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How to Parent an Adolescent with Diabetes

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Michelle'sMom, Nov 1, 2011.

  1. Michelle'sMom

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  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Good read. Thanks for posting it.:cwds:
     
  3. wilf

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    Thank you for posting this. :)
     
  4. Ali

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    Excellent article. Thank you for posting. Ali
     
  5. obtainedmist

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    I was just stunned to read that 95% of T2 kids come from ethnic/minority and lower income families. Can this be correct?
     
  6. Michelle'sMom

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    I don't find that statistic surprising in the least. Certain ethnic groups are at higher risk for T2. Factor in the statistics on the number of minorities that fall into the lower income bracket, along with the fact that healthier foods also tend to be the most expensive, & it paints a pretty sad picture.
     
  7. Timmy Mac

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    i found it a really nice article except for one part. I don't mind to be nit-picky, but i don't really agree with this.

    "Thirteen-year-olds don't have the 'emotional muscle' to give themselves their own insulin shots, not week after week."

    I had both my doctors and parents pushing for me to take my own shots since I was about 7. Once I finally worked up the courage to give myself one of my shots when I was 12, I never let my parents give me a shot again.
     
  8. emm142

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    I think everyone is different in this respect. I was diagnosed at 14 and my parents never gave me a shot (and 14 isn't much different from 13, I imagine that I would have been the same if I were diagnosed a few months earlier). But for some people, leaving them alone at 13 to do all their shots forever would be disasterous. I agree that the article could have generalised slightly less on that one. But otherwise I also thought it was good.
     
  9. sarahspins

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    Well, I think a distinction has to be made between just administering insulin, and being in charge of determining insulin doses too.

    I would think that most 13 year olds would be fully capable of injecting themselves if mom/dad handed them a syringe and said "take ___ units" but remembering to do so without being told to, or calculating their own doses full time might be a bit much for some.. it's more about that kind of responsibility than the action itself. It may not be a problem for some.

    I try to think about how I was at 13 and I don't know that I would have wanted to do it all myself. I know I didn't want to do it at 20 but i didn't have any other options :)
     
  10. emm142

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    Oh, sure. I was thinking about dosing decisions etc., as well (I did everything on my own from 14), but probably should have been clearer about that.
     
  11. lisanc

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    Great article ... thanks for posting.
     
  12. Mrs Puff

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    Great article. I have said almost the exact thing (posted below) when I have tried to explain diabetes to people:

    "Yet the biggest myth the diabetes community often gives to families is that diabetes is entirely under our behavioral control. Like if you just do these things, everything's going to turn out fine. You can do them all today and blood sugars will turn out fine. Tomorrow you do the very same things and nothing works, your child's blood sugars are high all day. If parents think it's all under their control they're going to drive themselves and their child crazy."
     
  13. Tamara Gamble

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    Great article. Agree with Mrs Puff that it is not black and white. We have been very lucky with our son.
     

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