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It looks like my little boy has diabetes

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Joel K, Mar 20, 2012.

  1. Joel K

    Joel K Approved members

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    I know everything will be ok, but you just go through these phases of thinking it is all good and then it hits you again, but my son is doing real good and that is the priority. Once I finally get some good sleep I am sure it will get better.
     
  2. Becky Stevens mom

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    Oh Joel, I am so very sorry for your loss:( I have always felt like my son's diagnosis was very much like a loss. I did go into mourning after that but was also very frightened and angry and sad. Its a loss of "normalcy" I guess. What you thought was just going to be your normal day to day life isnt anymore, and it makes you angry and makes you feel like you want to go back in time to the normal easy days before. I know youre not going to believe me, yet. You will have those normal days again. You and your boy are going to have days where you take care of the diabetes just like him brushing his teeth and then get out and do the things you have always enjoyed doing whether its fishing or going to the baseball game. Youll do those things and bring along the diabetes stuff and pretty much concentrate on the weather being perfect for the fish to bite and where are you going to get some bait. For a time though, your mind will be full of diabetes. Each day youll learn a bit more, youll feel a little more comfortable giving a shot or making a decision about how much insulin your son needs or should you give him 4 oz of juice for a low or 2. And youll be able to think about his future and what it holds for him, what his dreams are and how you can help him to achieve those dreams. For now, you be patient with yourself. Youre doing just fine and so is he :cwds:
     
  3. DsMom

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    I'm glad your son is doing well. Keep in touch with him about his feelings so he knows he does not have to put on a brave front all of the time. Letting those inevitable negative feelings out is important in dealing with D.

    And you've certainly hit the nail on the head with this post. D is like this a lot. Long stretches of things going fine...and then a road bump...and this is true for physical things such as BG levels, and emotionally. We've been at this for 3 1/2 years, and I still have days (rare now) when it hits me with fresh intensity. I've learned to roll with the punches...as it seems you are doing very well...and know that the dark hours will pass and the sun will shine again!:)

    You seem to have a realistic attitude and great perspective on this. You will be on a rollercoaster for a while...but it's not forever. Your son is lucky to have you in his corner.
     
  4. DsMom

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    Also wanted to add that I can so relate and remember well when a 71 (or even something in the 80s) on the meter would freak me out.:cwds: You learn (and they didn't really tell me at the hospital) that 70 is not the edge of a cliff that your son will fall off of and end up passing out. Low BG is generally gradual (barring things like exercise or incorrect insulin dosage), with warning signs. 70 is the number at which action must be taken...but no need to panic. My son had a 33 this past summer, his lowest ever, and was walking around and talking as he normally does. Some glucose tablets and a bit of time later...he was fine...and excited that he hit a new "record" on his meter:rolleyes:. My adult niece with D said she hit 22 and could treat herself without confusion. Every person with D is different and will feel low symptoms at different numbers and with different intensity.

    Only telling you this because I wish someone had told me after dx not to panic at 70.;) I barely blink at a 70 now, and even the 42 we saw the other night just prompted treatment, not fear. You will get there with experience and education!:)
     
  5. Tamara Gamble

    Tamara Gamble Approved members

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    I am so sorry that this has happened to your family. That being said, we were all there at one time and are here to help you today. I'm not on here very much anymore but there are so many regulars that you are always covered. I can't speak for everyone else but I remember when my son was diagnosed. I was freaked out to put it mildly! I was terrified that I would do something wrong. I wanted him home but was terrified to bring him there. I wondered how he got this disease. I cried at my preconceived notions about the future. I haggled with how we were going to pull all of this off. I mourned the loss of what we had once known as life. The list is endless. Six and a half years later I'm going to say these things: We're good. We're well adjusted. I don't really care genetically where this came from (who's fault it is or praying to God it wasn't me), I just want a cure for his sake and for yours. My son is and will always be healthy because we continuously educate ourselves, we work hard at this thing as a family, and he does as he should (most of the time). This is not an exact science so don't expect exact results, be flexible. People are ignorant! They have no understanding of type 1 diabetes, they think it's type 2 and will tell you everything you are doing wrong and how they would handle it. Ignore their ignorant comments and educate them to decrease the stupid remarks that you will hear. People are awesome! People who have this disease are the best people that I know. They educate, they have big shoulders, they laugh and they cry with you, they learn from each other, they will teach you everything you need to know to get through this. They pay it forward every single day. Things will get better. You will learn so much over the next year, and as another poster said, that as you move along the things that once caused you to shake you won't even blink at. You're overwhelmed, you will be for a while but it will all straighten out. You will look back on this moment and cry sometimes and at other times you will celebrate all of the accomplishments that your child and your family have achieved. Everything is a win no matter how small. Badshoe/Bennet has a great blog. Find it, go to it regularly, live by it. He balances everything with humor. I'm suggesting this especially because you are both males and he can help you greatly. Funniest and saddest story I have ever read was his daughter Delaney's diagnosis on his blog. I read it shortly after my son was diagnosed. It changed my perspective about this disease. Fear, you will have it but you must overcome this part. The first sleepover is rough but you have to let them go. There are going to be bumps in the road but be an example for him and remember they're just bumps. Don't let this disease define him or you for that matter. Best piece of advice ever given to me: Have a plan for everything. Do it now, so that when an emergency arises you don't have to think. Eventually it will become second nature but for now plan ahead. School, sports, home, grandparents house=Training, supplies, binders. Section 504 ADA for school, JDRF for outreach in your area. Keep us posted! Good luck to you! By the way, my son was diagnosed when he was 10 (right before his birthday), he will be 18 this year. Tonight is soccer practice 30 minutes away. He drives himself, he packs his supplies ( I still check them), he has confidence in his abilities to manage this disease, because we empowered him, and he is the best person that I know. This disease does not define him. Last but not least: You're going to make mistakes. We all do. Don't beat yourself up, do better next time.
     
  6. VinceysMom

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    My son said the same about his hospital stay at Rainbow in Cleveland... he loved ordering "room service."

    You are a great Dad and it sounds like you have been doing a wonderful job caring for your son. In regard to carb ratios and corrections, I have charts posted EVERYWHERE, home ON cupboards, in cupboards, at work, in book bags, purses, wallets, with every carb ratio possible, and with our correction sliding scale.. i am HORRIBLE at math and it really helps to have this info handy without having to do the math! :eek: I also carry around a small calculator, just in case...:eek: I even started an excel spreadsheet with all his favorite foods and fast foods so we know off hand to just look at this chart to find the counts... and now we know Subway and McDonald's almost by heart:eek: And also, i am rambling of course, we are on Facebook with a lot of parents of children with diabetes, and if we are out and need a carb count, I send a text to my facebook and ask, "ok, how many carbs in a mcdonalds shamrock shake" and someone always comes back with the count.. (i don't have a smart phone!)... :)

    Best wishes to you and your entire family.

    Kathy
     
  7. suz

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    Just want to ditto this. Cooks in Ft Worth is amazing. What doctor are you seeing?

    Also, I wanted to let you know about a local support group for families of T1s (FOTOD) in the N Texas area. If you PM me I can give you more info. We have a Yahoo group and a Facebook group. We get together regularly, which is great for the kids - and us parents! You may have received a flyer about it in your blue JDRF Bag of Hope.
     

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