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I have a favor to ask..

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by lynn, Oct 2, 2010.

  1. funnygrl

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    I don't know about Medicaid, but I know many doctors do not accept Medicare because reimbursements are so low they simply cannot afford to.
     
  2. MReinhardt

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    If I remember correctly, One of Chell's drs visit with a specialist, medicare paid them $25.00 I'm not kidding either! Medicaid picked up the rest. I was totally shocked & saddened what Medicare paid.
     
  3. lynn

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    Ah, but the catch is that she has a cheap BCBS policy as well as. There is no prescription coverage from it even. That, however will be gone when my dad dies because it is part of the alimony package from their divorce. Hmm, now I am wondering about it. My dad is very near the end of his life. He is amazing all of his doctors that he is still with us now. Maybe her doctor won't be thrilled when all she has is medicaid....
     
  4. C6H12O6

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    What does your son use as a pump backup ? What would be available to your son in terms of insulin if he decided he needed a break from the pump. (I stock backup insulin at every opportunity even though I have a backup pump.)

    If you were to purchase NPH in Canada you would get a free pen of your choice either novolin or humulin. The only reason I mention NPH is bc the cost of lantus is not much cheaper in Canada. I mention Canada bc you live in MI and bc the pen is free w. insulin purchase and NPH is much cheaper in Canada. (Also, many people w. T2 use NPH successfully)
     
  5. lynn

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    My son uses Levemir, which I would give to her. The problem is that our insurance won't pay for pens if you have the pump. She is unable to use a vial of insulin because of her shakiness.
     
  6. funnygrl

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    I think Medicaid is much better. One of our social workers at the hospital said she likes it when her clients have Medicaid, because they're the easiest to get coverage with.
     
  7. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    I just had a thought about shakiness. I used to use (I've lost it) something to help with shots. You put the syringe inside, you pressed the button to send the needle zooming out, and you pressed the plunger down and that was the shot. It was big and fat and easier to hold than a syringe. I'm wondering if it would help.
    I think it was the Inject-Ease.
     
  8. C6H12O6

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    Well you could pre fill say 7 syringes of the levimir and leave them out on a clean flat surface.

    Uncapping the syringe is actually easier and involves fewer steps than screwing on a pen needle etc.
    And lots of people inject levimir once daily
     
  9. Lee

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    This bugs me so much, that people do not have access to the medications that save their life; simply because they were not privileged enough to afford a decent retirement plan, health care, and disposable income.

    It shames me that we live in a Nation that lets people die rather then buying them a vial of insulin. My Dad's life could have been extended by years if he had access ti health care and medications. Unfortunately, he was uninsured, to young for medicare, and by the time he paid upfront for his first year of treatment, beyond broke.

    I am sorry your mom is going through this.

    On a side note, pens that expired 7 months ago probably wouldn't help, huh? I think prefilling syringes is a good game plan.
     
  10. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    Prefilling syringes a week in advance is risky. I read a great study linked to here (from Ellen, I think) where a doctor was curious and got various brands of syringes and filled them with Lantus and stored them in various ways and tested their pH after different numbers of hours/days. If Lantus has had a change in pH, it has a significant change in how long it works for. A number of the syringes' lantus lost pH within 12 hours. Since I read that, I've stopped filling syringes with Lantus for later use.
     
  11. Ali

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    It sounds like she will need someone to give her shots. With her memory and shakiness I think the only safe option will probably be for someone to give her the shots. The pre filled syringes would be easy for anyone to do. With memory issues and seniors you almost always need someone else to handle their medications. If you can not get insulin it may be that you will need to take her daily to a public health clinic and have them give her the insulin till her prescriptions are filled. Good luck.
     
  12. KHM

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    I would encourage you to ne forthright with your social worker regarding all of these concerns. It does not appear to be a simple need for help with diabetes scripts.
     
  13. sooz

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    Im sure there are people on here who know more than I do about it, however it is my understanding that you dont give up medicare when you also get medicaid..medicaid suppliments the medicare, you keep both. Also, if she gets social security, she can also apply for SSI which is a federal suplimental program to social security that will probably double her income from social security. It sounds like she would qualify for it.

    My mother in law who will be 90 next week has lived with us for the last several years, but it became increasingly dangerous for her to stay here because of her alzheimer's diagnoses and her feeble condition. Her room was on the second floor right next to the stairs. She started having mini seizures and would fall to the floor and the last time she really hurt her face. We felt it would be negligent to keep her here even though she wanted to stay, and we called 911 and they took her to the hospital to find out why she was falling so much. From there, she was able to go to a skilled nursing facility for about a month for physical therapy to help her get stronger, and on monday she is being moved to an assisted living home. All of this was paid for with her medicare and medicaid. She had SSI before she came to live with us, they took it away because we of course were not charging her to live here. Now that she is going into the assisted living home they will reinstate the SSI and that along with her social security will pay for a really nice room, all her meals, transportation, doctor's visits, haircuts, personal care (she is in diapers at this point), laundry, etc. We were told that nursing homes and assisted living places dont take medicare patients usually UNLESS they are coming from a hospital, then medicare kicks in. Not all assisted living places take medicare but this one does and seems very nice. If you want to see pictures of the kind of place your mother might live in check out the one my mother in law is going to www.arcadianretirement.com

    I know your mother will cry and be upset to move from her home, but once she is settled in she will be ok. You have to consider what is safest for her and what might ultimately destroy your health and welfare if you continue to sacrifice your family for her. I know what a hard decision it is and my heart goes out to you. I totally agree that America needs to take care of its elderly and poor. I encourage you to talk to the social workers and the doctor directly and not rely on information from your mother. Also if you dont have it already, you should get a durable power of attorney with an advanced health care directive that would enable you to make decisions for her.

    When our children/grandchildren were diagnosed with D we often speak of it as our 'new reality.' This is the new reality for your mother and my mother in law. Not one that they or we would have wanted for them, but it is what it is. The new reality...you know?
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2010
  14. lynn

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    Thank you, Susan. Does your mother-in-law get to provide her own furniture?
     
  15. sooz

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    We can take what ever we want to put in her room, but they also provide it if we take nothing. We plan on taking her recliner and tv and they are going to be giving her a hospital bed because she has trouble sleeping flat. We are going to wait until she is there to see what else she wants/needs. We probably will go with their dresser, but if she wants her's we will take it.
     
  16. Flutterby

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    Does she use the standard amount of lantus (meaning, is it the same daily)? I'm just wondering if someone can prefill the syringe for her.. when someone is over visiting, get it ready for her? Sounds like you have a plan for people staying with her.. maybe they could help? If you can get a vial of lantus while you are figuring out insurance issues maybe that will help a bit?
     
  17. Lisa P.

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    I don't normally jump to this, but if your mom is not on anti-anxiety medication you should really, really talk to her doctor about it. I think it is perfectly reasonable to want to stay in your own home, absolutely. But moving into on room and preferring death to leaving the house -- that sounds like she's developing an anxiety disorder? If she is sad at the idea of leaving, that's understandable, I'd be, too. But if she approaches panic, that's something else.

    I think it might be tough in Michigan right now to get a lot of assistance, I imagine they are overwhelmed. I'm sure you'll keep plugging away but I think you are admirable for exploring all options.

    If you can manage a way to get her shots, you can probably get help from someone here. :cwds: We don't do the pen and I'm so sorry, we are very tight right now ourselves.

    Is there a Catholic social services organization in your town? I was involved with one for awhile, they interview people in need and will give them bridge assistance, I think you certainly would qualify. No need at all to be a member of the parish, or even Catholic, I don't think anyone I saw there was Catholic.

    I'm sure other larger churches have similar help.
     
  18. MikailasMom

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    If she is confused with numbers, is dosing her own insulin a good idea? And if she is unstable with balance she is a VERY high risk for falls, which could lead to broken hips ect, which some patients sadly don't recover from. I'm not a "stick em in a home" kinda girl, but I am worried for not only her but for the rest of your family. It is VERY hard to care for a ill elderly family member. Alot like D it effects everyone, more than we would normally realize.

    Hugs to you! Sorry I dont have any Lantus! Hope everything works out for you!

    Candi
     
  19. lynn

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    To address the questions raised.

    Yes, she is on a set dose of insulin daily. Her doctor had her on way to high of a dose so she was having severe lows in the night. Before her strokes I tried to talk to her about lowering her dose but she didn't want to because he had told her how much to take! She doesn't see and endo and won't. When she was in the hospital she had a few lows in the 20s. They kept her at the dose the doctor gave her. Her first day here I gave her drastically less and she still ended up in the bathroom puking with a 24. She now has it set quite well and we aren't changing it unless it becomes obvious that she is high way too often.

    I was worried about her and her shots when she left my house because my brother and his wife had no intention of helping her with it. I wrote down in large numbers the dose and she practiced dialing it up several times. Now she still has that paper beside her. She is scared to dose wrong so she takes a long time checking and rechecking and rechecking to make sure she is right. I feel pretty confident that she can do that.

    Her shakiness and giving a shot: She has been dealing with that for a long time and she has it figured out in a way that works for her. The pen is big and she can hold it with both hands. A syringe is too small for her. When I or one of my kids is there we could do her shot, but the rest of the family is going to HAVE to get involved and they can't handle shots. They won't and it is pointless to try.

    Lisa: To say that she needs some medication is the understatement of the century! She has taken Prozac way back when, but she seems to not remember it now. I suggested that she talk to the doctor about trying something now and she got quite angry with me. I am going to call and talk to his nurse today though. She and I are getting quite tight since August! I will be bringing her back for an appointment soon so maybe the doctor will talk to her about it. And, you're right, Michigan is tough to get help right now. The state is very poor.

    Thank you all for your help!
     
  20. deafmack

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    Hello Lynn,
    I will pm you with some information.
     

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