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Kindergarten teacher acts as nurse to diabetic child - legal concerns

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by iteach, May 13, 2010.

  1. iteach

    iteach New Member

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    ..........
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2010
  2. StillMamamia

    StillMamamia Approved members

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    Maybe you could call the ADA about your concerns? I believe their number is 1-800- DIABETES

    Also, Type 1 Diabetes is not a disease you "control". You manage, but even with the best management, it can "get out of control" at times. Especially with a growing child, there will times when BGs just go "up and down". Something to keep in mind.:cwds:
     
  3. frizzyrazzy

    frizzyrazzy Approved members

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    uncontrolled by who's criteria? Having never had any experience with diabetes prior, I wonder from where you're drawing this conclusion?
     
  4. Lee

    Lee Approved members

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    Honestly - it sounds like typical diabetes...

    Our doctor told us upon diagnosis that good control is considered havinf the Blood Sugar in range 50% of the time.

    My 12 yr old tests at school at:
    AM Snack
    Lunch
    Prior to PE
    15 mins before getting on the Bus
    and any other time she deems necessary

    She does this with the nurse. Her pump figures out her corrections and such, but while on shots, the nurse did this. The nurse still logs everything, still calls me, still helps count carbs for school lunches and snacks...etc,etc,etc.

    And once again - she is 12, 6th grade, diagnosed in the 2nd grade.

    I would not say that the girl is uncontrolled, rather, I would address the school board and let them know that you are not a nurse and this is taking away from class time. They need to come up with a solid plan to ensure this child's needs are ,et/
     
  5. liasmommy2000

    liasmommy2000 Approved members

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    I would guess you are protected by some law or the school wouldn't allow it.

    My dd attends a public school in a small district (six schools, around 3,500 students I believe. We do not have a nurse in our district at all, not even part time. Schools however must provide care for students with diabetes and have trained personnel. I have trained many people at dd's school. DD has a diabetes medical management plan and an IEP that includes a school plan for a child with diabetes (accomodations that she needs). I also have made many a check list/instruction sheet for highs and lows, using glucagon etc.

    And I agree. I wouldn't say it's uncontrolled. Highs and lows even on daily basis are just part of Type 1 diabetes. And it's especially hard the younger the child.
     
  6. iteach

    iteach New Member

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    sorry!

    ..........
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2010
  7. sam1nat2

    sam1nat2 Approved members

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    I hope the parents realize what a huge asset you are as their dd's teacher:D

    Diabetes is rough and unpredictable. In case you didn't realize, uncontrollable is a bit offensive, but I can tell you didn't mean it that way.

    As for legal protection, I'd ask the district. Personally I would think it would fall under good samaritan laws.

    Its nice to see a different perspective on here. So often people on here are upset about how things go in school and they want to make sure someone does the care for the kids, that I think parents fail to realize how SCARY it is to have such a HUGE responsibility in looking after not just a kid with diabetes, but an entire class of kids at the same time. As much as parents want the school to handle the insulin administration, people are not always comfortable and can't always handle it as the parents want.

    Sounds like you do a good job and know quite a bit, keep up the good work!
     
  8. tresmom

    tresmom Approved members

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    I think this is a common misconception. People think that going from low to over 500 is abnormal, but honestly with children with type 1 it is more common than most people realize even when the parents are doing everything right. That's why diabetes is such a difficult diagnosis. I am glad that you came here for information. The more you read the more you can help her.
     
  9. Yellow Tulip

    Yellow Tulip Approved members

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    I just want to say that I'm utterly impressed by your willingness to help this little child. You are going out of your way to understand and learn about diabetes, and that's more than many of us can say about many people around us. I really hope that the parents realize what a great teacher/caregiver their child has.

    As for the legality of things, the laws vary state to state as far as administration of insulin goes. I'd talk to the ADA to get the most accurate information.

    Good luck and thank you on behalf of many parents and children with diabetes.:D
     
  10. KitKat

    KitKat Approved members

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    Which state do you live? We could tell you if there is a diabetes law already in place in your state.
     
  11. VinceysMom

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    Personally, I think you are an angel for taking care of this little girl.

    - Kathy
     
  12. bgallini

    bgallini Approved members

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    I think you are doing a great thing here! Being a kindergarten teacher is hard enough but adding on the diabetes care for one of the children is going above and beyong. I'd like to say "Thank you" in case Mom and Dad don't say it often enough.

    I would think that legally, as long as you are doing what you can to follow the plan or following mom's verbal instructions, then you should be fine legally. You may want to review the plan occasionally and maybe ask for it to be made more clear if there are parts that are not clear. Does she have a 504 plan? You may want to ask about getting one for her to make things more legal.

    If you are really concerned, you might consider getting liability insurance. I'm a member of NAEYC and they offer this: http://www.ftj.com/naeyc/mainpage.asp There may be other groups that offer similar coverage. It wouldn't be just for this child but just for coverage for many possible situations when working with young children.

    And feel free to ask more questions about D care in general. Hopefully people can be understanding that you have limited knowledge on this topic. It is certainly possible that the nurse and/or the parents have used the term "uncontrolled"...while it seems rather redundant to me (if their blood sugar stayed in range all the time, they wouldn't have diabetes) and is offensive to some, there are people who use the term.
     
  13. heamwdevine

    heamwdevine Approved members

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    I hope you realize what a GREAT JOB you're doing caring for this child and that is all that really matters. The child and the parents are very lucky to have you!!!

    Like everyone else said, you can't really CONTROL diabetes but do the best you can everyday one blood sugar at a time to manage it and do your best to estimate the carbs as accurately as possible. There are highs and lows and that is just how it is.

    We are very fortunate to have a wonderful teacher like you caring for our daughter and I am so thankful for her everyday as I am sure this child's parents are as well.
     
  14. PAULEEN

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    From a mom with a child with D - I would like to say THANK YOU! I hope the parents appreciate all you do and know how 'good' they have it for having you as a teacher - she is a very lucky girl. :) You are doing a great job and you will learn the 'lingo' over time. I'm also impressed that you have taken it upon your self to come to CWD and ask questions. Check with your school I'm sure they will tell you what you are liable for as their employee.

    Thanks again!
     
  15. Andrew's Mom

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    I think it is GREAT that you want to learn more. Stay with CWD and you will learn. I have learned so much here about caring for my own son.:)
     
  16. Flutterby

    Flutterby Approved members

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    Like others have said, you simply do NOT control diabetes.. you manage it.. My daughter can be (and is often) very high (300+) and very low, (30s) in a single day.. Every thing that little girls does (or doesn't do) effects what her blood sugar is.. just because she's having large bg swings doesn't mean she isn't 'controlled'.. My daughter's daughter actually lists her as 'uncontrolled' at doctor's visits because its easier to get insurance to cover the things we need.

    Second.. you are doing wonders for this little girl and her mom.. My daughter doesn't have a nurse at school, her first grade teacher, the office administration and a para professional take care of her during the day, with most of it falling onto the teacher.. I typically get called 2 or 3 times a day.

    Most parents dont' have any form of medical training.. we all know what we were taught in diabetes education classes.. you learn through doing, the more you do it, the more you will get to know what her body does.. each child is different. If something happened at school and protocal is followed then there shouldn't be any worries.. its when people sit by and do nothing that deeper problems arise.
     
  17. wilf

    wilf Approved members

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    I think you're an angel. :)

    If the girl's blood sugars are swinging that wildly then there is a problem with the insulin regimen.

    I think it's worth talking very neutrally with the parents to see about whether they can be encouraged to get some more help with the D management. It will make your job easier in the long run.
     
  18. Lee

    Lee Approved members

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    Uncontrolled Diabetes is the clinical term for anybody that has an A1C over 7 (this is the three month blood sugar average and not something that you need to really worry about).

    Mom and her Endo team should be working together to adjust insulin dosages so she is not always low or always high at a particular time of day.

    There are a few things that could be going wrong - it could be that her carb dosages are way off. Is she always going low at a certain time of day? Like two hours after snack, is she high or is she low? If so, then Mom should look at that and talk to her team and make a change.

    Also, if she goes low and then swings really high afterward to could be either she is getting to many carbs to correct the low; or her bodies self defense mechanism can be coming into play. The liver will sometimes kick out alot of glucose to bring up blood sugar and this could be happening to her.

    As for the legal issues - that is somethign that you truly need to bring up to your school administrators. I would also say that while I don't think you could be sued, the school definitely could.
     
  19. Lee

    Lee Approved members

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    I personally would be super pissed off if a teacher decided to talk to me about the care I give my child. Especially if I am working my tush off to try and get these swings under control. It is not the teachers place or job or responsibility to address these concerns with the parent. If anybody in the school would, it would be the 1/2 time nurse.

    You and I have no idea, not even a smidgen of a clue, how involved the parent or the endo team is.
     
  20. Flutterby

    Flutterby Approved members

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    100% totally agree here.. it would NOT sit well with me if a teacher/nurse or other school personel came to me about Kaylee's blood sugars.. its NOT their place.

    And to add to it, just because their is wild swings doesn't mean something is wrong.. it just means the factors you thought would play into the dosing and current bg didn't pan out the way you thought they would.
     

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