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How do you prevent air bubbles?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by bbirdnuts@aol.com, Feb 19, 2010.

  1. bbirdnuts@aol.com

    bbirdnuts@aol.com Approved members

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    What do you do to prevent air bubbles in the syringe? When you pull air in the syringe to inject into the bottle, do you push the air into air space inside the bottle or do you push the air into the insuln. Do you do this while the bottle is sitting upright or upside down? Do you draw out extra insulin? Everyone does things differently and I wonder what steps you use to prevent air bubbles.

    I think I injected a bunch of air into the Pod tonight. Blood sugar before pod change was 91 and 107 after. Carolina cried tonight for the first time with a pod change and when I looked at the canula it was full of blood. Bolused her for a meal and gave 3.4u, blood did not clear but I saw it move. One and a half hours later 299 and went up more the next 15 mins. I was determined to get a good look at the canula of the deactivated pod and the new pod. This is quite a challange for me because I wear glasses for reading. Here I am with a flash light, a magnifying glass, and the strongest pair of reading glasses I have. I inspect them both for a long time. The new pod has a bunch and I mean a whole bunch of air bubbles that I can watch over time move down the canula into the skin. The old pod has no air bubbles. Blood sugar is now 211 and coming down, but I really messed up tonight and hope knowing how others draw up insulin can prevent this from happening. I am still seeing air bubbles.
     
  2. Christopher

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    I am not podding but here is what I do.

    First, I take the syringe and pull/push the plunger back and forth several times to loosen it up. Then I draw in air to the amount of insulin I am going to need. I then hold the insulin vial right side up, and stick the needle into the top. I then inject the air into the vial. Then I turn the vial upside down (letting go of the syringe) and gently flick the vial with my finger to dislodge any air bubbles. I then draw a unit or two more that the total amount of insulin I need. I remove the syringe, hold it with the needle pointing upward and gently flick it a few times to dislodge any air bubbles. Then I squirt the extra insulin out along with any air bubbles until I get to the amount of insulin I need to dose. Hope that made sense. :eek:
     
  3. Heather(CA)

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    Same here Chris! This is what I did with syringes too:D With the pod, the difference is that I whack the heck out of it with a sharpie pen to get the bubbles to go to the top, it also helps to make sure the insulin is warm enough. Room temp is not necc. warm enough in the winter. :D:D
     
  4. sooz

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    That sounds like what we do too. Then we insert it into the pod and squirt it in.
     
  5. danismom79

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    I don't try to remove the bubbles from the syringe by pushing back into the vial because I end up with far more bubbles in the vial. I push air into the vial, hold the plunger down while I tip both upside down, then let go of the plunger. I don't start drawing the plunger back manually until it stops on its own.

    My guess is that hitting the blood - and maybe the pain it caused - is what caused the highs.
     
  6. Darryl

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    The bleeding is not related to air bubbles, you were just unlucky that the cannula hit a small blood vessel under the skin.

    Whatever method you use to clear bubbles from the syringe, look through the syringe with a light in the background to be sure that all bubble have risen up to the black stopper before filling the pod. Stop filling as soon as the black stopper is almost fully depressed, to prevent and bubbles from entering the pod.
     
  7. thebestnest5

    thebestnest5 Approved members

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    Good suggestions. I fill our resevoirs very slowly and can usually fill a visually bubble-free resevoir--after I expell "fill bubble" that occurs.



    The 3 pods that I filled (not much)...I noticed the more slowly I filled the smaller the fill bubble was in the pod resevoir. It's not enough for me to make a definitive call on it.;) But, it appeared it might make a difference.
     
  8. Caldercup

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    I start by lubricating the cartridge with a few pulls up and down on the plunger, the I inject the air into the top of the right-side-up bottle. When I turn it over to draw in the insulin, I keep a finger on the plunger of the cartridge to control the speed with which it flows in -- the slower, the better for avoiding tiny bubbles.

    The one trick I learned from the trainer was to allow the needle to "dangle" from the vial and, with it just hanging there an inch over the table, I flick it a few times, letting it swing back and forth. (The needle stays in the rubber stopper, but I may have to push it up a little a time or two.) Eventually all the little bubbles coalesce into a large bubble at the very top of the needle. I push that back into the vial and re-draw more insulin, if needed.

    Good luck!
    Eileen
     
  9. bbirdnuts@aol.com

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    These are some great suggestions. Thanks to everyone.:):cwds::) I did have to change the pod because Carolina was having wacky numbers.
     
  10. linda

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    we were tought....
    1st to push and pull plunger a few times...

    then go to the increment on plunger of desired amount ..(i.e 200 units increment)

    stick needle into vial and turn UPSIDE DOWN and inject 200 units air into vial

    still UPSIDE DOWN pull insulin into vial (it should kind of stop itself at the correct increment

    still UPSIDE down tap (usually with butter knife or such) and you will see the bubbles rise to top...

    push bubbles back and again fill to desired line, repeat until all bubbles out,

    I have become good, 2nd nature at this process and can do with eyes closed lol....
     

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