- advertisement -

Huge attitude, driving me nuts

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by CassiesMama, Mar 14, 2010.

  1. CassiesMama

    CassiesMama Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    363
    Ok I have to ask but have any of you had massive attitude out of your kids a few months after dx. I am asking cause my dear sweet daughter is acting like a pissed off teenager at only 9. Its 5 am here and the child will not go to bed been trying to keep her in her bed for the last 7 hours and she just wont go to sleep, keeps saying she not tired checked her she has normal numbers. I dont know what to do with her any more she is screaming and crying about wanting to be left alone when we ask her to do things like clean her room or go to bed. I am thinking the D has some part in this I just dont know which part. Do I need to get her into a therapist or something else. Any input you guys have would be a huge help. Thank you.
     
  2. Toni

    Toni Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Messages:
    2,882
    Yes, she did have that "teen attitude" after being diagnosed. Usually grumpy if high. I leave her to her own devices (after correction) if high. Now she is 13. It gets worse.:D I just think if they have a day of fluctuating BGs, it will effect mood. And it would be normal to be angry after getting D; they suppress it somewhat and it comes out here and there. Encourage them to let their feelings out, not hold things in. Nothing wrong with therapy; you could try that. P.S. Whether she can get to sleep or not, lights out and in bed if it is 5 a.m.
     
  3. meg9901

    meg9901 Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2009
    Messages:
    205
    Our daughter had some challenges with behavior and some mild anxiety surrounding diagnosis around the time she turned nine. None of it was an issue at school or with extended family friends. It was almost entirely in the context of the family and regular routine.
    A therapist that we saw as a family for a few months helped tremendously to give her a structure and some simple tools/vocabulary for walking through situations that were difficult for her. And the difficulty wasn't the shots or testing. It really didn't have much to do with D. But somehow the turmoil of the diagnosis brought on some stress that we thought needed to be dealt with.
    It's much better now. I'm so glad we sought the help when we did. Insurance covered it, by the way.
     
  4. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    5,560
    I think it worthwhile to work with a counselor. Her anxiety with being alone or aboubt sleeping isn't usual behavior. She appears deeply concerned about something that the diabetes diagnosis triggered and a counselor can help root this out.
     
  5. Ed2009

    Ed2009 Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2009
    Messages:
    261
    I agree with all the posts. Being diagnosed is not just an "OK, that's it, carry on". Children have to live with a new body that requires now intensive care and management, not to say an unwanted subscription to permanent small discomforts.

    We had help from a counselor, and it worked really, really well. Perhaps she did not say different things than we did as parents, but having the boy listening to an "independent third party" helped him to understand things better and cope with them. Personally I think that most (though not all) mood fluctuations have much more to do with the shock of the diagnosis and condition, rather than a high of a low.
     
  6. diabetesgoddess

    diabetesgoddess Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    34
    My child was diagnosed very young but there was his own form of rebellion. I was told that he felt out of control because of the change in routine and lifestyle. He was suddenly being poked and bled on a regular basis. I had to take control in certain areas and also allow him some control as well. In our case, it was allowing him to choose where to inject, rewards when he complied, etc. I would definitely try a therapist if possible or a support group where she can speak with others her own age and see how they cope.
     
  7. Skyefire

    Skyefire Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    Messages:
    1,083
    Some of it is just the age!! My dd is 10 going on 11 and I do child care for 4 other girls all between the ages of 8-11 and the Attitude is CRAZY!! I do think Emily (D) has one of the worst attitudes, cranky mouthy etc but then again the others have there days with my own dd topping the list!
     
  8. mom2Hanna

    mom2Hanna Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2008
    Messages:
    972
    My 9 yo non-d who has always been the easiest kid is turning into miss attitude also. I really think its the age for her, she is making that switch from being a little girl into a preteen. I'm sure adding d into the mix at this age would just make it harder. I know I struggle with my 12 yo knowing if the behavior is diabetes or normal puberty/hormone stuff.
     
  9. CassiesMama

    CassiesMama Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    363
    Thanks guys, I think when we go to the endo on friday I will ask them if they have a list of therapists that work well with kids who are newly dx'd. We use to get a little bit of attitude before but now its just crazy. I hope it helps. After I posted I sat down and asked her to just tell me what was wrong took a few but then she just started balling about how much she hates D, and how unfair it is. I told her I can understand that she hates it and wishes it would never had picked her but that was no reason to be disrespectful to us or not follow the rules around the house. Also told her that we will try to find her a feelings doc. I know this too shall pass but man give us a break already, lol.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice