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Let 's talk about communication!

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Bigbluefrog, Jan 27, 2011.

  1. Bigbluefrog

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    How good is your teen at alerting you about lows or chronic highs?

    At 3 am, I was up and decided to check her bg, and she is low 68bg, and so now I am trying to decide if a temp basal would do the trick, or treat.

    I decided to treat, gave 8 g of juice, and a 13 g yogurt. Reduced basal 20% for an hour. My dd then tells me she has been low all day!
    We are having this conversation at 3 am!
    These lows during her menses, don' t add up. And she was running everyday basal not the special souped up basal for that special time.

    After our discussion, I dosed for the 13 g and reduced her basals for 4 hours at 30%.

    She was 130 at breakfast, and wanted to lower all her basals,
    Whoa, let's run your numbers and do a reduced temp basals until we can see if this a one day low or new pattern.

    Okay, I would of rathered dealt with this at a time I was fully awake.
    And I was not planning on doing a night check! Good thing I did.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2011
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    It sounds like your dd is managing most D stuff independently. My 13 year old isn't there yet, so I know throughout the day what her bgs are doing ( not every number, but most of them).

    We co-log, and I do her before sleep check myself just be be sure that it's not forgotten ( mind you, she's been D since 4, so it's rather an old habit).

    I think you have two options. Either your dd starts logging in a public way so that you can glance at the numbers, or you can do a quick nightly review of her meter. Or, dd has to step up and start thinking more comprehensively about her D and taking greater responsibility. Personally, I think the later is a lot to ask of a 14 year old, but every kid is different.

    Did you get to look at Joe's video? He spends a lot of time working with teens and parents of teens helping them to transition to independent care. Might be worth a look.:cwds:
     
  3. Jordansmom

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    My DD has to increase basals the week before but does a 20% decrease during.

    At 15, we are having some of the same trouble communicating. It's difficult when you're trying not to make every interaction about D but you find yourself having to do a lot of interrogation just to find out what's been going on.
     
  4. PatriciaMidwest

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    I think it's somewhat common to need more insulin before and less during and after. Gary Sheiner did a study that explained this more in depth. He found some women are very insulin sensitive during and a few days after and then they become increasingly more resistant in the days before the next cycle begins. Hope that helps.
     
  5. Bigbluefrog

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    That does help, thanks I will have to read his study.

    And what is Joes video? I must of missed that one, Sarah.
     
  6. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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  7. Bigbluefrog

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    I know what you mean, I have been letting her do most of the d stuff. We don't log anymore, the pump stores the data and we look at it once a week.
    Unless we have issues....
    Your right a week before she was running higher so we increased basals a little bit, now this week it's lower.

    I am trying to get her to figure it out....after all she will need to do this.

    Yet, I still want to be there for her. And I do the night checks still, because I can.
     
  8. wilf

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    We keep a log book of every day's BG numbers, and we also try to log all injections. We have I think 18 books going all the way back to DD's diagnosis. It is just part of the day's routine that after DD gets home that we will pick up the meter at some point and write those numbers in the book.

    The book gives us a long term record of what is happening - it can be very helpful to all of us if we want to see how we handled last Easter when this Easter is coming up, or how we bolused last time out at any one of our favourite restaurants. It also makes the check of the day's numbers more neutral (as they're just being transposed to the book).. :cwds:

    I agree that it is tremendously important to not make the first communications when DD gets home about the D, and also to try to keep them to a reasonable minimum.
     
  9. chbarnes

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    Every evening, I take a look at his Dexcom. I assume you can do the same with most meters. Sometimes he will report a problem, sometimes not. At a CWD conference a CDE with T1 said that diabetes is not even one of the main things a T1 teen thinks about. I try to keep commentary to a minimum.
     
  10. Jordansmom

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    I rely heavily on our dexcom graphs. But I think that's part of our problem. I think Sarah and Wilf are right that the logbook keeps the info less sensitive and impersonal. I look at the Dex graphs and out of context it means almost nothing. If I see a high of 400 then I have to start with the questions. What did you eat for lunch? Are you sure your carb count was right? Did you possibly forget to bolus? Did you eat something between lunch and now you forgot about? Even though I have a great relationship with my DD and I am extra careful about how I ask these kinds of questions, it can still cause strain in our relationship.

    I regret never getting into the habit of logging. But I also wonder if those with kids younger at dx can more easily accept the info as part of managing the disease, when possibly kids dxd as preteens/teens already struggling to gain independence, immediately treat the info gathering as a personal intrusion?
     
  11. nanhsot

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    THIS!! My son definitely treats my asking (but only if he's high) as an intrusion into his personal space. Luckily he's transparent enough that when he's hedging when I ask, I know he's high, I just have to find out HOW high. He readily tells me his good numbers and lows are apparent by the raging hunger...but highs are a bit trickier and he tends to try to hide those somewhat. He treats them, but doesn't own up to them or let me try to problem solve them, he wants to be the expert, but isn't really into doing the research to be the expert, yet.

    Little by little. I watched the video posted from Joe S. and am going to start doing a daily log again, not necessarily with all the carb info (too exhausting, the kid eats constantly!) but only with BG by time, for trends. I may have him watch the video, actually, and then let him know we're starting something new.

    But, yes, you're parting words above are spot on, and I do think it's the crux of our problem.
     
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I think the age at dx question is an interesting one.

    On the one hand, a kid like Maddie, dxd at 4, pretty much has no memory of life before D so the routine of management is sort of imbedded in her being. But she's not blind to what life is life for all her non-D friends, so there's an undercurrent of annoyance that she has to do all the D stuff, while her friends obviously don't and that can, at times, be a tender subject.

    Then, you have the, "know-it-all factor". :rolleyes: Maddie knows her D. She knows it all backward and forward and while it's not yet an issue, we sometimes disagree about how to count or bolus for a food and I just want to grab her pump and do it myself - which raises the other issue which is MY "know-it-all" factor :eek: as in, it can he hard to let go after all these years of doing it for her and doing it my way.

    I think the transition years - from 12-18ish are a long, slow marathon of two steps forward and one step back ... And the only thing that I know that I can be sure of, is that it won't be static, in any way.

    Lastly, on logging. I do think that maintaining a paper log that is out in the open and shared, is a straight forward way of keeping everyone on track and helps somewhat to protect against feelings of shame or secrecy about numbers. It's not perfect, but it works well for us.
     
  13. Trev

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    Lets see, my 13 yr old does pretty well, especially since asking her to report in with her log book and numbers every thursday. This reporting is her all access week end pass for sleep overs, friends and fun. I will check her meter, and get her to text me her number during the day.

    It's a tough age, I remember going thru the teen years as a Type 1, you want help one day and not the other.

    Cheers!
     

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