- advertisement -

keeping teeth healthy while treating lows

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by SarahKelly, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. SarahKelly

    SarahKelly Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Messages:
    1,147
    I am just wondering what you guys use to keep your babes pearly whites healthy. Isaac has at least one low a day and often it's not when we're able to get to a toothbrush after. When I say low I mean between 65-80 with IOB, so I give a little something like a glucose tab or a roll of smarties to keep his BG up. So, Isaac has had a lot of trouble with decay since dx and we have tried everything the dentist suggests (you should see my cupboard of stuff!)...but it doesn't seem to be helping.
    Any ideas?
     
  2. nebby3

    nebby3 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    Messages:
    923
    My dd was also dx at 19 months old. She is almost 11 now so 10 yrs with D almost. So far she has had no cavities. HonestlyI think some people are just more prone to decay and I am not sure D has anything to do with it. Also I think once decay gets in once it is harder to combat.

    I would avoid sticky sweets (which it sounds like you are). Juice boxes with a straw are a good choice especially at night because the juice will hopefully bypass the teeth altogether.

    Beyond that I would look into natural ways to prevent and even reverse decay. I have read a little about such things online and while some of it sounds quacky. There are other bits I would at least try if my child was having lots of problems. Some of it just involves supplanting certain vitamins for example.

    Good luck
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    Maddie has had surface sealing of her teeth - it's been done a few times - and she hasn't had any cavities ( though who knows, maybe the bonding had noting to do with that:rolleyes:)

    Is your son old enough to chew sugarless gum? (obviously not a nighttime solution) I have been advised by my dentist to chew a stick of gum after a meal if I'm out and can't brush. (it sounds so much like quackery that I'm compelled to link http://www.ada.org/1315.aspx)
     
  4. swellman

    swellman Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    Messages:
    3,544
    Molar sealants once.

    Brush twice a day - after breakfast and before bed - adult fluoride toothpaste.

    Tap water probably once per day.

    Occasional juice with straw and occasional tablet at night.

    2 dentist visits per year with cleaning and fluoride treatment.

    Not one cavity.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2013
  5. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    Sealants
    Fluoride treatments at each visit
    Brush if possible after treatment, if not then water and as I always say "a super brush at bedtime"
    Sugar free gum if your child is old enough. Our dentist feels that when brushing isn't an option, then this is a good alternative.
    Avoid chewy snacks (ie. fruit snacks, gummies) as a form of treatment when possible. Our dentist said that the fruit snacks just love to wrap themselves around the teeth and make a home. He likes gels or frosting since they don't bathe the teeth in sugar, just passes by pretty much. So what we do is use that kind of stuff at night when we know that brushing is a challenge (would you want to get up and brush your teeth after treating a low:eek::D)


    Both my kids have had cavities, this is with brushing fairly diligently. I think some people are just more prone to it. We have found though that cutting down on the amount of chewy snacks has definitely helped avoid more cavities.
     
  6. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    Another big fan of sealants here. Actually, both kids' teeth have been sealed.

    We also avoid almost all gummy snacks and treats, and would never use them at night.
     
  7. manda81

    manda81 Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Messages:
    670
    Our kiddos both have sealants as well, and our dentist recommends having them just do a water rinse (or drink water) after tabs/juice.
     
  8. Lakeman

    Lakeman Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2010
    Messages:
    956
    My child has had one cavity and it was a doozy. She ended up having the tooth removed. Fortunately it was a baby tooth and will be replaced by an adult tooth later. In any case as a result I have learned a lot about tooth care.

    We attempt to rinse after sugary treatments. Even at night she can sip her apple juice and follow it with some water while mostly asleep. Previously in the daytime we had her rinse with tea thinking it was slightly alkaline but have since learned that we were wrong - tea is acidic. (p.s. filtered water is acidic too. Mineral water would be alkaline)

    Last year she had leg cramps and night terrors which have both resolved since she started taking magnesium tablets. (we asked the pediatrician for the correct dose and the clinic follows up when we visit to check the dose) The magnesium works like a charm for both issues. Why did I bring this up? Because I read online that some people get cavities as a result of an insufficiency of magnesium. And since the dentist told us that there is no way a child who brushes regularly could get the kind of cavity she had just from being treated for lows there "has to be" some other explanation for the cavity.

    Yes, I too have heard that sugar free gum could help. We don't eat sugar free products but that could be helpful for those that do. Also I have heard one can brush without toothpaste and get 80% of the benefits of brushing with toothpaste. That lathery foam in the toothpaste does nothing for you. The abrasive action certainly cleans teeth but should not be done in a window ten to 20 minutes after eating because then it is more like scrubbing your countertop with acid - better to brush right away before the enamel has softened or wait until the acids have been neutralized by saliva. Saliva is a great medium for bathing teeth but it takes up to four hours to really completely do its job and if you eat in the meantime then it has to start over - another good reason to space meals apart rather than to graze all day. I suspect that saliva cannot do its job well if the body does not have the proper nutrients to keep its PH just right. I think the body uses minerals like magnesium to do this.

    Not that any of us want to hear this but I read that insulin (any kind) in excess can result in low magnesium levels. Basically that means that the more carbs one eats the more of a chance that one will not have enough magnesium. This works in two ways. 1. our body uses lots and lots of magnesium to use insulin and process carbs and 2. insulin causes calcium retention and calcium is antagonistic to magnesium. That's kind of hard to believe so I googled a bit and here is one link:
    http://preventdisease.com/news/12/090712_18-Causes-of-Mineral-Depletion.shtml
     
  9. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,739
    Along the lines of what Lakeman said, high BGs (which our kids all have) drain electrolytes out of the body. Our endo team told us this at one visit, but here's a link that talks about it: http://www.livestrong.com/article/353569-electrolyte-imbalance-in-diabetes/ When the electrolytes are out of balance, the body's pH is affected. When pH is affected, BGs are much harder to control. It can be a vicious circle, but when we keep an eye on my daughter's pH, her diabetes is much easier to manage.

    My daughter has had no cavities (yet). I, however, had one that needed filled and another one that was just starting. Our dentist told me he didn't want to touch the starting one and to go home and google on remineralizing teeth. I'm thankful that he recommended intervening before drilling when he didn't feel it was necessary yet. http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/oral-care/procedures/remineralization-of-teeth.htm
     
  10. swellman

    swellman Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    Messages:
    3,544
    Tap water from municipal supplies is almost always alkaline.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2013
  11. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2005
    Messages:
    3,835
    I honestly think a lot of it is genetics.

    Neither child has ever had a cavity and the dentist says they are always the cleanest teeth they see all year. (We've been treating lows at night for almost 12 years, since Carson was 9 months old.)

    We do:
    Sealants
    No fluoride treatments, but did give them fluoride drops for the few years before we lived in an area with fluoridated water.
    Brush 2x day
    Floss at night about 50% of the time (but that didn't happen regularly until Carson got braces a year ago.)

    My mom swears by having fluoride as a baby, either in drops or in tap water if you live in an area that has it. I know it's controversial with some people, but it's worked for us (and many many others we know.)
     
  12. Lovemyboys

    Lovemyboys Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2010
    Messages:
    296
    I believe this is due to the xylitol. Tooth decay has been explained to me like this: It's not the sugar that causes decay, it's a certain bacteria that feed on the sugar that cause the decay, due to acid production. If you don't have that bacteria, then there won't be decay, no matter how much sugar is in your mouth or on your teeth. Xylitol is a sugar alcholol, the bacteria eat it, thinking it's food, then die. You don't have to eat the xylitol, there are mouthwashes and toothpaste that have it.

    Here's a link:
    http://www.dentist.net/xylitol-teeth.asp
     
  13. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    5,560
    My son was dx'd at 3 yr 10 months and at age 4.5 he went to the dentist for the first time. He had 14 cavities.

    The dentist fixed all the problems and sealed his teeth. He has had one cavity since. Since he is 19, he has lost all his baby teeth, but the permanent ones were sealed as well.
     
  14. ecs1516

    ecs1516 Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    Messages:
    7,028
    My youngest was diagnosed at 10 months 13 years ago. My oldest was diagnosed at 3 years old , 13 years ago. My oldest is now 16 and had his first cavity last year. Other son has not had any. We went to a dentist many yeasr ago when my youngest was 3 and he said he had three cavities and would have to put him to sleep to do them. They could not show me the cavities on the xray. Found new dentist that I love even closer to home. He said not real cavities and just did some light sanding. Put on sealants. That son has never had a real cavity. Both children has always had sealants even on baby teeth since going to new dentist. We had to pay for them but well worth it in my opinion. They use a Braun toothbrush sometimes instead of their regular one. Use Crest . Use ACT fluoride .

    They use to get juice boxes during the night for lows. Now glucose tablets. I always follow with a little water in a paper cup. I bend the cup and pour a little in their mouth and drink it. But they have been used to doing this for years.

    They brush their teeth twice a day. No sodas except a small sprite can for youngest about once a week at most.
     
  15. SarahKelly

    SarahKelly Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Messages:
    1,147
    as always you guys are a wonderful wealth of invaluable knowledge. We have paid out of pocket for sealants and have tried several suggested ideas. I am going to give a few more a try.
    Also, here is my other question - if it is a bacterial issue, could it be reversed through diet? supplements?
    It seems that both my husband and I have the cruddy genes for getting cavities easily, we are both thorough cleaners and use natural products along with not consuming foods that stick in teeth...so that is definitely part of what we're dealing with here.
    Thanks again :)
     
  16. Lakeman

    Lakeman Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2010
    Messages:
    956
    yes, it is a bacteria issue. A few posts up someone said that the sugar free gum helps with bacteria - I don't know, hopefully. I have heard that coconut oil has antibacterial properties for this kind of bacteria. But just how effective would it be? Once I had in infection and used a mouthwash that was an antibiotic - I had the cleanest teeth for about a week, but you can't keep taking antibiotics. I doubt you could reverse the growth of bacteria with diet. Even if you cut out all sugar and wheat it would still be there though I can tell you from experience that this lessens it.

    I have read just a little about probiotics like yogurt being of help. Not so sure since I eat probiotic foods everyday and still need to brush quite a bit to keep things clean.

    From what I understand the sealants only work on the crevices of the teeth like on molars. They do not work on the smooth sides or chewing surfaces.

    Stories you may have heard about cavities being reversed through diet are only true if they are very small and have not penetrated into the second layer of teeth and only if the diet is something that someone might eat if they lived in the amazon jungle.
     
  17. swellman

    swellman Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    Messages:
    3,544
    ... or just follow the advice of your dentist ... they tend to know what's what about cavities.
     
  18. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    Yes, then there's that ;)
     
  19. SarahKelly

    SarahKelly Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Messages:
    1,147
    except, like so many other aspects of diabetes, not everybody gets it - my son's pediatric dentist had no clue that we checked at night nor that we would need to treat lows at night. When I told her about this she asked why we wouldn't just brush again after even if it took several checks every 15 min until he cam up...so, yes let's ask the dentist.
    makes about as much sense as asking the pediatrician to help with my son's skin issues with his pump
    which leads me to the dermatologist
    which leads me to the wound care specialist
    who recommended I talk to the endocrinologist
    and she again said she doesn't specialize in skin problems and I should ask the pediatrician.
    SO,
    I came on here where I usually get good advice based on peoples life experience.
    If you don't have anything to add...than don't! Why do people feel the need to comment if they aren't adding to the discussion?
     
  20. Ali

    Ali Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,219
    I feel your pain...As a long time T1 it is a bit of a catch 21 all the time. My Dentist happens to have a best friend who is a T1 so he gets it but most of them you just have to dictate it to. Just for some info when I was first diagnosed the endo you worked with did all your primary, then they switched to having a primary and endo and all your other specialists. There is a plus and a minus to each system. The real trick is just finding one really good Doc who can work with you for many years. I now find the issue to be that docs switch clinics so often that I am lucky to get five years from any one primary or endo, and frankly most of my Docs are not very good...You really do need to do your own research. Sorry...but this is ater forty years in the business. :cwds::cwds::cwds:ali
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice