- advertisement -

How to inject insulin?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Serenia, Jul 21, 2012.

  1. Serenia

    Serenia Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2012
    Messages:
    56
    I have to ask another question.

    And knowing I am new here, I am injecting insulin 4 times daily - short and long acting both at breakfast, short acting at dinner and long acting at bedtime.

    My son hates being injected on his thighs so he only offers his arms for injections. I inject on the fatty undersides of the arm, never on the top or the sides.

    But I must be doing something wrong because he gets small bruises. When DH injects, they dont hurt him - or so he says. DH has T2D and has been using an pen for a good number of years.

    I wonder if its because I dont pull the pen straight out as much as I try to, or maybe I push too hard. What could I be doing wrong that causes bruises. I need to learn how to do this fast or some teacher at school is going to see these bruises and start thinking the worst...

    Does anyone have any ideas or links to good youtube videos I can watch?

    Thanks.
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,747
    My daughter had bruises a lot with MDI. So did a friend's son. Unfortunately, I think it's part of D-world. Since moving to the pump, though, we get red insertion spots, but the only bruise has been from an insertion from a camp nurse.:D

    It really hurts to see the marks on our kids' bodies. I remember taking my daughter swimming during her first year with D, and being heartbroken to see an armful of injection sites turning purple as she chilled. And the pump marks were very hard for me for a long while. Still are, if I allow myself to go there...
     
  3. Jason's mom

    Jason's mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2012
    Messages:
    77
    Sorry your guy is having to deal with the bruising.

    My son is also on MDI. We decided to rotate locations with the time of day. (Breakfast in his stomach, lunch in his arm, dinner in his hip, and bedtime in his thigh.) He had to get comfortable with the locations at first - especially the stomach (although I think that was more about the thought of it...). But, now it's habit for him, and at least it minimizes the number of times he gets poked in the same area.
     
  4. steph

    steph Approved members

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    177
    I think the belly is the easiest and least painful place to do injections. I use syringes, instead of pens. there are tiny capillaries that run through the fatty tissue. sometimes you will hit one of these blood vessels causing a bruise. it happens probably about 20% of the time for me. I pinch the fat and insert the needle on the side of the pinch. The legs and arms always bruise more often than the belly for us.
     
  5. jbmom1b2g

    jbmom1b2g Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2011
    Messages:
    277
    My dd's arms were covered in bruises from he shots. I agree it is really yard seeing your little ones going through this.
     
  6. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    Kind of an odd thing to worry about but....anyway...Bruising happens and if a teacher has an issue with it, once you explain that your child has diabetes and the bruising is from injections, that should not be an issue.

    It is probably not your technique that is causing the bruising. It is just something that occasionally happens, unfortunately. You want to be careful not to overuse the arms, there is less "real estate" there and it can get overused quickly. If your son does not like you using his legs what about his torso? Or his rear end?

    I would also suggest giving the long acting insulin in his rear end and not in the same place you give the short acting.

    I understand you are both new to this and it will take time to adjust but....at some point he is going to have to accept doing shots other places than his arms.
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    I don't think it's all that common to have bruising at the injection site. Perhaps once in a while but if it's happening all the time call your endo to discuss your tools and your technique. Get retrained if need be.

    Personally, I'd be more concerned that my injection method was causing my kid discomfort than worrying the children's services would see the bruising and initiate an investigation.
     
  8. Serenia

    Serenia Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2012
    Messages:
    56
    Yes that is true - child discomfort I mean.

    I think I better talk to the D-educator and have them look at my technique. Have both me and DS go and see her.

    DS has sensory issues and is extremely ticklish in other areas - especially his tummy and legs/thighs. Which is why we cant use the those areas. Not sure if he would agree to being stuck in his backside - especially if he has to sit down.

    We have had one run in with Child Services (which turned out to be a mis-construed report) and I really do not want another one. I hate that teachers have so much power to ruin parents and children lives. They are not even required to ask the parents first. No, they just see something, make an assumption (usually wrong) and call child services and then have our lives ruined as a result. This is why I am worried about the bruising.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2012
  9. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    Are you certain you are using the smallest gauge (higher number) and shortest needle possible?

    Instead of pen needles have you considered using syringes? You can draw the insulin out of the pen, so you can stick with what you have already bought, but we found the syringes to be much easier on everyone.

    Do you pinch the skin first? Wait a count of 5 or 10 before releasing the skin and release the skin before pulling the needle out (or, let the release of skin pull the needle out).

    It's tough to be the cause of bruising, but sometimes it does happen.
     
  10. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    I'd convince him to do the long acting in his backside, it has the best absorption there and tends to burn less.
     
  11. Jason's mom

    Jason's mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2012
    Messages:
    77
    Nancy - I have a special needs son on MDI. He doesn't complain about the pen injections but I've seen similar comments a couple of times. Can you tell me why the syringes were better?
     
  12. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    Hopefully Nancy will chime in but firstly, if your son is doing well on pens, I wouldn't change anything (in case you were considering). Secondly, I found pens to be a little "clunky" to handle, there was quite a bit of leackback so she was never getting the whole amount of insulin, and having to prime it everytime, just made syryinges a better option at this point. Whatever works for your family is what you should use.

    Hope that helps.
     
  13. Deal

    Deal Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2009
    Messages:
    557
    The pen that OP is using is not available in the US. I believe it to be better than syringes. I believed syringes to be better than the old pens. Occasional bruising occurs and there is really nothing you can do to prevent it. Just make sure you keep rotating the injection site to prevent developing lumps.
     
  14. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    I agree with Chris, if your son is not complaining or having difficulty I wouldn't make any changes.

    Pens are more convenient in a lot of ways, but I feel we can be more precise with syringes (using ones with 1/2 unit markings) and also avoid leakback. Pens seemed to hurt more as well, at least for my son.

    It's really personal preference, I wouldn't say one was better than the other, but when someone complains about one delivery system it's always good to educate on other options; so often people learn one way and aren't even informed of other choices. We weren't informed about 1/2 unit syringes...another T1 mom told me. So I like to take the opportunity to tell folks about other options when I can.

    I say if it isn't broken, don't fix it! If pens are working for your son, that's great, syringes aren't needed and pens are definitely easier in a lot of ways.
     
  15. C6H12O6

    C6H12O6 Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,451
    Why did the teacher call children's aid ?
     
  16. MamaC

    MamaC Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2006
    Messages:
    5,292
    Side note - call it a derailment if you wish - it's no picnic for a teacher to HAVE to report suspected or possible abuse...they can face charges if they fail to report. Usually wrong? Maybe. Small percentage of the time they are right? Potentially life saving.

    Off soapbox.
     
  17. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    This is a public forum. Anyone can google and read. This probably is not the type of info that you want hanging over your internet footprint for any and all to read...

    I would delete it.
     
  18. Tricia22

    Tricia22 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Messages:
    683
    I have found for me personally that I tend to jab the pen in more, and with syringes I can be a bit more... suave I guess would be an appropriate term. I'm not sure if it's the way I have to hold the pens with them being bigger and longer, and the syringes much smaller and narrower and easy to maneuver, but I tend to have an easier time with injecting with syringes versus pens.
    Another thing you may want to consider is getting an assitive injection device of some kind, such as the Inject-Ease
    http://www.amazon.com/Ambimed-Inject-ease®-Automatic-Injector-Injections/dp/B000PKYX8K
    Generally speaking, the quicker you insert the needle, the less pain and bruising.
    The Inject-Ease, or similar products automatically inject the needle for you with the push of a button - it's a spring loaded action, so very fast, and then you just have to push the plunger and pull the whole device back to remove the needle from the skin. This device also helps immensely when people have issues seeing the needle. This personally was a life saver when I was littler because I always wanted to do all my own shots, and this device made it easier to rotate sites and do shots without my parents having to help as much.
    ETA: Since the Inject-Ease is a spring loaded device and made of plastic, it can break or wear out with loads of use, so if this is something you try and your son ends up loving it, I'd recommend getting a back-up to keep on hand in case of breakage or losing one... I remember one breaking, and it took us SO long to find a replacement, and shots were harder during that interimtime before getting a new one... I was NOT a happy girl when my inject-ease broke... lol
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice