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Hypothyroidism and D?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by T1Spouse&Proud, Sep 28, 2008.

  1. T1Spouse&Proud

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    My wife might have Hypothyroid, anyone have any experience? How does it affect D? We are having a fasting blood draw on Monday, but she does have all the symptoms. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Abby-Dabby-Doo

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    Here are the symptoms of Hypothyroidism
    Fatigue
    Sluggishness
    Increased sensitivity to cold
    Constipation
    Pale, dry skin
    A puffy face
    Hoarse voice
    An elevated blood cholesterol level
    Unexplained weight gain
    Muscle aches, tenderness and stiffness
    Pain, stiffness or swelling in your joints
    Muscle weakness
    Heavier than normal menstrual periods
    Brittle fingernails and hair
    Depression

    Here are the symtoms of Hashimoto's Disease
    Increased sensitivity to cold
    Constipation
    Pale, dry skin
    A puffy face
    Hoarse voice
    An elevated blood cholesterol level
    Unexplained weight gain — occurring infrequently and rarely more than 10 to 20 pounds, most of which is fluid
    Muscle aches, tenderness and stiffness, especially in your shoulders and hips
    Pain and stiffness in your joints and swelling in your knees or the small joints in your hands and feet
    Muscle weakness, especially in your lower extremities
    Excessive or prolonged menstrual bleeding (menorrhagia)
    Depression

    Granted my daughter is only 7, was dxd in June with Hashimoto's disease- and I didn't think she had any symptoms until I started really thinking about it and then still I really wonder if they were REALLY symptoms or not.
    Constipation she's struggled with for years, hoarse voice occasionally, and muscle aches I thought had to do with the sports she was involved in. She also has brittle hair and nails.


    Edited to add: It really doesn't effect her D at all. It's a pill in the morning before she eats anything (up to an hour). One pill a day.
     
  3. T1Spouse&Proud

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    Abby- Thanks for your info, I would say she has about 8 out of 10 symptoms. Did you find it increased her overall Insulin needs? My wife is normaly on 31 units of lantus, then she went on steriods and went up to 37 units,and she has been off steroids for 3 months now and her lantus needs have not changed. If anything she needs more fast acting than usual lately.
    Thanks again.
     
  4. 4.my.son

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    I have had Hypothyroidism since I was 11 and I am now 42 it can be controlled by a pill. once she gets meds she will feel alot better , more energy, better concentration, weight will come off. People with this gain weight even if they eat like a bird. if hormones are off it does not matter , it will all be ok though once meds kick in should feel a big differance it how ya feel . to much makes your heart race . not enough makes you feel sluggish. mood should calm down to. if I don't take mine right I feel like I am going crazy take same time every day on empty belly with water. Don't be afaid to tell doc if you still feel tired they will have to adjust till they get dose right when its right , you won't feel as hungry and more energy and weight will come off some.
    If doc will give a little fluid pill that helps . when I first found out , I lost 70lbs in 3 months. and I felt so much better.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2008
  5. robinseggs

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    Derek, Mandy has hypothyroid and it greatly affected her diabetes which is one of the reasons we figured out there was more going on than just diabetes. For a time her blood sugars had been dropping and normal doses of her long acting insulin were lasting for days or more! This was not her honeymoon as she had already honeymooned possibly several times we thought. Well for a few days she didn't have insulin at all and the blood work was already done so when doc called it was hypothyroid....and yes just a little pill every day...Robin
     
  6. T1Spouse&Proud

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    Thank you everyone, Christine feels much better after hearing these post, funny she is actually hoping it's Hypothyroid so she can feel better.
    FYI- Something I did not know, some Hypothyroid is an auto-immune disease.
    Makes more sense I guess.
     
  7. 4.my.son

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    Key Points
    Thyroid problems are not a complication of diabetes, but do occur more often in people with diabetes.
    The thyroid is a small gland that makes thyroid hormones

    Problems can happen if it makes too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism), or too little thyroid hormone (hypothyroidism)

    People with diabetes who develop either hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism may find it hard to manage their diabetes

    Both thyroid conditions are treatable





    What is the thyroid?

    The thyroid is a small gland in the lower part of the neck. It manufactures essential hormones that help regulate cell activity in our bodies. For example:

    Some cells depend on thyroid hormones to regulate metabolism. Metabolism is a broad term referring to all the chemical reactions that are carried out in the body's cells, including digestion

    Other cells, such as cells in the bones, hair and teeth, use thyroid hormones to grow and mature
    All of the glands in our bodies depend upon one another to function properly. The thyroid gland, for example, depends upon the pituitary gland to help control the production of thyroid hormones. The pituitary gland produces thyroid stimulating hormone (or TSH). This hormone promotes thyroid hormone production and releases the hormones into the blood stream.

    When the thyroid hormone level is low, the pituitary gland senses this and releases TSH, which, in turn, tells the thyroid gland to make and release thyroid hormone into the bloodstream.

    This process is often compared to the working of a furnace: a thermostat senses cold air, tells the furnace to turn on and produce heat, and when the air is warm enough, the thermostat tells the furnace to shut off.


    Hypothyroidism

    Hypothyroidism is when there is too little thyroid hormone circulating in the body. Its symptoms include:

    Fatigue

    Hair loss

    Weight gain

    Constipation

    Listlessness and depression

    Memory loss and mental "dullness"

    Muscle and joint pain

    High cholesterol levels

    Feeling cold (when no one else is)

    Husky voice

    Dry skin
    Heavy periods (in women)
    Hypothyroidism does not cause only one of the above symptoms. If several of these symptoms are present, have your doctor check for hypothyroidism. Furthermore, weight gain and being very overweight are not always caused by thyroid problems.

    People with hypothyroidism will probably need to take a synthetic thyroid hormone for life. Your doctor will help you decide how much of this medication you need by doing blood tests and assessing how you feel.


    Hyperthyroidism

    Hyperthyroidism is the opposite of hypothyroidism - too much thyroid hormone is being produced. Common symptoms include:

    Weight loss

    Diarrhoea

    Feeling hot (when no one else is)

    A pounding heart

    Tremor of the hands

    Hair loss

    Feelings of nervousness and irritability

    Insomnia or restlessness

    In women, light or decreased periods
    Hyperthyroidism may be treated with medication, radioactive iodine or surgery. Your doctor will do blood tests and assess your symptoms in order to help you get treatment.


    Diabetes and Hypothyroidism

    Studies have shown that the incidence of hypothyroidism seems to be increased in both people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, especially women over the age of 40. If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it is a good idea to have your doctor check your TSH levels every 5 years to pick up any hypothyroidism that might be starting.

    People with diabetes who develop hypothyroidism may find it hard to manage their diabetes. This is because the way their body uses glucose is altered.

    Fatigue may set in and you won't feel like undertaking any physical activity. This may lead to weight gain from the decreased physical activity and a slower metabolism.

    However, once a person with hypothyroidism receives thyroid replacement medication, their thyroid levels usually return to normal, as does their diabetes medication requirements.
     
  8. T1Spouse&Proud

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    Thank you everyone who responded. Lab work came back today, no thyroid issues. Good news A1c was 5.4

    So we are thinking maybe it has something to do with post pregnancy and Depo shot? We will figure it out. Thanks though.
     
  9. GAmom

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    maybe restest in a year

    My type 1 dd has hashimoto. last year labwork came back normal, this year way way abnormal. so, personnally,I would retest in a year if she still is exhibiting symptoms. the symptoms my dd had , were present since dx, almost 3 years ago, though her labwork came back fine the previous two years. the only new symptom was a doubling of her cholestrol #'s
    Hope you guys get it figured out.
    ps: my dd's BG have improved a little since dx of hashmito and synthroid
     

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