
  15. hdm42

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    I think you're right Sarah, that the schools will certainly try to do their best, but ultimately the responsibility is going to fall to the kids and their parents to figure out something that works.

    I talked to Campbell about this last night. He said that in "modified lockdowns" or drills, the kids with medical issues will be encouraged to come to the nurse's office. I said that's great, but it doesn't help much in a real emergency. He won't be going through the halls if there is a threat in the school. He's not keen on carrying more stuff in his pockets, but I think we're probably going to try that. Even just the little keychain tab packs are better than nothing.

    :cwds:
     
  16. Kimby

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    We had a lockdown at a middle school a few years ago during class change, so kids were pulled into the nearest classroom. There were no diabetic incidents, but since then, every classroom in our system has glucose in it. In our high school, every teacher has an emergency drawstring bag with a crank flashlight, smartees, water, bandaids, and a few other small things. They hang in each room where even a sub would see them. Teachers take them with them for fire drills, etc. For severe weather drills, all the diabetics meet with the nurses where they have extra supplies. I believe the pta paid for the bags and whatever wasn't donated.
     

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