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Help carb counting homemade yogurt, bread

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by olearyck, Sep 12, 2013.

  1. olearyck

    olearyck New Member

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    My daughter was diagnosed about a year and a half ago, and I'm just now getting back to the amount of cooking from scratch I did before diagnosis. At first it was just too easy to use foods where the carb total was right on the package rather than calculate from ingredients.

    I've started making my own yogurt again. It's not hard to add up the carbs in the ingredients, because I just use milk and a little yogurt as a starter. This tells me how many carbs are in the yogurt before incubation. However, during incubation some of the lactose (clearly a carb) is changed into lactic acid. Is lactic acid digested as a carb? If not, how can I best know how much has been converted? Obviously there is some trial and error involved, but there's a huge difference between 12 grams of carbs a cup and 4 grams of carbs a cup, as some on the internet seem to estimate carbs in homemade yogurt.

    Also, in baking homemade bread, I can calculate the carbs in the dough, but do the yeast convert any of the carbs into something that my daughter's body won't digest as a carb?

    If I strain the yogurt to make greek yogurt, I know that the whey has more carbs than the remaining yogurt, but how much?

    We calculate the carbs in my daughter's meal down to the nearest half gram because we do MDI with diluted insulin, so I do need to be relatively accurate.

    Thanks for any ideas.
     
  2. Mish

    Mish Approved members

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    For breads, a general rule of thumb is that carbs account for half the item's gram weight. So if your slice of bread weighs 30g, then it probably has very close to 15g of carbs.

    As for the yogurt, this article seems to suggest that there isn't much difference http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/10753/homemade-yogurt-nutrition-info

    And I totally get the diluted insulin and accuracy thing. It's really helpful to be able to dilute, but at the same time, you need to be accurate. Just know, eventually it will pass and someday you will be 5 or so grams off and it won't matter. Trust me on that. ;)
     
  3. C6H12O6

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    I am guessing the carb count on the homemade yogurt would be the same as the yogurt you use as a culture. You should try to use 2 percent plain yogurt as your culture and 2% milk as your milk.

    That should keep it consistent.

    Using Balkan style yogurt or Greek yogurt might mess things up. So stick to the yogurt labelled plain


    I asked a dietician about this issue and explained we used homogenized milk as out milk and 4 percent plain as our culture and she said the carb count would be the same as 4 percent plain yogurt
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2013
  4. cdninct

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    When I make yoghurt, I just calculate the carbs in the starting ingredients. It has always worked out fine for me. Ditto with the bread (which generally leaves me with a carb factor just a bit over 0.5, so consistent with what the PP wrote).

    I'd start with simple carb counts, then tweak your formula if necessary!
     
  5. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    I not sure this will be helpful, but, I would calculate carbs based on the recipe and then weigh the whole batch and come up with a carb factor.

    Then you the trial and error comes into play. I personally would start with the nstraight carb factor that you calculated and monitor bg accordingly. If bg is lower than expected calculate a new carb factor and try it the next time. When you get to one that works most of the time write it on your recipe.
     
  6. MomofSweetOne

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    I make homemade goat milk kefir, and I use the 10 g per cup that was listed on a bottle of purchased goat milk kefir from Whole Foods. It must be close enough because we haven't noticed a problem.
     
  7. Teacups

    Teacups Approved members

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    What I'd like to know is if any of you would share your yogurt making tips! The 2-3 times I tried the crockpot method (even using a thermometer for the initial increase of milk temp on the stove), my yogurt turned out very runny.

    I am not ready to invest in a yogurt machine as they have mixed reviews. So any help, tips, tricks for making a thicker yogurt would be appreciated! I ended up straining my yogurt to make yogurt cheese, but never used the whey. But I'd like to try again!
     
  8. cdninct

    cdninct Approved members

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    I have a yoghurt machine, but it really is just an incubator, and it doesn't help with the runny problem, so I almost always do it in a pot (and in the oven with the light on to keep the temperature constant). I generally try some combination of keeping it at 180 degrees for a half-hour before adding the culture, using whole milk, sometimes throwing some milk powder in, and leaving it to set for longer. You can strain it or add pectin/gelatin, too. Mostly, though, I have come to enjoy runnier yoghurt!
     
  9. C6H12O6

    C6H12O6 Approved members

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    The problem is that a lot of the carbs from the lactose is lost in the process
     
  10. Teacups

    Teacups Approved members

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    Okay... At least it's not just me. :D

    thanks!
     
  11. olearyck

    olearyck New Member

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    Thanks for the input. I will for now just use the value of the milk, and that should work fine as long as I don't incubate the yogurt to very firm/sour.

    I love how well a simple setup of an electric heating pad, a small cooler, and quart mason jars work to make yogurt!
     

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