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I have a teenage boy newly diagnosed at 15.

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Myboyharry1, Sep 9, 2012.

  1. Myboyharry1

    Myboyharry1 New Member

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    Hi there, my son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes on the 28th of August this year after being rushed into hospital at the point of collapse. The nurses and doctors were wonderful and after a few hours he picked up. My son and I are now trying to newly manage his sugar and insulin levels. He gets very frustrated and often ends up in tears with this process. Can anyone tell me if the initial whirl calms down? I must admit, I'm finding things quite rough too but we're coping together. Thank you, Clare Patterson - and Harry.
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

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    Welcome - and we're sorry you need to be here. My daughter was diagnosed two years ago, and it does get easier. Or less hard. The first three months were the absolute hardest. Six month mark was hard, at one year I cried for three weeks, and this year...there are times we're starting to operate on auto-pilot. The emotions still flare up at times, but most days are just spent going about life with diabetes thrown in for an extra challenge.
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

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    Hi, and welcome. I'll see if we can got some moms with older kids (older at dx) to chime in.

    It gets easier, but it does take time.

    Any specific problems that we might be able to help with?
     
  4. emm142

    emm142 Approved members

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    Hi there. I was diagnosed at 14 - I'm 19 now, at university and doing well. The diabetes got easier to cope with after a few months for me. Once I'd got past the major 'firsts' it all started to run more smoothly. Although there will always be highs and lows, I handle them a lot better now!

    Let me know if you have any questions and would like a teenage perspective.
     
  5. MamaC

    MamaC Approved members

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    Answering Sarah's call for reinforcements :D My son was dx'ed 6 years ago at age 13. have experience with hypoglycemia and management during competitive and extreme sports.

    Where are you located? Feel free to PM me here.
     
  6. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

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    My son was also diagnosed at 15, which was 2.5 years ago. The initial days and weeks are beyond frightening, frustrating, maddening. All I can tell you is take it a day, a step, a shot, sometimes a second at a time. It WILL get easier. It WILL be better. He will be OK, in fact, he'll be more than OK, he'll be fabulous and wonderful and you'll consider him your own personal hero, though the rest of the world won't know he's any different for the most part.

    You'll dream in numbers for a while. You'll cry for no reason, at odd times. You'll put on a brave face to your friends and wish that someone understood. WE understand, so lean on us. Ask questions, give specifics, there is not one parent here who has not walked in your shoes. Pretty soon you'll realize you woke up thinking about what to wear, instead of blood sugar. A week will go by and you'll realize you haven't cried once. Then a month...then you'll cry again for no real reason but you'll know it's OK by then. And on and on. You'll find a new normal in which diabetes is simply another task. I didn't believe that when I was told that...but it's true.

    My son has been intensely independent since the day he was diagnosed, he tests, injects himself, I'm sort of the researcher and informant! He plays defense on his football team, is a team captain, rides horses, lifts weights, runs, pretty much whatever he wants.

    Feel free to PM me if you need more support, I know exactly what it's like to have a newly diagnosed teenager. Teens are a challenge anyway, add in this at such a crucial time...not independent but striving to be...add in something that they NEED you for and it's just a mixed up time.

    Really glad you found this place, it'll help more than anything.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012
  7. OSUMom

    OSUMom Approved members

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    Hi Clare - welcome. I'm so sorry for your son's diagnosis. My son was diagnosed at 18 and from the beginning testing his own blood sugar and giving himself his own shots. For a few months it is a whirlwind as a family we figured out what it meant to count carbs, dose insulin, and where to find the best carb and type 1 information. Let us know how we can help. For me, to have people who understand exactly what you're going through is so powerful. We care. :cwds::cwds:
     
  8. Flutterby

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    I don't have any older child, but thought maybe having him meet up with some kids his own age might be good for him. I know there is a kids forum here, not sure how busy it is, but maybe he'd like to check it out, see that he's not by himself. Of course, having a buddy in real life would be better.

    The craziness of newly diagnosed does calm down, it won't always be so crazy.
     
  9. Mrs Puff

    Mrs Puff Approved members

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    My son was diagnosed just after his 13th birthday, almost two years ago. He really never got too emotional about it. One time he told me that he likes to forget he has the betes until it is time to eat, then he deals with his shot, and gets on with life. It really isn't denial, he just doesn't dwell on it. He has no problem whipping out his supplies and checking himself in public when needed. In the beginning I wasn't regularly checking him during the night. There were several times when he asked me to because it would make him feel better knowing that he wasn't going low in his sleep. Of course I obliged. (Now that I know more, I check him every night at midnight, sometimes I do a 2am as well.) Sometime his big brother and little sister get a little frustrated that he gets coddled a little bit. I may help him out more when it comes to getting his dinner or snack, but I may tell the other two to get their own. Big brother told him to man-up and fix his own burrito today. They don't realize the pain in the butt of putting refried beans in a measuring cup and scraping it back out. Someday he will be doing all of it on his own, so I don't mind doing it for him part of the time. His numbers have been wacky lately (joys of puberty) and I said something about when he got older it would stabilize more. He said maybe there would be a cure and he wouldn't have to deal with it anymore.
     
  10. Mrs Puff

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    I wanted to add to my previous post that using insulin pens was a huge blessing! It made it so much easier for my son to give his own shots. In the hospital we were trained with a vial and syringe. It was wobbly and scary. We were sent home with samples of pens and I was so much easier. He uses a nano needle which is very small.

    Invest in good measuring cups!!! Since we have to measure everything, and I sometimes use the cup as a scooper, I have managed to break most of the handles off of about five different sets of cups!
     
  11. Ali

    Ali Approved members

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    Just as a counter to the pens. I find syringes and vials much much easier to use then pens. But try everything and find what your kid likes best.:cwds:ali Agree with the suggestion to use the finest (finest gauge) and shortest needle you can for your size body.
     
  12. MomofSweetOne

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    And in a scale that measure carb counts. Worth every cent. We have a Perfect Portions we got at Bed, Bath, and Beyond.
     
  13. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    It is a hard age to be diagnosed at. Just when the most important thing in the world is fitting in with ones peers, along comes something that makes one different. I think counselling is key if you can swing it.

    Much of the emotions may also be coming from out of range BG. DD is extremely argumentative when her blood sugars are much too high and can be grumpy when they are low.

    It takes a while to stop feeling so overwhelmed. I think that the sooner the parents accept the diagnosis, the sooner the child does. Type 1 absolutely sucks and it is impossible to like it, but you can still do all the things you love and enjoy your life. DD would certainly be relieved to be free of it, but she is so grateful for the wonderful people and opportunities it has brought into her life, that she would not change her fate if she could.

    Have you looked into any events in your area that would help you and your son connect with others? Check with you local JDRF chapter or your clinic for support groups in your area. When DD was about to leave the hospital after having her tonsils out, a newly diagnosed boy your son's age was brought into the bed beside hers. He was definitely more willing to take on his shots and his diabetes after seeing this little girl do it so bravely.

    Help him as much as he will let you (and a little more) and get help for yourself if you can.
     
  14. DsMom

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    My son was dx at age 4...so his experience will be much different than your son's. However, as moms, I don't think it matters at what age our kids are dx, I think the experience is fairly similar for most of us.:( I'm sorry you have to be here.:(

    As a teenager, it may be helpful for your son to google famous people with Type 1 diabetes. Does he know there is an Indy car driver with Type 1....Charlie Kimball? My son loves watching his races and cheering for him. There are other sports and entertainment figures...and of course countless every-day people...he may be able to identify with and realize that D does not have to limit his life. I have 2 adult nieces with D...one dx at age 2 and one at age 25. Both are living happy and full lives. My one niece is extremely active, she has run triathalons, she kayaks and hikes, and travels extensively (she is a flight attendant). She is also pregnant with her first child!:) My other niece has 2 young kids, has also traveled a lot, and is complication free after having D almost her whole life. In other words, they are living "normal" lives...and your son will, too.

    It will probably feel rough for a while...the best thing you can do is be forgiving toward yourself and not feel like you need to know it all right away. It takes some time to learn all this...so I would emphasize that to your son as well. It can feel like a whole lot of stuff crashing down on you at once...and it is overwhelming. Just deal with learning the basics right now. You will not always feel the way you do today...and neither will he. Although D is a permanent thing, these feelings and the way your life feels right now is not. It may be hard to believe that your son's D will fade into the background in your life...but it can.

    Good luck.:cwds:
     
  15. Daniel's Mom 1993

    Daniel's Mom 1993 Approved members

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    My son was dx'd at 14 on 8/28/07 - he just started college...it was very difficult at first and I remember Daniel getting frustrated but it did get better and he has done very well - he played football for a couple of years then decided to stop that and get a job which he has had for 2 yrs now , he works out regularly , he never missed out on anything he ate the same as everyone else at school and when he went out woth friends he just had to test his bs, count carbs and take insulin he was never embarrassed to do these things infront of friends. So it does get better...Daniel has always looked at dealing wth diabetes like brushing his teeth - he just has to do it! Good luck
     
  16. Joretta

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    My daughter was 13, 3 years ago. I have cried many a day, she has had the same roller coaster of emotion including days of denial. It does get easier and you learn ways to help them refind their independence. Cell phone helps a lot if you can afford one. My daughter does weightlifting and plans to try cross country this year.
     
  17. Bigbluefrog

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    It will get better. I felt in the beginning all the information was overwhelming but with classes and reading books it gave me the answers I needed to understand the basics of this dynamic disease.

    A teenage boy with growth hormones, and possibly in honeymoon phase, that would be challenging for anyone.

    Hang in there.

    The Honeymoon stage may happen in the beginning of being diagnosed. The body still produces some insulin and you can see swings in blood glucose numbers.
     
  18. buckmarko

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    Hi Clare, I'm so sorry about your son's diagnosis. My son (at 10) was diagnosed last October, so almost a year. I quote many here that the first few weeks are the hardest. There are so many emotions, many tears, much worrying, and much learning. No matter what age of diagnosis, it is hard! It seems like the first year is the "firsts" as you learn. I remember all I wanted to do was read and research to find out as much info as I could.
    Just some recommendations:
    *I know someone on here usually recommends books, and one of them he lists and I too highly recommend is "Think Like a Pancreas" by Gary Scheiner. There is an updated version recently released.
    *I also recommend a food scale. Some recommend a carb scale, but I just use a food scale I ordered from amazon (EatSmart Precision Pro Digital Kitchen Scale-I can't believe it still works for the abuse it takes!). For me, weighing is usually easier than measuring.
    *One thing that also really helped me was learning to use carb factors, especially for stuff like cereal. You can google it, or pm me.
    *When you have free time, I recommend reading the thread "10 things your endo never told you" It has some great info.
    I can't say yet that things are "easy" and second nature for us yet, but It is better. You learn as you go. What may work for one person, may not work for another. This forum has a wealth of information.
    You'll be in my thoughts and prayers.
     
  19. VinceysMom

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    Pretty much EVERYTHING what Nancy said, she and I communicated quite a bit in the early days of our sons dx, around the same age, same sport, etc.

    My son is still MDI. So far he has no desire to pump. My son was dx 12/26/09 at age 13, he is now 16. My son no longer plays football, but loves his baseball and plays summer and fall baseball!
     

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