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is your teen self conscious with D?

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Omo2three, Jul 27, 2010.

  1. Omo2three

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    I was curious if you noticed them trying to hide it more now that they are in HS and hanging out more with friends...

    I hear this is a challenge for teens to stay focused on d care (BG checks, diet- carb counting, dosing) during adolescence.

    recently we were offered a class for teens at our endo clinic to handle new challenges of D ...called Transition class ~adolescence to adulthood.
     
  2. VinceysMom

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    We are still pretty new at this, and yes, he is self-conscious. Doesnt want to do BG checks in front of kids (unless they are here at home visiting, etc). He will only check and do injections if they are his "good" friends...otherwise, he tries to hide it all:( If we don't stay on top of him via cell when he is with friends, I'm not sure he would check his BG..and then he gets mad that we are always texting him when he is out...:(
     
  3. Heather(CA)

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    So far so good, I hope Seth stays open...Time will tell :)
     
  4. kiwimum

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    Tyler is pretty open but when we moved this year and he started at a new high school, he expressed that he didn't want anyone to know. He told me it was because he couldn't be bothered with answering all the questions that come when kids see him doing his 'thing'.
    I guess he wanted to fit in with the new kids and not seem like a freak.:(

    But we did suggest that he tell at least one kid so that someone was aware and knew what to do. Of course once one kid knew, the whole school knew and no one bats an eyelid now. In fact, they come to his defence when a relief teacher tells him off for eating in class, be it jelly beans for a low or a snack cause his bg is dropping.:)

    When he's out and about, he doesn't give two hoots about doing his D stuff and having people stare. I just hope it continues to be that way.
     
  5. nanhsot

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    My son is surprisingly not self conscious at all, very confident and open with it, in fact he usually asks if anyone wants to see what he's doing. He often turns his syringe into a little water pistol, so sometimes he plays with his supplies, which is probably totally inappropriate (universal precautions and all that jazz). In a photo from a restaurant at the beach, I can see the syringe behind his ear, a la James Dean, pretty funny.

    What I do find, when hanging out with friends, is he forgets a lot, just slips his mind to check before he eats, that sort of thing. So for him it's less about hiding and more about distraction, and that's a worry.

    My son is not in public school, we homeschool, so we don't have the cool at school worries.
     
  6. Kaylas mom

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    Kayla has been really good about it so far. She will test with no problems. Her biggest hurdle is that she needs complete silence to do the shots and sometimes if we are eating out, she just wants me to do them because it makes her nervous to have people up walking around near her.
     
  7. Lawana

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    Dd is self-conscious in public. She puts the meter on her lap and looks around to see if anyone is looking. Fortunately, with the meter being the remote for the Ping, she can also bolus at the same time, or she hands me the meter to bolus for her.
    I'm not aware of her skipping a bg check or bolus due to self-consciousness.
     
  8. mommyof5

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    Kaley is. That's why we're not pumping. She doesn't want people to see it. She has grown up so much in the past 6 months that in hoping it won't be long and she'll want one.
     
  9. kimmcannally

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    Does she know about the option of getting a Ping or an Omnipod? You don't have to pull out a pump with those - just use the remote to bolus. I believe the Omnipod remote contains a BG meter and I know the Ping does. It really looks no different than just checking her BG and that has to be done anyway.

    They can be totally concealed :)
     
  10. Lucky 868

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    My son, 16, is not self-conscious about his diabetes at all. He tests and injects (uses an insulin pen) at the table in restaurants (tries to be especially discrete if there are little kids around in case the needle is scary to them) or wherever he happens to be. Like Nancy, my son was homeschooled so we didn?t have to deal with classroom issues. However, because he was part of our high school?s Varsity baseball team he did have to deal with diabetes care in front of his friends from the very beginning and it has never been a problem. Because he was diagnosed during the team?s Easter tournament and, for the first time ever, missed a baseball event, :( the coach told the team that Nick was in the hospital and had been diagnosed with diabetes and would be taking insulin shots. He received nothing but supportive texts from his friends and when he returned to the field he gave the team a rundown of what he does. Their biggest concern was if he'd still be able to have sunflower seeds during the games. He never had to face the ?how do I tell my friends? question. Family and neighbors already knew when we got home, so there have been very few people he?s had to ?announce? (his word) it to. Nick starts community college next month and will tell his teachers about diabetes the first day of class. I think he?ll a little nervous about that - having to repeat the information and worrying a little if teachers will give him a hassle about drinking/eating in class. I?m sure it will go smoothly. :)
     
  11. pianoplayer4

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    my dd does not care if people see her test/inject sh edoes however try to be a mindful of the fact that most people don't like to watch so she does it quick and not in the open if she can. one place she wont pull out her meter is stores i think its cause she always likes to sit down while she's checking:)
     
  12. LizinTX

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    No he isn't self conscious about it, but he does tend to "forget" about checking himself unless he is eating, or bolusing afterwards--but it truely is a forgetful thing and not a he's-trying-to-hide-it thing.

    At the theme park this past Sunday, he was with his friends, and when he would see me--in front of everyone--he would take off his pump and wave it in the air, knowing that would flag me down, so that I could hang onto his pump while he rode the rides.:rolleyes:
     
  13. sugarmonkey

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  14. MissEmi

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    I'm not very self-conscious about it...D is part of me, and I have always followed the whole "be myself" thing. If D turns people off, then they probably wouldn't like me anyway, and they're not worth being my friend. But that's my opinion. A lot of kids are afraid that it will be different if people knew, but in my case, nobody really cared that I had D. I was still Emily, with or without it (I'm not saying that they like totally ignore it or anything, they just accepted it).
    I didn't lose any friends over it, and that's probably why I feel like I do now.
     
  15. Omo2three

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    Excellent point...its good to see so many of our teens are confident and can just be themselves...d and all!

    I like that!

    I have never seen Ambrea hide her D, but I have to agree she does get distracted quite easily!
     
  16. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    I'm not self conscious generally (and I'm not a teen) but in places where you're not supposed to use a cell phone I don't like to check my blood sugar. Particularly in the synagogue on the sabbath. I had a former middle school teacher (religious day school) see me checking blood sugar three years ago. The conversation went like this:

    Her: Jonah, I never thought you would do something like that! Well, you are an adult now....
    Me: What? Do what? What did I do?! [can you tell she was my middle school teacher?]
    Her: Use a cell phone on shabbat!
    Me: It's not a cell phone, it's a glucometer! I have diabetes now!
    Her: Oh! I shouldn't have been so quick to judge. I'm so sorry.

    I don't want people to think I'm somebody who texts in situations where it's inappropriate, and not everybody is going to let me know what they're thinking and give me a chance to change their opinion of me.

    But I inject everywhere.
     
  17. Danielle2008

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    I do most things in private.

    Truth be told, I don't like doing site changes, and rarely do BG checks in front of my own parents. My mom even asked me a few months back if I was testing. I told her, of course, and even showed her my meter so she would 'know' I was. She responded that she just never sees me do it anymore. I told her just because she doesn't see me physically doing it, doesn't mean I am not.

    I don't hide it out of embarrassment or lack of confidence. I choose to do things in private as I don't want my family or friends to worry. It may not make much sense, but that is how I think.

    All my co-workers and my friends know I have Diabetes. If they ask me a question, I don't mind talking about it. In fact, I enjoy moments to educate.

    However, when it comes to the day to day treatment of my Diabetes....That is my personal thing.
     
  18. jilmarie

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    This is exactly how I feel as well. You said it perfectly!
     
  19. Omo2three

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    Thanks for sharing that info... I can see your a private person and still very confident in who you are. It is very considerate of you to think of your parents in that way. Honestly from a mom's point of view, just seeing my dd test doesn't worry me...and I like that we can be open about things...it is my parenting style.
    I was curious how you test in private when in public? For example at a county fair, or at a restaurant, in a classroom, and other public places.

    curious how you manage to be subtle....I know Ambrea will test on her lap...no big deal. It is still in public but less noticeable.

    again...its good to see your perspective on D...I would not of thought about it in that way. You choose to be quiet about it ...so those you love don't worry or stress over it. Normalizes things. Very good Point! :)
     
  20. Danielle2008

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    I test in my purse when out and about. I do it so quickly, I think most think I am just digging around for something in it (which wouldn't be all that unusal for me to begin with).

    This is not to say I ALWAYS test that discreetly. I will test in front of family and friends at times, but when I can I try to do it more privately.

    I should mention that I am very close to my family as well. We talk open about most things, and always have. It is just the constant Diabetes related things I choose to remain more private about.

    I was diagnosed at roughly 18, so from the get go I have always felt it was my responsibility. This was not put on to me by family or friends, I have a very supportive family in that sense. I feel this way more so about my mom. Up until my diagnoses, as a family, we had dealt with some pretty constant, and difficult things(with 5 kids ranging from 20-38 years old, there always seems to be one of us having a life crisis:rolleyes:). At diagnoses my first thought was, "Oh not another thing for her to worry about."

     

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