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High school requirements with Type I?

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Gomod71, Oct 31, 2014.

  1. Gomod71

    Gomod71 Approved members

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    How much interaction does your teen have with the school nurse/school admin in regards to daily care?

    My son entered high school in September. For us there has been an enormous difference between what our old school and new school requires. Before, he had to report to nurse every time he tested his sugar or bolused (or supposed to anyway!). In high school he checked in the first week just so she knew he was alive and surviving, now no requirements.

    I am trying to offer constructive feedback to our old school. (Advocating for future Diabetes students) They put us through 7 years of headaches and micromanaging of this disease. State requirements in school don't change by age, so why the huge difference? In our case the two schools even have the same medical director!

    Just curious as to what your high schooler does.

    We are in Connecticut.

    TIA.
     
  2. mom24grlz

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    our high school goes by what the parents of the child and their endocrinologist want. Ashleigh's done her own diabetes management at school since the 6th grade. She's in 10th now. We keep extra supplies in the nurses office, so Ashleigh will go there if she needs something like low blood sugar supplies, test strips, pump supplies ect. She's also gone if she has a stubborn low and is having trouble getting it to come up. We have other type 1s that go to the nurse for all their blood sugar tests and anytime they need to take insulin.
     
  3. KatieSue

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    Mine was diagnosed the week before 8th grade so I only know about middle and high school. Both were pretty much whatever the parents/endo wanted. She started out 8th grade going in quite a bit, mostly because she'd just been diagnosed and we had no idea what we were doing. The nurse had 13 T1's in the school and knew more than we did at that point so she was a tremendous help. As she got more and more confident she went in less and less.

    High School she only went in if she had some sort of problem and needed to call me or needed backup supplies. I know there were other kids that had to come to test and bolus.
     
  4. BarbDwyer

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    My son is in 7th grade but nothing will change in high school. He reports his lunch time blood sugar number to the secretary (we don't have a nurse) and that is it.

    He is newly diagnosed so I'm not sure what they do for the elementary kids.
     
  5. wilf

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    We told DD's high school that she could manage the D, and they let her do so.

    She was allowed to test in class, and there was a stash of juice bottles available if she needed them.

    We never had an incident in 4 years.. :)
     
  6. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Hi Jen.

    We're also in CT. Maddie almost never sees the nurse. For the most part the nurse's office is just a convenient place to keep spare supplies in case she needs battery or a new cartridge or infusion set.

    I'm sure if we wanted for engagement we could have it, but the school has no set policy beyond what the individual student's medical management plan lays out.
     
  7. Gomod71

    Gomod71 Approved members

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    Thanks all for your responses! I had hoped that other schools would be similar to our high school.

    DS can use the nurse's office as a safe haven if he so chooses and all his extra supplies are there if he should need them. But after 7 years of this disease, he knows what he is doing and doesn't need anyone micromanaging his daily routine at school.

    Our old school became so difficult to deal with for everything involving his care. Even when we had our 504 mtg at the high school they shrugged off many of the items as common sense at their school, and complained our old 504 was very repetitive and redundant. I wanted to follow up with them to discuss things more constructively, especially since the same medical director oversees both schools!
     
  8. Megnyc

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    I had no interaction on a daily or even weekly basis with the school nurse. I had extra supplies in my locker and would have just run home during a free period if I needed insulin or anything I didn't have. We had an open campus from 7th grade (possibly earlier but I didn't go to the elementary school) and kids came from all over the city on subway/buses so we were expected to be pretty self sufficient. My school was publicly funded but run by a college so it was a bit different than a normal public school. There was one kid with diabetes in my grade though and he did go to the nurse for everything through senior year.
     

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