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High School and D...need some advice

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by 2type1s, Aug 12, 2010.

  1. zakksmom

    zakksmom Approved members

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    Zakk is independent at school- All the teachers and administration there know he is a diabetic. I send out an email to his teachers so he freely tests at his desk, eats, drinks, and slips out to the bathroom as needed. We text several times a day and this works great for both of us-
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2010
  2. momandwifeoftype1s

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  3. Heather(CA)

    Heather(CA) Approved members

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    Not to keep at this but as long as YOU know how she's doing. It's no one else's business at this point. She's independent;) You really don't have to send the report either. You can if you want to but.....It's not necessary.;):D:p
     
  4. timsma

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    Tim started handling his own D when he entered middle school. The nurse wanted him to check in daily, and we said no, he'd only do so if there was a problem. She finally had to relent and 'allow' it. It worked out just fine. In high school, the nurse said most of her kids with D don't come daily either, so there was no battle there for us then. I hope you can stick to your guns about this for your DD's sake. She sounds like she knows what to do and if it is good enough for you, the school will have to accept that.
     
  5. Mom of 15 yr old

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    our high school rules....

    Our high school requires all insulin shots are administered and stored in the nurses office. So our daughter has to go to her at lunch. She does all her testing and administrating independently. Although sometimes a pain - she loves the nurse and doesn't mind going in. She can test anywhere in the school - but the insulin dose - if not the pump - must be kept in her office. I don't mind at all. Gives me a little peace of mind - that someone else is looking at the numbers.
     
  6. 2type1s

    2type1s Approved members

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    Amy...she has the Dex, and a meter. She checks her Dex frequently, but only checks her sugar with the meter once to calibrate at school. All I do is look at the Dex when she gets home and say "good job"....or sometimes, "why'd you spike after lunch?"

    I guess I will have to have another talk with Debbie! She's just trying to do her job, and I love her, but Morgan doesn't need her anymore!
     
  7. CAGrandma

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    The endo thinks your daughter is capable of managing her day to day diabetes care (with, of course, adults to help if there is a problem).

    Your daughter thinks she is capable and willing to manage her day to day diabetes care.

    Do you think she is capable of managing her diabetes care? Not do you think she should report her numbers to the nurse everyday - but do you think she can manage during the day?

    My opinion? The nurse does not need to see her numbers. She is not the one to make changes - you or the endo are. She is not the one to see if your daughter is testing/bolusing when she should - you are.

    It is not fair to ask your daughter to be responsible for her own health, test frequently, always test before eating, PE, etc., count carbs, bolus when necessary, perhaps avoid certain foods that throw her numbers off - and then tell her she still has to go to the nurses office so someone can make sure she is doing what she said she did. I'd resent it, and I don't blame her for not wanting to do it.

    The compromise I'd suggest to the nurse is that you let her try it for awhile and see how it goes, and that you've made it clear to your daughter under what circumstances she must go to the nurses office.
     
  8. dqmomof3

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    Jayden doesn't visit the nurse unless there is a problem, and she is only going into the seventh grade. IMO, no nurse visits needed unless there is a problem!
     
  9. TerpSteph

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    Matt was diagnosed in the spring of his junior year. He did visit the nurse daily for the remainder of that school year, but he was handling things independently in his senior year. He only went to the nurse if he needed to replenish supplies. She did ask that he stop in and report any lows that he may have had, though he was free to test and treat anywhere in school.
     
  10. 2type1s

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    We are now officially independent!!! Yay!!! Nurse Debbie is fine with it, and though it took some convincing for the nurse over the county, she couldn't argue with the doctor's orders. We sent the Dex report for the first few weeks of school to prove she's not having any lows or highs that weren't managed. so.....happy teenager at my house! Thanks for all the help...I copied several posts to send to the nurses!
     
  11. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Congrats! Good job advocating for Morgan. I hope she shines brightly with her new independence!
     
  12. Heather(CA)

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    That's great! Way to go mom!:D
     
  13. Judith

    Judith Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    Checking in with the nurse

    Just one caveat re: your guidelines: If Morgan is "under 50" she should not have to go to the nurse; the nurse should come to her if needed. There should be a protocol in place for the nurse to be notified (by Morgan, by a teacher or friend) if she's that low. I assume she always has glucose tabs or other fast carb on her person. In any case, the nurse should be told immediately of any reading that low at school, even if Morgan is able to manage it herself. This is a protection for all concerned.

    Judith
    Mother of David, 24, diagnosed at age 8 weeks
    Pediatric nurse practitioner, certified in advanced diabetes management
     

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