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Help! Nausea when inserting Inset Infusion

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Mrs Puff, Feb 6, 2012.

  1. Mrs Puff

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    Ds 14 is going through pump training. Last Thursday the CDE was having trouble inserting the Inset Infusion set. After the third try my son was getting nauseous. We took a little break and had snack. On the fourth time it worked but my son thought he was going to puke and wanted it removed immediately. The adhesive was bothering him as well. He said it was because he sucked in his already thin stomach and then when he relaxed it was way too tight. Fast forward until today. We went back for more training. He inserted the Inset on his own and then the nausea hit again. He had to lie down on the floor again (gross, I know!). I told the CDE that we would do the insertion at home when he could be distracted by a computer game. He is supposed to go "live" with insulin next week. That is a little hard to do if he wont leave the stupid thing in! Any advice? The CDE suggested trying an arm site. He has never taken shots in the stomach, it has always been the arm or leg. I think he would like to use his stomach. He did say that the adhesive didn't bother him this time because he didn't suck in his gut.
     
  2. denise3099

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    Oh for pete's sake, why would she keep trying the same type if it isn't going in?! There are different types of sets and some that go right in with a quick snap like a rubber band. Why torture the poor kid? Start over, start fresh. Try a different set with a quick inserter, like a 90 degree, and go ahead and use an arm or thigh.

    Some ppl use the thigh and put the pump in their sock. :D
     
  3. Mrs Puff

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    What she failed to notice was that there was a tiny plastic tube that covers the needle. I saw it, but in my clueless state, I thought that was part of what would be "rammed" into his stomach. I must have nodded off during that part of the DVD that I watched at home. Today's insertion was flawless, but then nausea hit and he wanted it out. From day one he never had a problem checking his own blood or giving himself shots with an insulin pen. Maybe if it is somewhere where he can't see it...
     
  4. Beach bum

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    I can't believe the CDE didn't know the insets have a sterile protector over the needle. Your poor kid, nauseous from the stress of it.
    I hope things get better.
     
  5. Amy C.

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    This is incredible -- of the course the plastic cover hurts if inserted in the stomach.

    Insets are a 90 degree insertion device.
     
  6. Caldercup

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    While I think your experience was different because of the stress involved...

    I will say that my son sometimes has a wave of nausea come over him. We finally figured out that, for him, the smell of the Unisolve and IV Prep are the trigger. So, he sits down for the insertion and has a glass of cold water nearby to sip on.

    Also, if he's thin, have you tried putting the site on his "love handles" or the upper part of his butt? My son is very lean, and stomach sites aren't comfortable for him (though many lean kids use them just fine.)
     
  7. McKenna'smom

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    My DD got nauseous too when her first inset was put in. We didn't have any problems, I think it was just the shock and anticipation of not knowing what to expect pain wise. She quickly got over it and hasn't had a problem since.
     
  8. jcanolson

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    We have never used the stomach. Well...we have, but it has never gone well. Legs and bottom are our fav spots.

    Can't believe the trainer didn't know to remove the needle cover. I think I would talk with her supervisor, so she doesn't put anyone else through that. I'm not one to report someone for every little thing, but a trainer should know better.
     
  9. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    I was once injected with a 20 G needle and the pain of it made me nauseaus (it also left me unable to support weight on the leg for a few days). I would assume that with the plastic around the needle, it's as big as a 20G.
     
  10. emm142

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    Ugh. :( I can't believe that she would do that. I'm so sorry for your son, that must have really hurt. Honestly I'd probably do a bribe just for wearing one infusion set for a couple of days. In this case he did go through needless pain and he has a pretty darn good reason to be scared of the insertion, so I don't think that bribing with an ice cream or his favourite dinner or something like that could really do any harm. Might just give him an incentive to get over the initial nausea and realise it's not so bad. Possibly you could also try using the arms, legs or buttocks for sites if that's where he's used to getting shots, and you could try a different set (in particular one without a spring inserter).
     
  11. Mrs Puff

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    All is well now! Kinda... While I was in town he tried to insert one but the needle bent. He did not know where the spares were so when I got home I gave him one. He did fine and wore the pump with saline all evening. However, now he is griping about his lack of mobility. He is having trouble comprehending the benefits of the pump.
     
  12. emm142

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    This is why I'm not a fan of the saline trial.

    I'm sure he will comprehend the benefits of the pump when he is no longer having to take shots several times per day.
     
  13. Caldercup

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    Absolutely!!

    When he learns how much the pump will help him feel more "normal" in terms of eating, I'm confident he'll be a fan. When he sees that he can just look down, press a few buttons, and eat what and when he wants, he'll understand.

    At least that was my son's experience. Good luck!
     

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