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How To Wear My Pump

Discussion in 'Teens' started by karpoozi123, Dec 19, 2005.

  1. karpoozi123

    karpoozi123 Approved members

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    I was wondering if anyone has any tips for where to wear the pump. I have worn it in a thigh pouch (hidden) for 3 years. I find it such a pain to keep it hidden though. Most people already know that I am a diabetic so I dont know what I am hiding. I am considering wearing it in plain sight, but I am nervous. What will people say? Does anyone have any tips or sugestions? Thanx!:rolleyes:
     
  2. chappy

    chappy New Member

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    Hey, I've been on the pump for a little less than a year. I wear it on my thigh sometimes when I wear a dress or skirt, otherwise, its too much of a hassel to me so I usually just wear it on my pant pocket, back pocket, waist or wherever is convenient at the time. People don't really notice it, and if they do they usually think it something like a cellphone or pager..mp3 player ..
     
  3. Nana

    Nana Approved members

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    Hey :)

    I have been on te pump since 2002, and I have never wear it hidden :) I usually wear it on a belt or something like that. My friends also know I have diabetes, but sometimes somebody who doesn't know, asks me what is that (pump), or the just thinks that iit's a cellhone. So it is no problem for me :)
     
  4. faithe113001

    faithe113001 Approved members

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    Hi, I've been on the pump for 3 years, and have always worn it in my pants pocket. Except when I wear a skirt, then I have a thigh pouch that I wear it in. Don't worry about people reacting funny to your pump suddenly being out in the open...I think that if everyone pretty much knows about your diabetes, you should be fine. Even if they have a weird reaction, don't worry about it!!
     
  5. karpoozi123

    karpoozi123 Approved members

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    Thanx But...

    I dont want to remind people that I am a diabetic. I dont want it to be that they look at me and say oh right, she is the one with diabetes. Is the pump going to be to much of a reminder?
     
  6. munchkingirl

    munchkingirl Approved members

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    Karpoozi,

    I totally understand not wanting to have people be reminded by the pump that you're diabetic. I understand not wanting to be identified by it. But in all reality, those who really care about you just think of you being diabetic as another little character trait, like those with asthma, or glasses. You wouldn't loook at those people and instantly think of them as - oh, right, the asthmatic. - but rather first your friend, then maybe the friend who is loving, caring, a good listener... and so on - and somewhere down the list of things an asthmatic.

    I've only been on my pump for two weeks now and have worn it on my hip everywhere. I expected every last person I know to come and ask me about it - because i've kept my diabetes hidden from people for so long (which led to high a1c's because I wouldn't care for it) that they'd suddenly wonder what's up. But only two people have asked me about it. And one I didn't even know, he only asked me about it because he has a friend who also has a pump!

    I have to tell you, though, that the first couple of days of having the pump were emotional ones for me. I was in tears because of it, actually. See, my family is pretty physical - we like to rough house a lot, tickling especially. My boyfriend also comes from the same sort of family - and that first week it seemed that EVERYONE was afraid to touch me - afraid to hurt me because I had a tube attached to me. ...I talked to my boyfriend about it and he was all like - "No, Bethany, it does NOT change how we see you - especially me - this will make your life BETTER - not worse. I understand your fear of not being played with anymore, but that isn't there. You do have to understand, though, that it does require *just a little* extra caution because of the tubing. And if me or your family gets really rough - just unhook yourself for a few minutes and it's all better!..." And to be honest - it's been just that way too! I haven't ever needed to take off my pump while roughhouseing yet. And we've done quite a bit of it. Actually, my family doesn't even mention my pump to me except maybe my mom'll ask me about bs's or my dad the other day was concerned that it was gonna get caught on something because of the way I was wearing it. But thats been about it.

    The effects that the pump has had on my blood sugars and my life have been so great in these two weeks that it far outweighs any other worries such as you're now having as well.

    I hope you have a wonderful Christmas!

    Beth
     
  7. karpoozi123

    karpoozi123 Approved members

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    Thank You!!

    Thanx a lot for your reply. I read it twice!:) I still dont know if I will have the courage to wear it openly but I definately will think about it more seriously. I have been off of the pump for a while (because of an infection) but I hope to go back on it soon. Maybe the day that I go back on I will wear it out- to celebrate! Thanks again!
     
  8. munchkingirl

    munchkingirl Approved members

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    You're Welcome!

    Hey, You're so welcome. I sympathize SO much with you about not wanting people to know. Oh boy do I.... ...I have definitely abused my body because of it - and am suffering some nasty repercussions because of it. Over the last three years I decided that I didn't want *anyone* to know at all about my diabetes tat didn't have to know, or didn't already know (even if they "had" to know, I didn't tell most anyways.) - And so when I went places I wouldn't check my blood sugar or take my insulin or anything because of it. And I would end up with 600+ blood sugars. I've been in DKA more times than I'd like to say. ...so, yeah. It's definitely hard, for sure! But, it's worth it to take care of ourselves for those we love and who love us. (Not saying you're not taking care of yourself by ANY means!).

    How you wanna wear your pump is all up to your personel preference. Just know that - no one judges you for it. Some people don't understand and may think you were a "bad" diabetic and now are SO sick that you HAVE to have a pump (My one friend who asked me about it thought that), but it just takes a little extra time to explain that it was YOUR choice and that it makes your life better than injections (if that's the case for you).

    Have a great day!

    Beth
     
  9. karpoozi123

    karpoozi123 Approved members

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    I know what you mean...

    I was just in the hospital for uncontrolled numbers for a week. I know that part of the reason things got so out of control is because I had missed some boluses because wearing my pump under my clothes would cause some very funny looks if I tried to bolus in public. Now I am trying to correct that whole cycle cuz I dont want to go back into the hospital. Putting my pump under my clothes is a very bad start! Thanx again for your help!
     
  10. munchkingirl

    munchkingirl Approved members

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    Not a problem at all. I just want to try and help how I can. I see people in similar situations or could get into them - and I know what a hell (excuse me) of a year it's been for me because of my issues - and would really like to spare others from the same thing. Ya know? It's kinda like "been there, done that, don't want anyone else to be there either" of course, I can't keep everyone from it, but I can do my part, right?

    Anyways. Talk to you later!

    Beth
     
  11. researcher2005

    researcher2005 New Member

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    veteran pumper

    Hi! I have had a pump for 12 years and have never hid my pump. I have been taken to the office many times by teachers who had no idea what a pump was, thinking it was a pager or cell phone. I have been in college now for 6 years, and haven't had that problem. But I don't even wear a cover over mine. I block my keys so I can't accidentaly hit a button. I have dropped it, played pick-up games of basketball with it on, and roughhoused with my dad, brother, uncle, and husband. Needless to say, I have lost a cannula every now and then, but it was all worth it. Usually if I an exercising, losing my pump doesn't affect my sugars. Wear it proudly. There's nothing to be ashamed of.
     
  12. karpoozi123

    karpoozi123 Approved members

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    Have you ever gotten any really strange questions?
     
  13. kitty

    kitty Approved members

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    If you wear it in plain sight, most people will probably think its a beeper and think nothing of it.

    I put my pump that I use for spasticity in my legs (I don't have diabetes, so I use a pump for the other thing)., in a small pouch that's attached to me like a belt. My pouch is light purple and has Garfield all over it. A lady on Ebay makes homemade pump pouches like this.

    Jessie
     
  14. ctwetten

    ctwetten Approved members

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    I was diagnosed a year and a half ago and went on the pump last April. I've always worn it on my waist or pocket and the bigest change that I've noticed is that people say I look older--I figure it's because I look more important. :) Also, I just started college and it's nice to find people who know some stuff about diabetes and the pump is a great way to find them because if they had good friends who had the pump they just ask me about it, which can be taxing but also very comforting. I'm all about being simple with things like that. I think it saves lots of awkwardness and pain in the long run.
     

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