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Hockey camp

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by shannong, Feb 13, 2014.

  1. shannong

    shannong Approved members

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    Hi there,

    I' m thinking about signing my son up for hockey camp. I'm not sure what to do with the Dexcom receiver while he is at camp. Carrying the receiver is too much for him under his hockey equipment. Plus even if he had it on him and an alarm went off, I think it would be difficult for him to pull it out (I have had to try to pull out his pump when he is fully dressed in hockey equipment and found it difficult).

    Should I ask one of the instructors to carry it for him?

    Also, when you send your child to short term programs, do you pretty much just cover the basics ie. treating lows? The camp is only half-days.
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

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    Well, I suppose it depends on the camp instructor's attitude and too, how you're using the dexcom data during camp. Can the transmitter be relied upon to communicate with the receiver? And if so, are you counting on the staff to respond to it? Or is it more a question of recording the data for pattern searching later? Your son is 8? Does he normally manage things at school?

    In other words I'm not sure ;-) It would really depend on what is practical, what is effective and what keeps your son happiest and safest.
     
  3. hawkeyegirl

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    At age 8, I wouldn't have sent him to a half-day athletic camp unless there was someone there who was fully-trained on D.
     
  4. cm4kelly

    cm4kelly Approved members

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    I would be a little apprehensive sending him too unless I could be there the whole time. Even though he has a CGM, all of the activity of hockey and excitement could really mess with his numbers. I think 8 would be a little young to send him on his own unless a specific adult was willing to be trained to help him.

    If he was a little older, I think it would be okay.
     
  5. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

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    Normally, I'd be one to say we can make this work. But, at age 8, I would need to know that there is a trained medical person on staff. Being that it's a hockey camp, I'd be concerned that the coach(es) would not be able to give 100% attention to your child. Honestly, the only way I would allow my child to do something like this is to go myself and be invisible (8 years in, I got pretty good at becoming invisible!). There is just so much activity involved with hockey, I'd be concerned with lows.

    My daughter first went unaccompanied to a camp without medical staff at age 10. Until then, I let her go, but let the staff know I was always nearby, or I even volunteered at a few.

    I know it stinks, a lot of other kids can go without even a thought. But, with diabetes it adds one more layer of thought.
     
  6. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

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    It appears that age 10 will be about right for us too, when it comes to things like going unaccompanied to camp. Maybe 11.
     
  7. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

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    It continues into the teen years as well.
     
  8. shannong

    shannong Approved members

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    I think you summed up all the questions that were milling around in my head! I suppose I just want the receiver near him so that I get the data, not for anyone to respond to it (well perhaps to low alarms but nothing else). My son manages his d care on his own at school (he calls me as well), but no one at the school gives support anymore. There has never been a time when he hasn't felt his low and usually he feels them way before the Dexcom alerts him. He also knows how to treat himself for a low, as this has happened many times at school. The camp runs half days on Saturdays for two months starting in March.

    My son loves hockey and plans to play next year with a high level team. He needs more ice time in order to do this. His coach is running a full day camp this summer but I don't like the idea of sending him all day. I liked the idea of this half day camp, once a week. Seems to be the most manageable thing to do. It is great to get feedback from other parents though and I will stay at the rink during the camp.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2014
  9. DavidN

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    Sounds like a good solution to me. And he sounds like a responsible little 8-year old. We did day camp last year when my son was 9. We had a couple counselors looking after him, reminding him to text BG numbers, and there was also a nurse on duty not far away. If you're going to be there full time then it's a no brainer. My son usually feels his lows, but when out running around doing what he loves, not so much. Hope your son has a blast.
     
  10. Deal

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    I usually let the counselors know what is going on, what to look for, and what to do. However, I always stick around and watch. I let them know that I might wave him off at some time during the session and they are always cooperative. I do find that hockey tends to push him high versus other sports like swimming that drives him low. I always have a bit extra insulin on board when the practice starts then watch for the drop once the activity ends.
     

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