- advertisement -

I Have Questions About Type 2

Discussion in 'Adults with Type 2' started by Jensmom, Jun 13, 2006.

  1. Jensmom

    Jensmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Messages:
    38
    I have a friend that was recently diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. I sometimes think it's harder on an adult to be diagnosed, because it's difficult to change your diet and lifestyle after years of bad eating habits, etc.

    I know that my questions may seem silly but I don't know. My daughter is type 1, but I also know that there are some differences.

    Are lows treated the same with a type 2 as type 1? Also, does Glucagon work the same on type 2 as type 1? Our friend was diagnosed about a month ago, but his doctor put him on Advantia. He is not required to check keytones, which I was surprised at. Also, he wasn't prescribed a Glucagon kit. Is that normal? Do you not have the same possiblility of going low as on insulin?

    I am trying to help their family to adjust to the new way of thinking, but I do not want to give them the incorrect information. I have given some reading materials to his wife, and she is going through it. I feel sorry for her, because she feels responsible for his care as she is a homemaker. If anyone can give me any good tips to pass along to them or even websites that are helpful, I would appreciate it.

    Thanks,
    Colleen
     
  2. CAGrandma

    CAGrandma Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Messages:
    530
    I was diagnosed with Type 2 a few years ago and my 2 year old grandson was diagnosed Type 1 last year. His family was living with us, so I got a lot of info on type 1!

    In my opinion they are 2 entirely different diseases, with some similarities. In Type 2 the pancreas is usually still producing ample amounts of insulin but the body becomes less and less able to use it effectively. Diet and exercise are important and can make a significant difference - even making medication of any kind unnecessary, at least for awhile. Some type 2's do require medication and/or insulin. Medication very rarely results in the kind of dangerous lows type 1's worry about and I don't know any who have been given glucagon kits.

    The lifestyle changes recommended for type 2 are the kind EVERYONE should be following - good, well-balanced diet, exercise, limiting junk food. Since type 2 is so 'popular' there is tons of info available - in fact, there are people who advise type 1's that they could eliminate the need for insulin if they just ate right (they confuse the 2 diseases).

    I did feel pretty sorry for myself when I was diagnosed. Hated the idea of taking medication. Hated the idea of having to change my (unhealthy) lifestyle. Then my grandson was diagnosed and I realized that I was an idiot.
     
  3. Flutterby

    Flutterby Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2006
    Messages:
    14,623
    My Dad is Type 2 and my daughter is type 1.. There are HUGE differences between them.. my dad does not test.. I believe he should.. but his Dr does not require it because he's A1cs are excellent.. he takes a pill (not metformin.. the other one) and is well controlled (although I wished he'd check his BS at least once a day).. he watches his sugar intake, and knows when he's had to muhc.. he'll back off.. like if we have a b-day party.. he'll have a small piece of cake.. and thats it.. no other sweets.. my dad is a very queezy person.. the sight of blood and he freaks out... even after almost a year my dad (I think he's thick headed LOL) doesn't get everything about Kaylee.. that she needs to be check before she can have anything.. he gets that they are two different deseases but he's also her PaPa and papa's are suppose to be able to say yes to everything a child wants.. Type 2 runs in my dad's side of the family..almost everyone has it.. but like the previous poster said, type 1 and type 2 aren't related in any way except that they are diabetes.. I have people say to me all the time.. but she'll grow out of it.. and trying to explain to them, no she won't grow out of type 1.. I get looks like I don't know what I"m talking about.. just because 'juvenile' is in the title, does not mean its dissappears.. Type 2 is usually (but not always) under good control w/ diet.. but diet doesn't always fix it.. there are still people out there that no matter what they do.. how wonderfuly nutritous their diet is they're still going to have type 2... while type 2 is mainly diet.. type 1 is an autoimmun (sp??;) disease.. there is absolutely NOTHING you can do to stop it, or get rid of it.. once your pancreatic cells are gone, they're gone.. and until there is a cure you'll be taking insulin multiple times a day for the rest of your life..

    While its hard for an adult to change their lifestyle to a healther one to keep their diabetes under good control.. telling a 3 year old how long forever is when explaining that yes, every day, multiple times a day she'll have to take shots. Or how long she'll have to have something infused in her and carry around a pump 24/7.. forever for a 3 year old isn't even a concept to them.. impossible for them to understand...
     
  4. TheFormerLantusFiend

    TheFormerLantusFiend Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Messages:
    4,925
    Type 2 diabetics almost never go into DKA, so even though they can get ketones it isn't as big of a deal. My doctor thought I had type 2 until she saw that I was in DKA.
    Glucagon is just as useful for Type 2s as Type 1s if the type 2 person is taking medicine or insulin.
     
  5. Momof4gr8kids

    Momof4gr8kids Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2006
    Messages:
    4,143
    I have a friend who is type 2 as well. She is on oral meds, and the lowest she generally goes is in the 80's.

    If the med that a person takes boosts the amount of insulin they make they can go low if the dose is to high, but that is easily changed, and usually doesn't result in a low like you could see as a type 1. If he is on meds that make his body absorb the insulin that he makes naturally, he doesn't need to worry about lows.

    Because people with type 2 make their own insulin pretty well ketones aren't an issue like they are with type 1. They can still have ketones, just like a normal person can, but typically are not at risk of DKA, and usually their highs are not quite as bad as a type 1 without insulin.

    Like stated above type 1, and 2 are 2 different worlds. Most of the info out there is based on type 2. A good place to start is the ADA website.
     
  6. deafmack

    deafmack Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    Messages:
    3,209
    For people with type 2 diabetes, yes a person with type 2 can have a severe low just like a person with type 1 diabetes depending on the type of medications they are using or by taking medication and not eating. Also people with type 2 can have severe lows and need a glycagon kit if they use insulin. An example of a drug that a person can have a low with besides insulin is if the person is taking a sulfronyea such as glipizide. It is important for type 2 to count carbs just like type 1 and to check their blood sugars.
    I am type 2 and I have friends who are type 2 and friends who are type 1.
    It is true that many people do not check their blood sugars either because they are scared or they have not been trained the proper way to do so.
    I hope this helps clarify the information about type 1 and 2. I know many people think people with type 2 do not have lows but that is not true. We can have lows like other people with diabetes do regardless of the type of diabetes.
     
  7. beckybuckley

    beckybuckley Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2006
    Messages:
    254
    I'm searching through these threads because I have similar questions. My daughter is type 1 and we have a dear friend who is type 2. He came over the other night and I insisted he test his blood sugar before helping himself to a bowl of candy. He was 270. He doesn't check unless I guilt him into it and I was worried about him getting DKA. So if type 2's don't typically throw ketones, what are the other dangers of being/staying that high? I asked another type 2 and he had never heard of ketones or DKA.
     
  8. lilituc

    lilituc Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Messages:
    368
    The dangers are long-term complications. So for most Type 2s, it's not a matter of becoming acutely ill with DKA. It depends on the person, though. Some go years without complications. Others can even have them at diagnosis (after being undiagnosed for several years).
     
  9. TheFormerLantusFiend

    TheFormerLantusFiend Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Messages:
    4,925
    My grandfather was diagnosed with type 2 only after he had a heart attack partly caused by diabetes- having high blood sugars will cause complications in most people. That said, I have a type 2 friend I guilted into testing once, she tested at 230, but her A1c is the same as mine- 6.5. I guess sometimes her blood sugar is better than othertimes, just like me.
     
  10. tyler883

    tyler883 Guest

    There are some similarities, and some differences...

    Yes, lows are treated the same as someone with type 1. However, many type 2 are only being treated for insulin desensitivity so they may not be taking a drug that influences insulin production.

    In my case, I take 3x500mg of metformin, a drug that improves my insulin desensitivity, but does not directly influence my insulin production. Therefore, low blood sugar levels are certainly possible, but they are rare. Other people with type 2 might not fit the same description as me, ie low blood sugar events might be common and they may be taking insulin to manage their blood sugar levels.

    As a type 2, if I eat better and exercise, I may be able to manage my diabetes with less meds.....or hopefully without taking any meds. As far as I know, if I experience low blood sugars, it may be the first signs that I need less medication.

    Best wishes to all

    Tyler
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 10, 2007
  11. deafmack

    deafmack Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    Messages:
    3,209
    Type 2 can have ketones if their blood sugars are above 250 but they do not get DKA. Type 2 get something that is far worse. I think the name is
    Nonketonic Hypersomolar Syndrome which is almost always fatal. Obviously your friend has not had proper diabetes training and I would urge him to take a class. He might be surprised. At 270 his diabetes is obviously not in control and he needs help. I am glad you guilted him into a blood sugar check. Diabetes is nothing to fool around with and it does not matter which type. Your friend is headed for a lifetime of complications just as if he had type 1. He needs to learn to take care of himself properly. The training for type 2 diabetes is the same as for type 1 except if he is not on insulin then he would not have to take the section on insulin. You are right to be concerned and he is blessed to have a friend that cares.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2007
  12. deafmack

    deafmack Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    Messages:
    3,209
    Just wanted to add that yes type 2 's can have lows that are severe and can end in death if they are on insulin or certain drugs like sulfronyeas. Also people with type 2 can have ketones but they do not go into DKA. But Type 2 can get what is HHS or HHNS which is Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Syndrome or also known as Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketonic Syndrome. It is extremely high blood sugars without ketones and it is fatal 95% or the time. I came too close for comfort last summer and you can believe I never want to get anywhere near that again. That was one scary event. Both types of diabetes have their own awfulness and I do not wish either on anyone.
     
  13. mom to a sports nut

    mom to a sports nut Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2007
    Messages:
    298
    I love what you had to say!!! My mom is type 2. Hers is due to years of neglect of diet, exercise and weight control. My daughter is 12, and was diagnosed 2 years ago with type 1. She is a Provincially ranked competitive swimmer, plays rep basketball and is on the go continually and doesn't have enough fat on her to find enough injection spots. My mom seems to think they have 'the same thing'. It is nice to know that I am not off my rocker in thinking she is not correct!!
     
  14. jstump7697

    jstump7697 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    7
    I am Jeremy and i am 35 and have type 2 diabetes. I have been on since 2001 when my sugars were out of control and my blood sugar was at 400. Since then i have went through several different pills and regimans, and finally with Lanus Insulin and Avandia my blood sugars are in between 100 and 145 or so. After getting it under control i started to notice my feet were burning and felt like someone was sticking me with needles. I found out through nerve and muscle tests i have Peripheral Neuropathy now too. So now i am on Gabapentin. All of these medicines have side effects of weight gain which is bad so it is extra hard for me to try and excersize, eat better, etc...
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice