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Leg waxing question

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Artgirl, Mar 24, 2017.

  1. Artgirl

    Artgirl Approved members

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    My 17 year old daughter wanted to try waxing her legs. I purchased a box of strips for her. When i read the instructions it says not recommended for diabetics. Has anyone ever heard of this? I haven't given them to her yet, but was thinking i better not in case something happens. I was thinking along the lines of damaged skin and healing. Should i give them to her?
     
  2. Christopher

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    I would file this under the same category as people who say that children with Type 1 can't go barefoot outside in the Summer. OF COURSE THEY CAN!!!

    To answer your question, YES, give your daughter the box of strips. Your daughter hasn't even been dealing with this for 2 years yet. There is no reason that she or you should be concerned about "healing" problems. Unless, of course, you have seen clear evidence that she heals slower than usual. This is one of my pet peeves, so forgive me if I am a little heated about it.

    The concern with healing issues, and feet issues, and amputation issues usually arises in people, (usually older people with Type 2), who have severe diabetic neuropathy. This is severe nerve damage that may result after many many years of uncontrolled diabetes. In these cases, people have numbness in their extremities. And as such, if they experience some kind of damage to their feet, for example, and they do not realize they have that cut or damage, and it is left untreated, it can lead to infection.

    I highly doubt your daughter falls into that category. Of course, if she does, you should use the leg waxing with caution. But if not, then let her go for it!! And with Summer right around the corner, I hope all parents of children with Type 1 let their children run free and barefoot.

    #Freethefeet :p
     
  3. Megnyc

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    I waxed various body parts for years and never had any issues. If she has any signs of an infection (usually would be due to an ingrown hair which can also happen with shaving) you want to keep an eye on it and treat it but that is the same with or without diabetes. I only stopped waxing because I got laser (yes you can do laser if you have diabetes) and no longer need to. As a side note, when I would go to places for waxing I would make sure they were super clean, washed their hands, and didn't reuse wax but I would do that even if I didn't have diabetes.
     
  4. Artgirl

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    Thanks for the replies...i'll let her try them out. She really wants to and you are right she is so young i am sure she will be ok.
     
  5. MomofSweetOne

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    I read a study recently that shocked me. It stated that 1/3 of T1D kids have complications by the age of 21. The rates were much lower than kids with T2, but that's still high. Based on that, I understand better why doctors do advise precautions. However, they should also ask about diabetes control rather than assuming complications. My daughter had to go to a podiatrist once, and the dr. assumed she'd have nerve damage. She JAMMED sharp metal needles into my daughter's feet, making my daughter scream in pain (and my daughter has a high pain tolerance!). She didn't even clue in to that, just went on jamming more in just as hard, all while talking to my daughter about herself in the third person, "Dr. Jeannie says you should never wear open shoes or sandals." My daughter climbed into the car and asked, "Who was that lady, and where was the doctor?" She'd never been talked down to in her life like that, so she didn't clue in on the patheticness of talking to a teen (or any child) like that. Needless to say, that doctor made our "never-go-back" list.

    My kid goes barefoot more than she wears shoes. I couldn't keep shoes on her if I tried. Instead, we aim for tight control.

    https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/youth-type-2-diabetes-develop-complications-more-often-type-1-peersd.
     
  6. Christopher

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    That is very surprising. If you can post a link to that study I would like to see it. Making a blanket statement like that makes me question it. 1/3 of how many kids? Were they all diagnosed at the same age? I like to look at all the aspects so I can determine if the findings are valid or not.

    As for that "doctor", I would be tempted to go back and talk to them and let them know how poorly you felt they treated your daughter.
     
  7. joshualevy

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    The previous poster included a link to the NIH press release, here:
    https://www.nih.gov/news-events/new...develop-complications-more-often-type-1-peers
    Which, in turn, included a link to the abstract here:
    http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2606400
    There is a link to the article, but you need to pay to see that.

    To answer your questions, there were about 1,700 people with type-1 diabetes in the study (plus a few hundred with type-2). Those with type-1 had had it for an average of 8 years, and were an average of 18 years old at the end of the study. I did not see any obvious "red flags" in the abstract or in NIH's coverage. You can read the full story for $5.

    I think this research is important for two reasons:
    1. It was published by JAMA, which is the Journal of the American Medical Association (in the US). That means it is going to be read and followed by a lot of general practitioner doctors. It is going to have a wider impact than an article in Diabetes Care or some other specialized, endocrinologist journal.
    2. Many people believe that teenagers have a relatively low rate of complications, but this study comes to the opposite conclusion. It is tempting to just toss out the study, because it seems so different from the rest of the information we have. But it might be that the study is right, and most of information is anecdotal, based on "confirmation bias", or wishful thinking. It might even be that this study is the start of a "sea change" in our beliefs about type-1 complications in the teenage years.

    But how do we know if this study is correct, or if our general belief that teenagers with type-1 do not commonly suffer from complications? For me, the best way is to look at other studies. One study does not resolve an issue, but enough studies, taken together should.

    So a did a quick Google search for "type-1 diabetes complications teenagers" but I only looked at the studies listed there. Here are the first two that I found:

    [r1] Role of blood pressure in development of early retinopathy in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: prospective cohort study
    2008, 1900 people
    "Overall, retinopathy developed in 673 (36%) participants at any time point."
    Study: http://www.bmj.com/content/337/bmj.a918
    Editorial: http://www.bmj.com/content/337/bmj.a770

    [r2] Prevalence of diabetes complications in adolescents with type 2 compared with type 1 diabetes.
    2006, 1400 people
    Retinopathy was 20% in in patients with type 1 diabetes, while microalbuminuria and hypertension were 6% and 16%. Rates of peripheral and autonomic neuropathy were 27 and 61%.
    Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16732012

    So it looks to me like all three of these studies came to the same basic conclusion: that complications are fairly common in teenagers. Of course, it would be better to look at even more studies, and if any one does so, please tell us all what you find.

    Joshua Levy
     
  8. blufickle

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    I don't know if your daughter has waxed her legs yet, but take a look at the ingredients. Some of the waxes contain sugar, so if you purchased a sugar wax that may be why it said not for use for diabetics. My daughter, a non diabetic, had a sugar wax done on her body. They did ask her if she had diabetes before they began.
     
  9. Mish

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    :confused: Sugar isn't absorbed through the skin.
     
  10. kim5798

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    oh for goodness sake! Please if the child wants to WAX, let her! Whether or not she has diabetes should not be a factor. I sincerely doubt sugar is absorbed thru the skin. I am not a doctor. A lot of times when they ask those questions, are you a diabetic is because they are trying to limit their own liability if you have a reaction to the procedure. If she is otherwise healthy, wax the legs!!
     

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