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Help with Injections

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by snowdrop, Oct 18, 2017.

  1. snowdrop

    snowdrop New Member

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    My 2 year old daughter was recently diagnosed and I'm having issues with her squirming during insulin shots. Making is painful I'm sure and therefore becoming more and more reluctant. Any suggestions on how to make is easier for her?
     
  2. katerinas

    katerinas Approved members

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    Hi! Are you using the smallest ones 4mm 32G?
     
  3. MEVsmom

    MEVsmom Approved members

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    I don't know if this would help, and I am not sure what method you are using, but I find using a vial and a syringe much faster and easier than a pen. My daughter is much older and not squirmy, but I can give her an injection with a syringe in literally a second or two. I feel for you. I cannot imagine your struggle.
     
  4. Snowflake

    Snowflake Approved members

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    My daughter was dx-ed at age 2 also. We used distraction. For the first several weeks after diagnosis, we had a box of cartoon character sticker bandaids and we would have her focus on picking one out while we did the shot. We also sometimes used ipad or phone videos, which she otherwise wasn't allowed at that age. These both worked pretty well. Within a few weeks, we didn't even have to bother with either method; she just wanted to get it over with and back to playing.

    I would also talk to your pharmacist to make sure that you're using the smallest, finest needle that they stock. When we first filled our RXes, the pharmacy gave us a needle more suitable for an adult, which took us a few weeks to figure out. That made a big difference.
     
  5. snowdrop

    snowdrop New Member

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    Yes I am using the 32Gx4mm. Today I did use picking out stickers as a distraction which helped. We just got out of the hospital where she was at a point when someone walked in the room she started crying (because every time someone walked in the room she was getting poked either with testing blood or giving shot or messing with IV) and so now I think just the sight of the pen scares her more than anything. I just wanted to make sure I'm not doing something wrong. It seems crazy that they can take people with no medical experience, crash course them in a few hours and then send them home to be the new pancreas for their kid by stabbing them with a needle several times a day regardless of their experience with needles in the past (mine is none if you haven't guessed). Just questioning everything I'm doing right now. Want to make it as easy and painless for her as I can.
     
  6. Snowflake

    Snowflake Approved members

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    Good luck snowdrop! Those first weeks post-diagnosis with a toddler were the hardest few weeks of my life. I feel your pain.

    I hope you can find a good local parent support group. For a reassuring book with practical tips on this sort of question, a good place to start for the newly diagnosed parent is the Everything Parents Guide, which has great tips on day-to-day life with a T1d kid (there are a lot of excellent books on insulin management, but honestly I'd wait a couple of months, as I found them overwhelming early on):

    https://www.amazon.com/Everything-P...ords=the+everything+parents+guide+to+diabetes
     
  7. Ali

    Ali Approved members

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    I would also make sure you are using a super fine super good lancing device. There are huge differences in the devices out there. I hope other on this site can speak up about their current favorites.
     
  8. StacyMM

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  9. kim5798

    kim5798 Approved members

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    Distraction is key. Also do not talk about it before or build it up. She already KNOWS that food means insulin & a shot, trust me on this. When my daughter was small & knew dinner time was coming she would literally HIDE under a table. Be very matter of fact about the shots. Have it ready, say its time & just DO IT. A faster poke hurts less.

    I second the Inject Ease vote as well. Our endo office at the time poo-pooed that little piece of magic. So glad I ignored it & bought the thing anyway! It made things so much easier.
     
  10. cdninct

    cdninct Approved members

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    I agree with kim5798 about not talking about it or building up. Prepare everything out of sight, take it to her, do the injection, and then talk, cuddle, etc. For my son (also diagnosed at 2), it was the fear more than the discomfort. The less time he had to get fearful, the better. He'd be upset for the few seconds before the shot, then he was fine right afterwards. We'd talk about how it wasn't really so bad, then move on. Then, I started reminding him as I was getting ready to do, and doing, the shot, that he was always fine right away after it was done. One day, he put two and two together, and just stopped fussing about shots all together.

    Good luck--you'll get there!
     

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