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Idiots Guide to Pumping?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by HelenaHandBasket, Jun 26, 2011.

  1. HelenaHandBasket

    HelenaHandBasket Approved members

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    Is there one or can someone summarize it in 500 words or less. :D

    I'm embarrassed to say I don't know the first thing about them. :(
     
  2. obtainedmist

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  3. Lovemyboys

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    Pumping Insulin is a good book about insulin pumps.

    Here's the very basics:
    The insulin pump delivers short acting insulin (Novolog, Humolog, Apidra) in two different ways.
    1) bolus - to cover carbs eaten and to give corrections
    2) basal - this would replace Lantus or Levemir,

    After programming in your child's I:C ratio, duration of insulin action, insulin sensitivity factor, you would put in your child's number of carbs and it will give a recommended amount of insulin to be bolused. Or you can enter a high bg and it will give you a recommended amount of insulin (and calculate how much he already has in his system - IOB, insulin on board) to bring the bg down into the range that you have selected.

    The basal usually runs 24/7 with the pump delivering a little amount of insulin every few minutes.

    One of the hardest things about pumping is getting the basal and carb ratios right. For us, we get them set right and then he goes through a growth spurt and we have to change them again.

    Someone else will probably be able to explain it better, but I'd thought I'd try. Hope that helps.
     
  4. cm4kelly

    cm4kelly Approved members

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    Pumping 101

    I'll give this a try. I am not a pro in the world of insulin pumps, but my husband has had one for five years and my four-year old has had his pump for a year. In a nutshell -

    An insulin pump holds 2/3 days supply of insulin. You hook it to your body through what is called a "site" you place on your body (stomach, thighs, arms, lower back) that is a plastic canula. This "site" you also change and move it every 2/3 days. The pump has a small plastic tubing through which insulin flows into the site. You wear your pump (the size of a small cell phone or pager) all day in a pouch or in your pocket. It is removed for showering or swimming.

    To use your pump, you check your blood glucose on a meter, and enter that number into the pump. Then enter the number of carbs you are eating. The pump is programmed by you to know how much insulin you need for corrections (when your blood glucose is too high) and for food. The pump will suggest the amount of insulin you need based on what you have entered and you simply agree to it The pump dispenses insulin through the tubing into your site. This is called a BOLUS.

    A pump also has what are called BASALS. I describe this as an hourly drip of insulin that helps to keep your blood glucose stable. It uses regular novalog or humalog insulin ( the basal drip eliminates the need for long acting insulin like Lantus). The basal feature is what works more like a normal pancreas and like Lantus, if you are familiar with that term.

    Pumps for us have let us live a more normal life.
    Hope this helps some. I am sure you have more questions, so fire away.
     
  5. swimmom

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    Benefits of a pump from a child's perspective - it gives Lauren the ability to eat pretty much what and when she chooses. Snacks, parties, etc. - not a problem. It also allows us to quickly and easily correct high BGs. We can set several basal rates to manage her BG throughout the day and night. We can set temporary basal rates to help manage sports, illness and even sedentary things like long car rides. It allows her to live a more normal life.
     
  6. HelenaHandBasket

    HelenaHandBasket Approved members

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    Thank you! Will research for future reference! :D
     
  7. fredntan2

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    my fav pumping book is Think Like a Pancreas by Gary Scheiner. He writes in a way that I wouldn't fall asleep when reading. cause the only time I had back then to read that kind of stuff was at night. and the other book Pumping insulin was just too much info for me at time. could only read a couple of pages before I would fall asleep.
     
  8. DsMom

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    500 words or less???

    BEST THING WE'VE EVER DONE! (Everyone else has provide you the real details very well!:p;))
     
  9. JeremysDad

    JeremysDad Approved members

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    Jeremy cannot imagine going back to MDI after pumping. It's easy and discrete and gives him the freedom to eat and bolus multiple times whenever he wants.

    We have had our fair share of pod failures but when it works, it works.
     
  10. jules12

    jules12 Approved members

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    There is a pink panther book about insulin pumps and cgms. I think it is very easy to understand and have given it to my mom to look through. I think pumping with insulin is good but I wouldn't call it easy reading.

    Go to the pump company websites and request brochures on each pump and look through them. Ask your endo too if they have any info they provide on pumps.


    The link posted earlier is for the pink panther book on diabetes in general. This link is for the pink panther book just on pumping.
    http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/c...ineBooks/Pages/UnderstandingInsulinPumps.aspx
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2011
  11. HelenaHandBasket

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    Thank you again!
     
  12. fredntan2

    fredntan2 Approved members

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    imagine a pca-now squeeze it way down and clip it on your belt. If you can program a pca you can do a pump.

    pca is patient controlled analgesia-for those that don't speak nurse
     
  13. kimmcannally

    kimmcannally Approved members

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    In the words of my DS, J. "I don't want a pancreas! I like my pump!" :D
     
  14. DsMom

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    My son loves his pump too and once said he would not want to give it up if there was a cure!:)
     
  15. Tracy1918

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    Someone else may have written this and I missed it....

    But another thing we love about the pump is the ability to give very small doses of insulin.

    On MDI, the smallest we could give was half a unit.

    Now, we can give .05 units---and believe it or not, that little bit makes a big difference. It allows us to "sneak up" on highs. Especially overnight.
     

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