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Honeymoon phase ending?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Artgirl, Sep 3, 2016.

  1. Artgirl

    Artgirl Approved members

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    Good day all,

    how long did your child's honeymoon phase last? My daughter was diagnosed 10 months ago and the first 9 months she was doing great and her numbers were always in range and often experiencing several lows a week. For the past month her numbers are always increasing with the same ratio of insulin. We are adjusting the ratio but it just seems harder to get this thing under control. I am pretty sure the honeymoon phase is ending and realizing that her sugar control is going to be harder as time goes on. She gets frustrated when her numbers are still high 2 hours post meal, her current ratio is 1 to 15, and its not working great, i feel like we are learning this all over again. How long did your child's phase last?

    Thank you
     
  2. wilf

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    The medical definition of the honeymoon phase is the period when your child's insulin needs are less than 0.5 insulin units per kg body weight per day. You can do the math and see where you're at.

    Honeymoons can last from a few weeks to several years, but some children don't have them at all. They can provide a nice respite after diagnosis in which you can catch your breath and learn how to best manage the diabetes. Sounds like your daughter's is ending.

    Our daughter's lasted more than a year. We could tell it was ending because it suddenly became much harder to manage the diabetes.
     
  3. rgcainmd

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    Some people find that T1D is actually easier to manage once the honeymoon ends because, in some respects, it is more predictable (as "predictable" as is possible with D, which isn't incredibly predictable due to random variables.)

    You can do this. Just keep reading. Try to learn something new about D every day.
     
  4. Artgirl

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    That's exactly how we feel Wilf, that the diabetes is suddenly getting harder to manage. The numbers are staying high no matter how much we adjust so i will have to call the Doctor she may need a very big adjustment. I hope her insulin has not gone bad but i doubt it, its not expired until 2018. A new learning curve!!
     
  5. scarral

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    I hadn't seen this definition of honeymoon
    "The medical definition of the honeymoon phase is the period when your child's insulin needs are less than 0.5 insulin units per kg body weight per day"

    We were told in yhe hospital that the ratio between bolus and basal insulin would tend towards 50% and 50% as honeymoon ended, he's now at about 60% bolus and 40% basal, he started at 70-30 just after diagnosis, but he's alway needed more than 0.5 IU per kg. I wonder if it's related to his C-Peptide having been 0.2 at diagnosis.

    In any case the changes we've seen over the past 10 months are that at some times of the day he starts to run consistently high, at which point we increase basal in small steps every day until one day the rise stops to happen. Having a CGM has been great to pin exactly from wheb to when he needs more insulin. Once it took one whole week of his BG risong from 100 to 300+ between 10pm and midnight before we got to the right basal dosage. If your child is consistently high at tje same time of the day it can only mean that he/she needs more insulin. Take small steps and test often.
     
  6. barbiduleny

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    I agree with that: our son Miles's honey moon ended 4/5 months after diagnosis and the end of his honeymoon was the most challenging, we constantly had to play catch up with high and lows and kept on being 'behind' in adjusting his basal and ratio in either direction. It was very unpredictable for a couple of months. Then the honey moon ended for good and that allowed us to tame the beast and get him much more stable in terms of BG. That transition period isn't fun, hang in there!
     
  7. wilf

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    In terms of making adjustments, you have to see what the nights are telling you. If she is going up over night then increase the Lantus. If nights are good, then adjust mealtime ratios to provide more insulin then.
     
  8. kail

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    My daughter was diagnosed at age 3. We were quite steady for about 11 months until she got sick and then things were a roller coaster for at least a month and then the same pattern occurred multiple times that winter. As soon as we regained a little control it changed again. Each time our total insulin went up. It probably didn't help that she was diagnosed with celiac just after our first year. In addition to the big bumps, we have had a gradual increase in insulin needs, sensitivity to carbs and decreased sensitivity to insulin as time passes and she slid out of honeymoon. Once her insulin ration was about .5 units to 40 carbs (1:80) where now we are 1:28. It can be a long gradual process as the honeymoon ends and not just a change from one day to the next. Even now, 2y, 10 months in from diagnosis we are just hovering right around the .5 units/kg/day total dose that officially is considered the definition of honeymoon. Some days we hit it and some days she is below. For awhile it was very frustrating as it just felt like she was getting worse and worse and harder and harder to manage. At least at our current point, I know that the awful times are mixed also with relatively stable times and I no longer feel like we are only getting worse. Hang in there.
     
  9. Lakeman

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    My daughter's lasted a month or two while my son is going strong over two years.
     
  10. andiej

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    Hi my sons' lasted pretty much 12 months to the day, when a virus hit followed by Xmas holidays, when he returned to school in September the increase in insulin requirements did not go down. I always dreaded the end of the honeymoon but actually not a lot changes in the daily management but we do find bigger swings,,,where as in honeymoon I would gasp at a 12....those times will now be 20!
     

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