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How do you teach your teen to wake up

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Lakeman, Nov 5, 2014.

  1. Lakeman

    Lakeman Approved members

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    My son is pretty new to this though he has watched his younger sister deal with T1D for a number of years now. Up until a week or so ago his numbers were very stable and he always moved toward normal - if he was high his numbers came down and if he was low they went up.

    But recently if he is high at night he stays high. He really dislikes being high but he sleeps right through dexcom alarms or me shaking him to try to wake him. If he does wake up I watch him treat himself and the next day he has little to no memory of it.

    Given that he is a young man I would like him to at some point learn to wake himself as needed to take care of highs and maybe even lows. On the other hand he is very new at all of this.

    How did any of you help your teens to wake as needed?
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I don't think you will find that there are many 14 year olds who wake up in the middle of the night to correct.
     
  3. Lakeman

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    Good to know the expectations. How about 15 yos? 16? 17?
     
  4. Beach bum

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    My daughter (almost 14) doesn't wake up (or bother to) for the Dex at home. But, when she goes to a friends house, or if my parents are watching them, she puts the Dex on the highest setting and wakes up.

    She also goes to D camp. In the cabin, she said hardly anyone wakes up for their Dex alarms. I think it's one of those baby steps situations. In order to go to a friends house, you have to respond to your alarms, in time, they will become a bit more attentive to the alarms. Right now, I'm OK with getting up for the alarms.
     
  5. KatieSue

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    Mine's 18. She sometimes woke to the dex alarms but she'd just snooze them. I kept it in my room and went and woke her if needed.

    She does wake up to test/treat. She was diagnosed at 13 so I can't sneak in and poke her she'd kill me. So I go in, turn on the lights, load the poker and strip in the meter and she tests. I have to watch what she does because a couple of times she's just hit buttons and randomly treated things. She rarely remembers the next morning.

    When she's been without me she does do fine. Sets alarms etc. She's in college but living at home for now and night testing is the one thing she'll let me help with, for now.
     
  6. Jordansmom

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    I didn't expect my teen to wake up on her own for lows, definitely not highs. As she got older she was responsible for more and more during the day. Night time was always my job. I always tried to make sure she woke up to a good number to start the day. Our routine was always to touch base as she went to bed. Kind of a hand off of diabetes care. What's been going on with bgs? Have you been unusually low or high, any IOB and what's your number now? That eventually was a quick text and was mostly to make sure she tested before bed. As she took on total independence during the day, it became the last hold out for her talking to me about her diabetes care.When she talked about living in the dorms at college, we started taking baby steps for her to take over nights during her senior year.

    We continued the quick check in. If she had a good reason to check herself that night, I'd ask her what she was going to do about it. An example would be "I was low a lot today and I have IOB." "What are you going to do tonight?' "I'd better set an alarm and check at 12?" "You have a lot of IOB. You might want to check earlier." I never told her that at first I got up and checked that she got up. I have to admit I did that for along time. Our conversations got shorter and less frequent as she got more reliable. If she didn't get up I looked at her Dex and if she was safe I never told her I had checked. If she wasn't I'd wake her up. She was never 100% reliable and I never expected her to be.

    But I have to be honest that I have never expected her to do anything about being high during the night. I always insisted on that before bed check so she could correct then if needed. But her priority for independence was just staying safe from extreme lows. I hate seeing her wake up with high bgs. But she has a lot going on and takes pretty good care of herself. I'm proud and impressed by what she does manage on her own. Its her burden to bear every day for the rest of her life and I don't expect her to be as vigilant as I was.

    The best that I felt I could do when she took over nights was to make sure her basals were as good as I could get them and confirm a before bed check and correction. Sometimes highs at night are caused by problem foods but if basals are really fine tuned, food happens.
     
  7. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    I'm curious about this as well. I'd like to know more about how the transition will work as they become young adults. My son is 14 1/2 and has had diabetes for 14 years. I take care of all the alarms at night. By in just a few short years he will be off to college. I can't imagine me doing 100% of the night checks and then sending him off to college expecting him to do 100% of the night checks. How and when do people make this transition
     
  8. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Mine is 16, almost 17 and a Junior. The plan is that starting in spring semester Senior year we'll transfer night custody of her dexcom from mom to Maddie. I think it will be up to her to set the thresholds she feels comfortable with. It wouldn't surprise me if she set the low at 80 and the high way up at 280. Maybe we'll put it in a glass, maybe we'll get the "Share" and let her phone wake her, I don't know but I figure we'll have 6 months to come up with something that works for her.

    I know that I have managed her diabetes over the years in my way and that as she heads off to college I'm going to have to stand back and let her devise her way of doing things.
     
  9. caspi

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    This is exactly our plan as well. For now if he's away from home overnight without me, he uses the earthquake app on his phone and it wakes him at night when the Dex vibrates.
     
  10. Lakeman

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    Interesting concept. Is the earthquake alarm louder than the Dex?
     
  11. Lakeman

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    So do you figure it will take about six months for her to learn to take care of nighttime stuff herself?
     
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Well, after 12 years she knows how to take care of herself at night, but given the pressures of school and sports and driving and college anxiety it just feels right for me to continue to give her a break overnight for as long as I can. At present, we generally discuss what were doing just before bed, setting a temp rate or correcting, checking IoB and calibrating the dexcom, etc., so nothing will be new except for getting accustomed to waking to the alarms and figuring out how aggressive she wants to be in treating at night.

    I figure 6 months will give her time to experience most possible scenarios. And too, we don't really know what the tech scene will look like in 2 years… but that's our basic plan.
     
  13. caspi

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  14. sugarmonkey

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    DS is nearly 18 and talking about moving away next year, so we've been working on him waking up himself. Not just for diabetes, but in the mornings too. He's a very heavy sleeper and never wakes up to any sort of alarm, so I'm more concerned about him waking up for work, since what he wants to do often means 4am starts. He does wake up to test overnight when he's not with me. I'll just have to hope that when he starts having to get up for work he does.
     
  15. sszyszkiewicz

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  16. GChick

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    I have a general question for the parents, but lets make some assumptions first to make the reason for my question a little more obvious. The assumption in my question is if your child did NOT have access to a CGM and were monitored by tests/feelings alone.

    OK, so... Do most of you guys ~really~ expect your kids to continue to do night checks on a virtually everyday basis once your child leaves the home for a (semi-)permanent basis?

    Do any of the other adults here (who do not have a cgm) do ~regular~ checks (even just "almost") every night?

    While its mostly 'cus I grew up in a slightly different time (though not that different), and as such, as a kid while my mom would most certainly check on me when she knew I had a "difficult" day (or even if she just had a "feeling"... she's psychic I tell ya), even on those difficult days a night blood test was rarely ever done, unless it was obvious "something wasn't right". Shed mostly just look at how I was sleeping and by that, determine if I was "OK"... but once again, really only on rough days.... and insulins back then weren't even as predictable (HA!) as they are now.

    I also know that night checks as an adult, have (/will) never be a part of my ritual (unless something extra peculiar is going on). I couldn't even imagine adding that to the rest of the daily stuff.

    So while it started out as a question to the parents, I guess its to both and because I rambled on a bit, I'll reiterate:

    As a Parent: Do you expect your child to continue night checks once out of your home?

    As an adult w/T1: Do you (fairly) consistently perform night checks on yourself?
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2014
  17. caspi

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    LOL very true! The Dex doesn't always wake my son (I have no trouble waking to it just on vibrate mode) but this definitely does!
     
  18. Lakeman

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    So I downloaded that to my phone today and yes I could see how that might be more effective. I'll show it to him later and see what he thinks.

    Other than that I noticed that after a few years of waking up in the middle of the night to do checks on my daughter I now wake up automatically. Assuming that these rhythms or habits cab be learned I have waked my son up each night at midnight for the last week - just to say hi"). And yes I do have his permission. He did wake more easily last night. Guess we will see where that goes.
     
  19. KatieSue

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    GChick - Mine's 18 now and won't wear her dexcom at this time, she got a bit burnt out on it. She does live at home but we don't check nightly, just if she's off at bedtime or has had a roller coaster day. If she were living away I wouldn't expect her to do any differently. She's wanting to take over all of her care right now and she has, I'm not super happy with the results so far but I've got to let her do it. Just hoping she gets it together sooner rather than later.

    I think it's unrealistic to think that as an adult she'd set alarms for every two hours or even once a night to check.
     
  20. Ali

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    GChick
    Adult here, using a CGMS. Prior to using a CGMS I set an alarm for around three am every night to wake up and check. If a rough day or screwy evening might check within a few hours of sleep and then decide if I needed another check. If I wanted to not wake up I had to just run much higher at night time, ie go to bed with no IOB and either eat an uncovered snack if at 100 at bedtime or start out at 150. It was brutal. As you know the killer of starting at 150 is you may wake up around 150 not ideal but workable or you hit 100 if you dropped or you wake up close to 200 if it's a night you go up. Made for very unpredictable mornings on my way to work or dealing with small children. Even with a pump and CGMS I still bounce around plenty day and night. For many of us there are just too many uncontrollable variables. Sorry:( Ali
     

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