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Insulin pump exciting but scary

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Momto3, Apr 25, 2011.

  1. Momto3

    Momto3 Approved members

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    After being derailed emotionally by our daughter's T1D dx 7 months ago, I'm starting to feel very fragile again as we look into insulin pumps. The idea of a pager-size device playing such a huge role in DD's life is scary. It's also exciting that she will be able to get a little freedom back.

    We are considering the Medtronic pump, but doubt comes into play if we are making the right choice. Our other option is the Animas Ping. From what I've read on the forums, it seems to be a matter of personal choice.

    I'd love any insights! Sorry to sound manic!!
     
  2. L101418

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    We start on on the Medtronic pump one week from today and my palms are sweaty just thinking about. I'm surprised by the intense rollarcoaster of emotions as we get closer so I know how you are feeling. It's like day one all over again. OK, not day one, but day 15. Head down and plow through.
    The best way is to trial each one. We didn't trial the Omnipod because I didn't like that I couldn't bolus from the pump. We all three tried the Animas and Medtronic and both girls chose the Medtronic pretty quickly because they liked the menus and button pushing better. Very scientific decision making.
     
  3. Tigerlilly's mom

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    The thought of "change" can be scary. I don't think that the differences between the Minimed and Animas pumps are big enough for you to make a "wrong choice" It definately comes down to personal choice.

    Remember there are lots of pumpers on this site that will be here to hold your hand. The minimed has a great tuturiol on their site that you may want to try out to help ease your mind a bit.

    Good luck!
     
  4. manda81

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    I remember that feeling of uncertainty in having to trust this device. It took me almost a month before I was really comfortable with it.

    If it's any consolation, pumping is the single best thing (for us) that has came from this disease. It has very much been a life changing decision, and I can't imagine how anyone would regret it. :)
     
  5. Tuff

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    Another thing to tell yourself is you can always go back to needles if you want after giving the pump a good try of say 3 months. That way you psyche yourself out knowing you can go back to what's familiar. (you probably won't want to though;))
     
  6. Momto3

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    Thank you both for your responses!

    I think you hit the nail on the head - change can be scary!

    Thanks again!!
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    For a girl her age, I could make a case for the ping, even though I really did not like the user interface and we are currently pumping with a minimed. But if she's not a dress kinda gal, then it may not be that valuable to have the remote bolus capability. ;) Good luck! (You really can't go wrong with either pump :cwds:)
     
  8. swimmom

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    You can request that the local reps for each company meet with you (they came to our house). They will bring a pump that you can look at and touch the buttons on. That gives you an idea of the differences in user interface, etc. I thought it was helpful to actually hold the pumps and try out the features (not hooked up to Lauren).

    We also did a saline trial, but I'm not sure I would recommend that with a small child and first pump. We tried that when Lauren was 7 and it put her off the whole idea for a while (we didn't have Emla cream for insertions, didn't know what we were doing and the saline stung).

    We love pumping. Good luck!
     
  9. hawkeyegirl

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    Don't stress about the pump choice. They are both good pumps, both do the same thing, and you will end up loving either one. :)

    We started pumping 5 months into diagnosis, and I was still very raw at that point. I don't think I slept a wink the night before we started. BUT, it was the best decision we could have made. It got us closer to having our "normal" life back than I would have ever dreamed possible. The look on his face when he had his first bite of food without a shot in 5 months - it was priceless.

    Hang in there. There are lots of people on this board who will help you through the "adjustment" period, but you'll be fine. :)
     
  10. txmom

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    WARNING - VENT

    I was going to start a new thread but I don't know how to. I am also very excited about starting to pump 16 months after dx. Thought I was being really proactive......here are the steps I've taken in preparation for "pump class" on June 16th.

    1) Had all 3 pump vendors out to the house for a demo
    2) Changed Grant's 05/03 appointment to coincide with pump training so we didn't need to delay getting doctors approval for an additional 3 months at the next appointment.
    3) Called BCBS and requested they pre-approve us
    4) Submitted required forms to BCBS (medical necessity etc).
    5) Tracked down a copy of the required week long "homework" so that it could be completed prior to pump training.
    6) Booked time off work to attend pump training.


    Boy did my little organized bubble get burst today!!!! Seems that the class on the 16th is only to choose the pump (we've already done this). There is another class called "pump mechanics" that is a day long class on how to actually use the pump (stupid me thought that would have been taught in "pump" class)......Can't get into a class to actually learn to use the pump until September...so much for getting over the hurdle in the summer before school started. After the September mechanics class there is another class the following Monday for "pump start". YIKES

    I'll have to beg for three days off - so much for starting in the summer. I started this process in February!!!! and it will be September before he actually has a pump.

    I want to call it quits tonight.

    I was also told that there will be 2 five day periods (one when we are doing the homework and one the first week we actually have insulin in the pump) that Grant can't do any physical stuff. No golf, no hockey......how am I going to schedule that in the middle of varsity season.

    Kind of takes some of the excitement away. Not sure I can get the time off or if we can skip two weeks of team commitments. Not doing anything about it tonight, maybe my humor will have returned by tomorrow.

    Sorry for the squawk.
     
  11. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Are all those rules coming from the endo? If so I'd call the pump rep and see if you can't get an at home training session and just move on with it. Good luck.
     
  12. txmom

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    Thanks - I'll call Medtronic and inquire about this option. I'm also less cranky now, I've eaten dinner.

    Sorry for the rant.
     
  13. bibrahim

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    I'll just add that it's probably a good thing I wasn't on here when we did our pump stuff or you would have all gotten a ton of rants. It isn't an easy task to get all this insurance stuff approved, especially with the roadblocks that get put up. I agree with Sarah, call the company and see what they can do to help. I think each Endo probably handles it differently.

    We didn't do a saline start. We had a private educator do our pump start and she helped with adjustments for the first 2 weeks then we did some follow up classes and are still learning from CWD. My daughter was just thrilled with dialing in her first insulin dose.

    For the OP, I am glad you are thinking of the emotional part of things. I get pretty emotional but for some reason both my husband and I got upset when doing the pump start. It was like "this is the best it will ever get" is how we felt and it was upsetting all over again that we even had to deal with diabetes for her. We got over it quickly, but I just wasn't prepared for it. That said, we are SO HAPPY we have the pump and don't regret our decision about getting one at all. Good luck with the process.
     
  14. StillMamamia

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    Hope all goes well. It can be scary, kind of like jumping into a pool without knowing how to swim. But no worries, we'll be your floaties.:)

    (ETA - that rhymes, LOL)
     
  15. kavon

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    Ping

    My son has been on the Ping for a year. The pumpl allows much more flexablity with food but we still chase highs and lows. At the training they give you the basics on how to use the pump. Then they tell you that at some point you should take an advanced pumping class. This class should be taken with in 2 months of getting the pump. Since you are no longer confined to a regiment of carbs you need to learn how sugar and fat effects the way you digest and how to do extended boluses. The pump will never get it right if you don't account for fat in the diet and extend the way insulin is sent in. Don't wait get the advance class as soon as possible. P.S. my son and I are both happy with his pump.
     
  16. DsMom

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    We've only ever used the Ping, so I can't compare, but we've been very happy with it. For us, the pump really provided a lot more freedom and control. There is an adjustment period, so don't get discouraged. Daniel's numbers were very high occasionally for the first few months while we got his basal and I:C rates adjusted--especially overnight. However, after that initial period, his A1c has dropped consistently each time we see the endo. We are now 1 1/2 points lower than we were on MDI.

    I have nothing but positive feelings about pumping. I did feel a little nervous at first relying on it--but both of my nieces pump, so I felt safe relying on their experience. I really don't know how I would have managed Daniel's stomach bugs on MDI. Granted, I was far from proficient after only a year on MDI--and I know lots of people handle any situation that comes at them with MDI. I just found it easier to let the pump do the calculations--and I love that I can turn it off if we need to.

    I worried that my son would not like having something attached to him--but he never once complained. He was actually extremely proud of his pump and showed it off to everyone. I was also afraid he'd be uncomfortable sleeping with it. But, we just put it under his pillow and, again, he's never complained at all.

    I wish you the best of luck!! It was absolutely the best decision we ever made.
     
  17. aidensmom

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    My son started pumping with the Animas Ping in September and I know exactly how you feel. It was very scary, but I'm so glad that we made the change. I can't imagine going back to injections now. The flexibility it has given us is wonderful. I also love the remote feature with the Ping. It's definitely scary and stressful as you are learning everything, but so worth it!
     
  18. cm4kelly

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    Minimed Revel for Us

    My son is 4 and started with MiniMed Revel 7/10. My husband is also type 1 and has the same pump. While I was intrigued by the remote on the Animas, we decided to use the Revel for a few reasons. You can add later the CGM feature - and see graphs and continuous numbers on the pump itself ( I would wait at least 6 months to do this); buttons were easier to use - bolusing; of course Dad and son being on the same pump helps when I have questions.

    I really like the mio inserter - it lies flat and is easy to carry around and disposable. You will be a pro in no time. Just be patient as you try to make adjustments. It might get worse before it gets better, but it is so worth it!
    You'll never want to go back to shots!

    Kelly
    Mom to Parker (4) d/x 11/09 pumping Minimed Revel since 7/10
    Mom to Marley (8) non-d
    Wife to Dan (41) d/x 1978 pumping Minimed Revel
     
  19. Cassidi's mom

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    Okay- so who is telling you to do all of these classes? I am nervous for the opposite reason! We received our ping for our daughter in the mail Friday- they said someone would contact us to set up training within 10 days. Will we still have to go through all that too, or do we do individual trainings? like you, my husband and I both work and are wondering- hello- are they just going to call us and say when we come or will we have a heads up? Sort of wondering why they have to have 10 days to contact us too- sort of annoying. We also want to be up and running over the summer for planning and better supervision.
     
  20. timkris724

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    It is so weird how different things are at different endo's. For us we got the Ping. We got a Rx for it from the endo 3 months into diagnosis. It arrived in the mail in a few days. We set up an appointment, went in for about an hour, ploped the thing on him and headed home. We talked with Animas daily by phone for 2 weeks but that is it. We had no restrictions, but of course how much does a 17 month old really do.

    There was an adjustment period and learning curve. I think at diagnosis you are numb when you learn everything so you are just confused and in a daze figuring it out. By the time you get to adjusting to learning the pump you get a little more frustrated but only for a couple of weeks.

    I would not go back to shots for a million bucks.For me it would be like going back to the VCR from the DVR!;)
     

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