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Interview with Kris Freeman after the 30k race in the Olympics

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by Mom2rh, Feb 25, 2010.

  1. Mom2rh

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  2. Flutterby

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    Love this quote:
    and this one

    and
    We need to let him know that is is MOST DEFINITELY a role model for our kids and all people with T1.


    here's another great article on Kris.

    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/olympics/2010/writers/david_epstein/02/23/freeman.diabetes/index.html
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2010
  3. Toni

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    It is so unfortunate that this happened during the Olympics. I must confess I was quite worried about the basal rate he was using to combat highs; but he knew what he was doing. It would be great if he wore cgms for all races. I feel bad that he made that comment about not feeling like much of a role model. Finishing the race anyway, even when you know you cannot win, that kind of determination makes him a better role model than if he had just won the race. I hope he can still win Olympic gold.
     
  4. Flutterby

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    Do you know what basal rate he used? not sure why you're worried:confused:
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2010
  5. danismom79

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    What basal rate was he using? I'm reading the post from the first link, where he said he used the same one he used for a similar race. It seems like he realized it was too high after the fact. Which article are you looking at?
     
  6. MamaC

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    Whether Kris wins bronze, silver or gold, or no medal at all...the WIN is in the fact that he chugs along in spite of his disease, on an international stage. IMO, he may be doing just as much (or more) as a role model by showing that diabetes management is not a perfect science, as he would if he were cruising to unchallenged, unaffected by disease GOLD every race.

    We all tell our kids they can do and be anything they want, despite their disease. What sometimes falls by the wayside is the fact that sometimes, even often, the path to the end needs to be modified. We don't know precisely what Kris is doing to better enable his body to compete. My son's experience is that he often has to tweak something for same events, different days. It's a process.

    I applaud Kris for living it out in front of the world.
     
  7. Mikker

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    Very well put, Becky!! Here~Here~!
     
  8. caspi

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    Very well said, Becky! :)
     
  9. emm142

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    It's very interesting that when he's not under high activity he only checks BG twice per day, and still maintains an A1C in the 5s.. Such a shame this happened in the olympics, but he's still a great role model.
     
  10. hrermgr

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    The fact that he is an Olympic athlete makes him a role model! I read one article about him that stated cross country skiers are probably the MOST fit athletes in any sport. So the fact at he can compete at the Olympics and has type 1 D is simply amazing!!!
     
  11. StillMamamia

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    Yeah, I thought that was weird. Guess, like he mentioned, he goes low-carb, so maybe he doesn't need to test as often.:confused: And he's a grown man, so he may notice all the subtle changes in his body better than a young kid or a teen would.:confused:

    I'm also surprised that he still doesn't have a CGMS.

    In any case, his story is inspiring.
     
  12. lil'Man'sMom

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    yep... What MamaC said!
     
  13. lil'Man'sMom

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    I think this is the case, he is SO in tune to his body.
     
  14. Toni

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    The basal rate used to combat highs was 5 units an hour. :eek: But he had tested this one out with much success.
     
  15. Flutterby

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    Curious where you read this (link?).. and he's a grown man.. his needs are different than what a child's or preteen's is.
     
  16. frizzyrazzy

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    I like that he IS a role model. Not all our kids are going to be great Olympic athletes but they ARE going to do what he did ; stumble and have a setback with their BG. And I hope and pray that my child and every child here does what he did - get right back up and keep going. THAT is the lesson I want my child to have.

    He may not be a gold medal winner, but because he's not, he has become a bigger hero to us than he ever would have been had he won.
     
  17. vettechmomof2

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    My daughter met him at camp last summer and was so happy to hear about him this year. She was sad for him in this years Olympics but said," SOmetimes things like this happen no matter how hard you try not to let it".
    She def. feels he is still a strong role model.
     
  18. Toni

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    The five units an hour for that particular type of race, it is on his blog. I read he had tested the amount in a similar type of race and it worked well. I don't think there is a Type 1 man alive who would need five units an hour. He needs so much temporarily to combat the extreme adrenaline highs. And different amounts for different types of races. And that is scary because you cannot absolutely predict what your body is going to do every time. These extreme athletes.... I wish they would all wear cgms; it would be safer.
     
  19. Flutterby

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  20. danismom79

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    I had to dig pretty deep for it, but I found it:

    http://blogs.fasterskier.com/krisfreeman/2009/10/08/gliding-balance-act/

    With the additional information, it doesn't seem so crazy.

    Oh, and in an interview with Bernard Farrell, he said he and his doctors don't know of a CGM that would work reliably enough for racing. (linky poo: http://www.bernardfarrell.com/blog/2010/02/kris-freeman-interview.htm)
     

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