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How do you train your teen to do own night checks?

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by DsMom, Jan 18, 2012.

  1. DsMom

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    I'm just "visiting" the teen forum today...my son is only 7...but figure you all are the people to ask about this!

    I know we're nowhere close to this point now...but I keep wondering how you go about training your teen to do their own night checks. What worked for you/didn't work? Do you just have them set their alarm at the same time you set yours and then check to make sure they get up? Is there a point where you're trusting them completely and you're not getting up at all...or will you be checking as long as they live with you? At what age did you start having them do their own night checks?

    Just curious!:)
     
  2. nanhsot

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    For us it's a mix of all the above. When he has things fully up and running, he has his Dexcom connected to a bed shaker/alarm combo so he doesn't tend to set an alarm when that's operational. It rarely is though....:cool:

    Teenagers are a whole 'nother subject, we won't go through why the above is true.

    He sets an alarm if he wants to check during the night, but he asks me to wake up if he's truly concerned about some factor...if he's stubbornly high, strange lows, lots of exercise, change in regimen, etc. So he'll manage in a day to day way and ask me to step in when he's got a worry.

    During football season or illness he asks me to check fairly frequently. The rest of the time it is rare, maybe twice per month.

    How that translates to adulthood...not sure. We're pushing pretty hard at the seams of parental control/influence here right now so I'm probably not in the right frame of mind to discuss much more than that.
     
  3. VinceysMom

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    Most of what Nancy ^ says about teens! :p

    We are MDI... I set an alarm and I wake up to check him. When he is at friends homes, he is to set his phone alarm and his friends will set theirs too in case he doesnt hear his, etc. He is 15 1/2, since he struggles in school the more sleep he can get the better, and he generally doesnt wake up when I test him, only wakes up when I need him to eat/drink if he is low.
     
  4. KatieSue

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    We're a mix as well. If she's at a sleepover she'll set her alarm on her phone. Then text me with the number. When she's at my house I wake her to test, at her dads (we switch weeks) she sets the alarm and does it herself.

    We started out both waking her but per her request she does it herself at her Dads. And the rule is that's fine as long as the test happens, if it doesn't then we go back to the old way. The meter never lies :D
     
  5. Lee

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    This woman is living my life!
     
  6. DsMom

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    Thanks everyone. Sometimes, in the midst of slogging through the day to day stuff with a 7 year old with D, I suddenly realize I'll one day have a teenager with D!:eek: And that's a scary thought!

    For those of you whose kids have had this since early childhood...which have you found to be more difficult...child or teen? I know that BG during puberty is said to be a huge challenge, but I'm talking more lifestyle stuff. It's so hard to be my child's pancreas 24/7 and at times have pity parties for myself:eek:. But then I wonder if handing the reins over to my child one day will make things easier or harder for me. At least now I have some measure of control...the thought of handing this all over to my son (with ADHD to boot) and not knowing if he is testing or taking care of himself seems even scarier!
     
  7. Lee

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    Teen, definitely teen. They give you attitude everytime you ask if they bolused - and 9 times out of 10 they forget anyway.
     
  8. Timmy Mac

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    hey now, I don't forget THAT often...

    My parents never ask about my boluses anymore. The only time they really say anything to me about D is if I mention that my BG is way out of wack. (and as for the attitude, just because I have a high BG, doesn't mean I automatically forgot)
     
  9. Tigerlilly's mom

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    yup, teens!!!!!
     
  10. KatieSue

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    "I forgot I was diabetic" :cwds:
     
  11. MamaBear

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    I just realized a few days ago that my son will turn 13 this year!:eek: Sometimes he is waking himself to check right before my alarm goes off, and he'll meet me in the hall to tell me his number. He started doing that several months ago. Other times he sleeps and I check.

    Now the problem we have with him forgetting to check lately, is dinner time. He goes through all the trouble of weighing and measuring all of his food and writing down the carbs and adding it up, then just sits down to eat. And I say "and what was your blood sugar again?" and he says (with his cheeks full of food like a chipmunk) "ooooppsshhh". :rolleyes: I guess we'll have to work on that.
     
  12. nanhsot

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    Yup. My son NEVER forgets to bolus, but the scenario above is very very familiar. Testing is definitely our challenge, he's just too busy to take 30 seconds or he's STARVING and eats.

    Other big teen challenge is the constant eating so that you truly don't know what's up or down. No way to test daytime basal (or heck, nights either, he goes to bed at midnight, still eating...)

    I have quite a few teenage challenges swirling around right now so may start another thread actually.
     
  13. DsMom

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    Gee, sooo glad to hear that things will get worse!:rolleyes::p Not that I didn't have my suspicions anyway. Guess I'll "enjoy" my control while I have it!;)
     
  14. nanhsot

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    It's not just diabetes, it's everything. I'm thoroughly convinced it's all part of the process of preparing US for them to leave the nest and go on their own. Earlier this week I was contemplating graduating him early so he would just LEAVE NOW.

    Most of the time teens are amazing, interesting, engaging, wonderful almost adults. Really, I love teenagers. So don't let this thread scare you. But there are definite challenges that diabetes just makes more difficult. Right now we're dealing heavily with him wanting more independence in ALL of his life, being able to leave and us not know exactly where he is type thing. We are the ONLY parents who want to know where he is....:p HA.

    Toss in diabetes and it's just darn complicated. This week I let him do some stuff mid week and didn't really quiz him on details, but then he came home and didn't inform me that his pump QUIT working. Went to bed without informing. Crazy stuff like that. (and before anyone thinks he needs a tighter leash, he did inject with lantus to equal his normal basal, he wasn't stupid...just wish he'd informed me so I could do a night check).

    Had a heart to heart and he's back on track and seems to understand why we need to at least be minimally involved

    That's the good news, my teen is very responsible and logical, so a talk generally helps. He is just ready to be on his own, but he's in that in between stage, not yet an adult and not quite a child.

    Independence is both a blessing and a curse, in many many ways.

    edited to add: you still have a LONG ways for this, this push for independence has happened in his 17th year. He's had fits and spurts before, but not quite as dramatic as currently. 13-15 was lovely, 15-16 was iffy, 16 was wonderful again, 17 has been tough for the latter half. 18....well, that's coming up!
     
  15. DsMom

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    Yes, we do have a long way to go...I am a firm believer in worrying whenever possible, though!:rolleyes::p

    I have a 9 year old son who already acts like a teenager with the attitude, explosive sighs, and eye rolling...I definitely see how all that can make it easier to let them (or MAKE them) go!!

    Daniel (my son with D) said to me just last night before bed "Boy, I guess I'll have to learn all this (D) stuff one day" and wanted to know how long it took me to learn. Funny that he's been thinking about it the same time as I have! I tried to reassure him it would be easier for him because he can watch me and learn slowly...while I had to learn as fast as I could...and that he already knew so much already. He seemed so proud of all of the D facts that he could rattle off...so bittersweet.:(
     
  16. piratelight

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    This is our life too! H will be 13 in a few months!

     
  17. Tigerlilly's mom

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    I am seeing this ALOT lately....oooooppps forgot to check my bg...BUT he does remember to bolus for his food....but when you get a wacky high number you can't figure out was he high before he ate?, or was it the food?, underbolus?

    I figured this day was coming, but still am not prepared for it...I hate being a nag about his diabetes management....but it seems that I must nag for him to remember to test when he is not at home....

    We have implemented a new texting system that will hopefully help with him remembering to test without me being "too much" of a nag.
     
  18. bnmom

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    My son who used to wake me at 6am all peppy and ready for the day is now a hardcore teenager. He doesn't even wake up to his alarm clocks most school mornings (and he has 2 of them!) so I have no idea how I'll ever feel comfortable with him handling middle of the night checks on his own.

    He sleeps through me doing checks, and lately he's even sleeping through site changes. I don't know that a tornado would stir him anymore. So come college I guess I'll either bribe his roommates or sneak through the window myself at 3am. I'm hoping to figure out a good fix over the next couple years.

    And yessss Nancy on forgetting to check his bg! He has never forgotten to bolus (yet, knock wood) but getting him to do a bg check before eating is a challenge. He's gotten really bad about it the last month or so.

    Oh the teen years...my once darling boy is now a mixture of constant eating, endless sleeping, oodles of attitude and perpetual eye rolling (Becky I so love your description of Jess, cracks me up!)
     

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