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IEP meeting went horrible

Discussion in 'School and Daycare' started by ashley_lynden, Nov 5, 2009.

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  1. ashley_lynden

    ashley_lynden Approved members

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    My son was diagnosed T1D October 16th. He hasn't been to school since. He going to preschool and has an IEP alreasy in place. Yesterday was his meeting to add on the diabetes. It didn't go well. Apparantly, we share our school nurse (his preschool class is in the elementary school) with several other schools in the area. At the same time my son needs his shot, she is across town giving one to another child. So now, they want to move him to the morning class. That isn't going to work for numerous reasons. So they are going to have to talk to the superintendent to find out what to do next. I have no idea when my son will be able to go back to school. In the meantime, he hasn't gotten his therapy is 4 weeks (it was fall break when he was diagnoses) and I have no idea when he will be going back to school. Can someone help me? I've e-mailed an advocate from our states education rights website, but I do not know when I will hear from here. any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. CrystalK

    CrystalK Approved members

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    Hi Ashley-Lynn -

    I'm so sorry to hear about the problems you're having with your son's school. :( But I suggest posting this issue on the Parents of Children With Type 1 board/forum - you will get a lot of fantastic advice there. Basically, if your son is going to a public school, what they are trying to do is illegal and you have tools at your disposal to "fight" back. But you will get a lot more information on that board!!

    Good luck!!
     
  3. Brideyful

    Brideyful Approved members

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    If it is in the IEP that they are supposed to be providing therapy for your child...they have to do that leally speaking...even if you have to bring your child to the school daily. What the school is doing is illegal on sooooooo many levels.
     
  4. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    If he is in a public preschool, he is entitled to a Section 504 plan that is separate from an IEP -- they are required by law to administer insulin, and they cannot change his schedule in order to meet their needs. They also cannot favor one diabetic over another!

    Do a search on 504 plans both on the forums and on the home CWD page, you will find a lot of info about them.
     
  5. Pawsibilities Unleashed

    Pawsibilities Unleashed Approved members

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    Information for you

    When at war with a school system, have your weapons in a row:) First you need to have a Diabetes Medical Management Plan (DMMP) for your child. This comes from your child's health care team and spells out the medical care your child whould receive at school. You can download a sample DMMP at www.diabetes.org or call 1-800-DIABETES. There are 3 levels of training appropriate for school personnel: (1) person who will actually perform diabetes care task, (2) Training for other school staff members who have pirmary responsibility for a student with diabetes (3) Training for the whole schol personnel to should include an overview of the diabetes, what it is, why it is, how to cope with it, etc. Now, your child's rights are the school's responsibility. Almost ll schols are required by law to provide aids and whatever sevices that meet the childs medical needs.Three Federal laws play a very important part in school role. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (2) The ADA (3)IDEA - Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Yor have the legal right to request that your child be evaluated for services, and if they are eligible:
    Schedule a meeting with school officials. You have a right to an advocate, lawyer or expers to this meeting to better explain your child's diabetes management.
    Develop a plan to accommodate the unique needs of your child. the plan should precisely set out the types of special services your child needs to receive
    do not sign any plan if it does not meet your child's needs. Be reasonable, but stand firm. Give no quarter where your childs needs are not being met.
    be notified and review any proposed changes in your childs plan, be included in conferences or meetings held to review the plan, review and consider any changes before they are implemented.

    You can contact your civil rights coordinator for your area. Also your ADA coordinator.

    Safe at School Campaign launched by ADa to ensure students with diabetes are safe at school - www.diabetes.org/safeatschool

    Excellent pamphlet from ADA is Children with Diabetes: information for schools and child care providers. www.diabetes.org You can also discuss a specific school or day care issue with the ADA legal advocate. address for the head of the ADA is: eeames@csufresno.edu and Toni Eames is the ADA person.

    Also, www.ndep.nih.gov/resources/school.htm has guide for school personnel

    www.diabetes.org/schooltraining for Diabetes Care tasks School training module

    Hope this helps and if you need more information contact our Advocate for Disabilites, Tracey Hagan for info. She is our professional advocate and we are Pawsibilities Unleashed www.pawsibilitiesunleashed.org

    info@pawsibilitiesunleashed.org for Tracey or Liz


    Also, you can file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education, through the school district or state appeal porcess. Do not delay in getting legal help. If actions is not started immediately (administrative appeal) then you lose the ability to pursue them.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2009
  6. Jessicas mom

    Jessicas mom Approved members

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    Keep this in mind when dealing with the school

    Make sure your 504 clearly states what will occur when there is a substitute teacher there. How will the message be relayed that you have a child with diabetes that must have accesses to accomodate this condition?

    My daughter was diagnosed at the age of 8 is 2006. I had a horrible time getting her back in to school. The district we had her in at the time was a shared resource. I went back to the school to put her back in three weeks before school let out for the summer. The nurse told me that she thought it was a better idea if I got the curriculum and homeschooled her since I was on a FMLA anyways. I went out to the car and called the doctor who told me to go back in and tell them she would be back to school the following day. I took her there as the doctor told me to but the nurse made it extremly difficult. She had put in the IEP that if the nurse was at another school or unavailable that I was to be called to administer insulin. Luckily I read the IEP prior to signing it and saw it. I am a working mother with a fairly high power job. Of course my children come first but there are times it is very difficult for me to get away let alone be expected to be the back-up for the nurse. We battled this, I had a 504 put in place and things began to go smoothly, sort of. The school nurse would call the hospital second guessing what I instructed as well as what the doctor ordered behind my back so many times that I had to rescind her permissions to contact the endo directly.

    About a year after her diagnosis she had a substitute teacher. The sub was unaware of her condition. She felt low during class and requested permission to go to the nurse. The sub told her to sit down and wait until recess. Jessica is fairly passive and did as instructed. About an hour later she began to cry as she always does when she is low. Luckily there was another diabetic child in the classroom who took matters in to her own hands and took Jessica to the nurse. When they arrived the nurse wasn't there (nobody told me). The librarian untrained in diabetes was sitting in for her. Jessica was handed her meter and tested to find she was indeed low at 42. She found the librarian who was doing a head lice check on other kids and told her she was low only to be instructed to sit on a bench until the librarian was done with the lice check. Jessica requested an office worker to call me but was told to sit on the bench and wait. She was finally treated. I have no idea how low she was at this point. After school Jessica told me what happened and I attempted to contact the school only have none of my calls answered or returned. The following day we were doing a diabetic walk with the school board of directors. I drove to his office and told him what was going on at the school. By the time we did the walk he had rolled some heads at the school. I am sure he was petrified I was going to file a law suit. I guess they are lucky that I am not sue happy!

    Luckily we have moved to a state with a nurse on staff full time. I have had a perfect experience at this school. The school is extremely supportive of what I expect from them and communicate with me about even small things that concern them. Jessica was put on an insulin pump last week and all is going very well.

    I have learned that if you are a quiet parent that it will no longer work. You must be an advocate for your child in order for the child to get the things that non-diabetic children take for granted! Sorry for rambling on but I thought it was all important to write!
     
  7. Flutterby

    Flutterby Approved members

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    They CAN NOT make him switch classes.. They will have to figure something out, plan and simple. Second, if he already has an IEP, they can add the 504 stuff right into it, he won't need a seperate 504.. Do NOT let the school bully you.. your son has the right to stay in the class he's in.
     
  8. ashley_lynden

    ashley_lynden Approved members

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    I'm finding this pretty late in the year, but how can they not make us change? They said there was no other nurse available.

    He's been going to the morning class since he stated back. He still doesn't like school. We've also had matters where even when everything is laid out in black and white in front of them, things still don't always go as they should. Quite honestly, I sometimes wonder if hsi nurse knows anything about diabetes even though she has another diabetic at another school she's taken care of for at least a couple of years.

    I'm actually looking into private school next year. I'm tired of what we've went through this year. Not only is he T1D, but he also has a fairly signifigant speech delay (that he is making no progress with) and now the doctors are looking at him possibly being on the autism spectrum. I'm not happy with his school in more ways that one.
     
  9. Flutterby

    Flutterby Approved members

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    They simply have to accomidate him.. they can't make him switch for the nurses schedule.. they have to figure out the nursing situation and accomidate him..

    I'd be really careful with private schools, they don't have to follow the 504s like public schools do.. some will do what they have to do anyway, but their are others that won't do anything they don't 'have' to do.. if they accept ANY federal money, they have to follow the ADA and do a 504.. if you have an IEP, you don't need a 504, they can put all that info into the IEP..
     

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