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Implantable artificial pancreas (Israel)

Discussion in 'Research' started by Ellen, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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  2. Ali

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    Thanks for posting Ellen.
    This appears to me to be one of the best ideas yet. I hope it works as expected. I would use it in a heartbeat. Ali
     
  3. emm142

    emm142 Approved members

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    This actually looks like really quite a good idea. Now I want one. :p
     
  4. Enddiabetes

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    Thanks for the post Ellen. This does look like a good idea. It will be interesting to see how the study goes. If it goes well, it looks like they are shooting for marketing approval in the US in 2016 which seems like a long ways away, but hay, at least there is optimism. Keeping the autoimmune cells out of the devices does appear to be the challenge. I sure hope they can do it.
     
  5. carbz

    carbz Banned

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    I don't have the patience to read this but from a quick glance it looks similar to what prof Tejal Desai is working on. Either way far more appealing then the external crap the JDRF is investing in.
     
  6. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    I love that Dr. Vardi said they intend to use pig islets. But what happens if you forget to give yourself the necessary oxygen - the islets die - "In your presentation you mentioned the daily oxygen injection required by the device to keep the islet cells alive. What does the injection involve? Would it restrict the life of the patient?
    The patient will need a refueling process every 24 hours, which should take 2-3 minutes (net refueling time is 40 seconds). In this process, the patient injects oxygen into the device through an implantable port using the table top injection unit that we developed."

    It also sounds very similar to what the Diabetes Research Institute is trying to achieve in Cherie Stabler's lab http://www.diabetesresearch.org/page.aspx?pid=233 (BTW, CWDFoundation.org is supporting the work at the DRI).
     
  7. DadCares

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    This is very creative thinking. Thanks for sharing. These guys have a clever strategy to bypass the autoimmune attack.

    If this succeeds, we will still need to research other ways to stop the autoimmune attack(s) since type 1 diabetics have a common genetic profile to other autoimmune attacks such as celiac disease etc.

    Thanks for sharing Ellen, and please keep us posted as you hear news from the German trial later this year.
     
  8. Luke's Mom

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    I second Emma --- we want one too!!!!
     
  9. sparty87

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    Is it a "cure", in my mind, not even close. BUT.... it's a lot better than an artificial pancreas consisting of a pump, CGMS, and a microprocessor.

    I wonder how ANY artificial pancreas can ever work well? They measures blood glucose using time lagged and imprecise technologies, and attempt to implement control via subcutaneous insulin infusion, with its long delay in action?. Would this not lead to dangerous oscillation in blood glucose level with aggressive control, and lots of out of range blood glucose levels with conservative control? Seems to violate what I recall of control theory.
     
  10. Ali

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    The problem with a "cure" for T1 is that we do not really know what all has to be fixed. If we can do the insulin replacement route, either with stem cells or this type of cell replacement, we will go a long way in knowing if anything else besides the insulin needs fixing. But the "insulin cell replacement" approach is so much better than having two or more external devices attached to you, and having to oversee what is going on and using a man made insulin that I can not even compare the two approaches. One is in real time (the stem/pig cell) approach, while the artificial pancreas approach is miles away from this. But both may be missing some other key issues of being a T1 which are seperate from the insulin issue. :cwds::cwds:Just My opionon.:cwds:Ali
     

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