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If Ivan dreams of food when sleeping will he go high?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Ivan's Mum, Oct 23, 2011.

  1. Ivan's Mum

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    I feel stoopid asking this, but my son is a MAJOR foodie, loves it. Doesn't sneak food, boluses. There's no off limit food here.

    Problem: at night he dreams about cooking/eating... I can go in to test him when he's asleep and he's talking about food and, by the looks of it, eating it.

    And for no logical reason, he's higher (not super high likes he's eaten real food, just higher).

    This isn't every night but seems to be the nights I find him 'night eating'.

    If I can go walking in my sleep, never leave the bed and pull my leg muscles (great amusement to my husband because my legs do move when I'm doing it but not the huge steps I'm taking in my dream), could a food dream affect Van's BG.

    Okay, you can laugh at me now but it's got me thinking.
     
  2. kpoehls

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    Funny that you should post this, because we have wondered often if Mara has been eating in her dreams when we test her bs when she has been sleeping for hours...
     
  3. Ivan's Mum

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    18 reads and not one comment! I'm not kidding. I am REALLY wondering this, I am getting my knickers in a bit of a twist about it. I'd like to think I'm reasonally on the ball when it comes to D (it's been 5 years after all) and yes, reading over what I've written makes me sound, well, a little bit crazy.

    But I know my son well enough and it doesn't shape up like a growth spurt so I'm asking the question. I've considered G.I of food, exercise, fat, etc. There is no other logical reason.

    Oh, logic, I didn't think about that one, D is seldom logic.:(
     
  4. Ivan's Mum

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    hoorah, I am not alone.:D
     
  5. StillMamamia

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    I'm tempted to think it's the dream process itself which may be causing a slighter BG rise (raise:confused:) - you know, like if you dream that George Clooney is ringing your bell and inviting you out to dinner and you get all happy and stuff in your dream....I, of course, am assuming such a dream would cause such a "bodily" reaction.

    :D
     
  6. kiwikid

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    Our D Educator says she dreams of food if she is low. Could his dreams be because he is feeling low and the higher BG is a rebound from that?
     
  7. nanhsot

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    From a literal perspective I'd say that no, the dream itself cannot cause bg to rise. However, ANY dream (food or no) has the potential to raise adrenalin which can alter bg.

    Truth is that dreams happen throughout the night at differing times depending on sleep cycles, so there's no way to truly know that a certain dream is even of food and another is not. All you have to go on is what you hear him say, but ALL his dreams could be of food for all we know!
     
  8. nanhsot

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    Well, but the George dream has the ability to alter brain waves, which in turn CAN cause bodily reactions, if you know what I mean. ;) Our brains control much of our (particularly women) responses in that department but our brains can't alter blood sugar.

    I do think a dream could alter hormonal levels though, cause adrenalin and such to rise, but it seems to me that a dream about being a superhero could do it as well as one about food, maybe.

    I'm finding this a strangely compelling topic!

    No one in my family remembers dreams very often, it's quite disappointing.
     
  9. Jacob'sDad

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    Well, I've had that George Clooney dream all all that happened was that I woke up very confused.:confused: Why the hell was George Clooney at my front door asking me out for dinner? Not the strangest dream I've had, but it ranks right up there.
     
  10. bryantfam

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    I find this quite interesting as well. A previous poster mentioned dreaming of food while low which is also interesting based on my experience.

    Just this morning (well, almost afternoon as we are apparently nocturnal) Herbie (7, dx'd Dec 2010) started talking in his sleep saying "Mom, it's just because he's low, that's all." Sure enough a test revealed him at 59. Not my idea of a good sleeping number! He doesn't remember his dream or the person about which he was speaking, but I'm glad I was around to hear it!
     
  11. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    When I dream about eating, I'm usually low.

    I wonder if dreaming about food is caused by the release of the hormones that are also causing rise in blood sugar. Or if maybe the same glucagon spike that happens with real eating could be happening with dream eating.
     
  12. Amy C.

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    The blood sugar does not stay very steady at night -- anyone with a CGMS will tell you this. It usually goes down over a long period and perhaps back up over a long period.

    Blood tests are just a snapshot.
     
  13. wilf

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    Enhanced brain activity requires more glucose, not less.
     
  14. Kayeecee

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    Spencer's blood sugar can go low when she's sitting and watching TV when she's anxious about the programming. For instance, this summer when the US played that big soccer match (can't remember against whom), we had to treat her twice for lows because she was so "nervous" for the team. She plays soccer herself & often goes low before games due to apprehension. On the other hand, in the heat of battle, she'll run an adrenaline high.

    With all these emotional reactions causing very real changes in blood sugar, I'm convinced that her dream life causes unexplained highs and lows overnight. She's a very active dreamer.
     
  15. momandwifeoftype1s

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    When Brian (DH) starts talking in his sleep, I know he's low. I kick him and tell him to go test his blood sugar. I'm so sweet, right? :p
     
  16. Ivan's Mum

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    Three level wedding cake with chocolate bride and groom last night. 16 when I checked and corrected, back to normal by the morning. I asked how often he dreams of food and the answer was 'all the time'.

    Wish he'd move on to dreaming about girls. That might solve the problem:p
     
  17. Heather(CA)

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    Hmmm well since the smell and thought of food can actually start the pancreas working in a non D person. I would think that dreaming about food if it affected anything would cause lows. (Not that I think that either) It's most likely adrenaline, or hormones, or the lack of activity at night :)
     
  18. Darryl

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    The answer is definitely yes, one third of the time. A third of the time it will go low, and a third of the time it will stay the same ;)
     
  19. akgiauque

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    Reading the first post made me laugh, then I was confused thinking of George Clooney. Now I wonder, does the pancrease react like the rest of the autonomic nervous system to dreaming. I see no reason why it would not.
     

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