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How do you explain the danger of highs?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Snowflake, Sep 19, 2016.

  1. Snowflake

    Snowflake Approved members

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    When we ask her what her highs feel like, my little joker always responds: "When I'm low I feel high, and when I'm high I feel low." This never fails to crack her up. I think it's great that she can poke a little fun at our fretting. :)

    But you raise a good point, Brenda. Afaik, she doesn't associate any particular feeling with highs. I think I will start gently asking her to pay attention to how her body feels when her bg spikes. Good suggestion!
     
  2. DylansMama

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    We never talked about long term complications with my son until he was 8 and started "forgetting" to bolus quite a bit. I used the analogy of a stone wall being like his body and each of the hypos are like taking a tiny chip out of the wall. One tiny chip here and there won't affect the wall, but over time, if we chip away at it enough, the wall isn't going to work the way that it is supposed to. While we can try to patch the holes, sometimes the holes get so big that they can't be patched without major work and, in any event, it will never be the same. Our kids have enough on their plate in terms of worry without knowing the details of complications.
     
  3. kim5798

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    My daughter got diabetes at age 3, so we had a lot of time for learning about diabetes. We had every children's book about diabetes that existed I think! Rather than scare the child, I think explaining what the pancreas/insulin does in your body is a better plan. A simplified explanation is probably best, but I seem to remember the books explaining that when you eat food, insulin is the "key" that opens the door so your body can use food for energy. Use diabetes as an opportunity to teach her how her body works. We always told our daughter that keeping the sugars in range, "kept her healthy." She will learn that being high feels bad, and that is something that if the numbers are high, you can say, "oh is your mouth dry?" "do you feel kinda yucky?" kind of things to help her realize/recognize the correlation.
     
  4. kim5798

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    I really like this & think it is a good approach.
     

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