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Is getting a CGM worth it if son is active?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by gkwzcohen, Mar 11, 2016.

  1. gkwzcohen

    gkwzcohen Approved members

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    My almost 13yo does Brazilian Jiu Jitsu 3x week. I would probably have to remove the CGM each time and replace after. That means 3 x a week we would have to replace it on him and use 3 every week. He was just diagnosed about 5 weeks ago. He has been getting a lot of lows right before bed. The lows range from 50-70. The lows have been really upsetting him as he feels sick to his stomach and gets weak legs. Last night he went from 69 to 52 in 10 minutes. I don't know how expensive the CGMs are and if insurance would pay for 3 per week.
     
  2. rgcainmd

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    I'm not understanding why you would need to remove the CGM. My daughter does EVERYTHING while wearing her CGM.
     
  3. Snowflake

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    Mine too -- swimming, gymnastics, skiing, and on and on. I'd suggest the original poster check out Dexcom's website, so you can see how small and low-profile it is.

    With some activities, depending on where the receiver is stowed, how much motion is involved, etc, you might lose data for a while. This can be kind of a bummer, because CGM data is seriously addictive! But losing data for a few minutes is not the same things as having to remove the senor.
     
  4. scarral

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    Yeah my son is a very active 4 yo, thanks to that he has ripped of his catheter a couple of times, but the sensor has always stayed there. About the data, I've noticed that if the pump is far and it can't receive data from the sensor (while swimming for instance) the sensor's transmitter stores the data and sends it over to tbe pump when the connection resumes. This is also true after switching the flight mode off. We have the Minimed 640g with Enlite sensor.
     
  5. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Yeah, all our kids spend their days on fainting couches...
    No, insurance will not cover the very expensive sensors to the tune of 3 per week, nor should they. The vast majority of the kids on this site are "active" and they manage to CGM just fine.
     
  6. sszyszkiewicz

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  7. Sprocket

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    If you get the right adhesive, you will find the sensors have a long life - we get over 2 weeks out of ours. We just had 1 sensor live nicely though a week of swimming at the beach/pool/Atlantis, which I was very impressed with.
    Now that we have a CGM, I hope to never be without one again. The information is provides and the comforting peace of mind (and sleep) it allows us is priceless.
     
  8. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    I am loving this response from Sarah, on several levels.



    ETA: If my assumption that Brazilian jiu jitsu is the same thing as Capoeira (or even similar to it for that matter), then you simply must watch the episodes of "Bob's Burgers" in which Capoeira is featured for a good laugh.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2016
  9. Snowflake

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    To the original poster: jump in if these responses don't make sense, or if you'd like more clarification. For what it's worth, when my child was a month post-diagnosis, I had absolutely no idea how CGM functioned, what it looked like, or the advantages it offered.

    Unfortunately, endos don't typically explain CGM as an option to newly diagnosed families, which is a real shame. It can be such a game changer, in terms of both learning about bg patterns and managing diabetes. Like many families on CWD, I learned about CGM from social media and had to educate myself and then push for a provider letter and for insurance coverage to get it. The good news: my sense is that insurance coverage is slowly becoming the norm. Good luck!
     
  10. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Does he do this naked? If not, you can probably find a way to site and cover the sensor so that won't be an issue. Lots of kids. lots of sports, many cgm.
     
  11. Beach bum

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    If my kids are doing something that they think may interfere with their CGM (for example, Wellness class had a ropes component), they will think about where they are going to place it. For example, if the harness will get in the way, that week they will stick to arms. But if it's something else, they may move to stomach or legs.

    IMHO, if you take off the sensors frequently a)you're kid will hate you. It doesn't hurt, but it isn't comfortable b)your insurance will most likely not cover so many c)your doctor probably won't encourage a CGM at this time if you need to pull them so many times.

    For my second daughter, we got a CGM two weeks post diagnosis, but that's because we already had my other daughter on one. We did find it incredibly helpful in the beginning.
     
  12. gkwzcohen

    gkwzcohen Approved members

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    Thank you all for your advice. We are very new to all this as you might be able to tell. BJJ is very physical-Lots of grabbing of arms, legs, throwing on backs and stomachs, flipping from one side to the other. Think UFC/MMA without the punches. I've watched the YouTube on Dexcom but I'll be watching more and looking at the videos the other poster recommended. We have an appointment in 2 weeks with Endo so we'll discuss again. The lows are real scary-he was 39 last night. Do you ever get over the fear of lows? Thanks again!!
     
  13. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    My daughter's Dexcom CGM (and more time and experience trying to manage T1D) allowed me to get over about 85% of my fear of lows. Low BGs are, unfortunately, not completely unavoidable if you don't want your CWD to run perpetually high...
     
  14. Nancy in VA

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    Separate from the CGMs conversation, he's a newly diagnosed with a lot of lows - I'm thinking honeymoon. You definitely need to call the Endo to probably lower his insulin for a while.
     
  15. sszyszkiewicz

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    At 5 weeks into a diagnosis that is a great question. It shows that you realize there are dangers you have to manage, precautions you need to take.

    The answer is "yes" you get passed "fear". It is replaced with a healthy "respect" for diabetes and the effects of insulin. The fastest way to get from fear to respect is learning as much about management of T1D as fast as you can and then seeing how T1D works with your son.


    If you are seeing alot of lows you should get in touch with your team for adjustments.

    Good luck!
     
  16. Snowflake

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    The extra description helps, thanks, but it's hard for me to imagine any sanctioned youth sport being so physical as to rule out CGM. I've met parents who felt that high school football ruled out pumping, but I seem to recall that they were still able to use Dexcom.

    For high-contact sports, you'll discover that the pharmacy has shelves worth of adhesive products to experiment with. Most active kids don't just rely on the CGM's tape to keep the CGM attached to their bodies. For example, when we know that my daughter will be swimming, we use both a wipe-on adhesive called Skin-Tac, and we also tape over the transmitter with either Opsite Flex Fix or HypaFix medical tapes. For dd's winter activities, we just use the additional tape. We arrived at this routine through months of trial and error and through soliciting advice from other D parents. I hope this helps!
     
  17. njswede

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    Full contact American football wasn't a problem for Noah. If he wears it on his arm and you're really worried, I'd get one of those elastic supportive "socks" you can buy for a few dollars in any sports store and pull it over the sensor. There are HUGE benefits to wearing a sensor during practice and games. If my son goes low during a game, he's basically done with that game. The CGM helps with that.
     
  18. dpr

    dpr Approved members

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    You may need to find a strategic place to put the sensor but it will well be worth it!! CGM's are a complete game changer in diabetes care. And yes, you get used to lows. Fortunately with the cgm you see them coming and you can usually be proactive and treat them before they get to be a problem. They should send everyone home with a cgm. They are a huge increase in safety and stress reduction!
     
  19. georgia

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    For what it is worth, diving for bases in baseball rips cgms out of the stomach almost every time. I think your initial question was valid. Definitely get the cgm and then do some research and figure out how to keep it in. CGMs are awesome. Good luck!
     

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