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Hello, new here

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by suzannegardner, Jul 28, 2011.

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  1. suzannegardner

    suzannegardner New Member

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    My 10 yr old daughter was dx JAn, 2011. We have been at this for about 6 months and medically speaking things go well daily. She has learned to administer her own shots, count carbs and is very responsible. On the other hand she has become more dependent on me for her emotional support than ever. She has troubles with friends and will refuse to talk about her diabetes openly. I feel like she is falling deeper and deeper into a depression. She wants to be normal, her deffinition of normal, non-diabetic. An added bonus to this is that most peo around her although sympathetic to her needs do not see how vulnerble she is or the depression. Although she can be normal on the outside inside she is a time bomb waiting to blow. I understand all this and try to be sensitive to her needs but I can't always be there for her. How do you get the world around her to understand?
     
  2. Victoria!

    Victoria! Approved members

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    Hi Suzanne...Welcome.

    We were only recently diagnosed (May 27) however I know exactly what you are talking about. My 14YO daughter is experiencing much of the same. We have decided to go the pump/cgm route using the omnipod and dexcom so everything will be wireless/unobtrusive and she can manage it discreetly. As to getting others to understand, I think that is a long shot for the general populace, however her attitude will dictate how people react. Maybe talking to her about HOW she explains it to the other kids will help.

    Good luck and again, welcome to the forum!
     
  3. danielsmom

    danielsmom Approved members

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    Hi And Welcome...My son 10 Daniel was dx 7/11/11.. I'm still trying to get a grip on things...we haven't dealt with the friends issues yet...I've been open to telling his friends parents....I've been open to telling anyone who will listen as to educate them.. I don't want my son to be afraid of his disease.. I don't want in the future his friends to be afraid..I think it will really depend how my son handles it outwardly.. We've had quite a few crying moments...he feels better to be able to share his feelings of loss...he understands but doesn't understand....also we deal with his sadness through our faith...and we do a lot of prayer...I'm hoping his transition to school will be easy, as he was going to be moving to a new school this year...I am so terrified....I don't want him ever to feel less of a person or shunned....if it takes educating the whole school I will do that...At some point we will do the pump...I hear so much good about it.. But right now Daniel wants no control over shots, counting...etc....so for now he is a bit babied...but we're dealing one day at a time...I'm hoping you can get your daughter to open up her feelings or possible talk to a therapist...or put her in contact with other kids with D so she doesn't feel she exists alone with this..
     
  4. obtainedmist

    obtainedmist Approved members

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    Just some thoughts...does your endo's office have a psychologist who specializes in kids dealing with chronic issues? After dx we all had a session with the psychologist and it was really helpful. Would she feel okay posting to the kids section here? Would it be possible for her to do a Diabetes Camp (through the ADA I believe) so that she could meet other kids who are dealing with this? It is so common to have these ups and downs and melt downs. If you are becoming concerned about depression, though, I would try to get some professional help.
     
  5. suzannegardner

    suzannegardner New Member

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    Thanks everyone. I talked to the nurse at her school today and did learn that there is another child with D. This will be new for her to have a peer with D. I hope that will make a difference. I did approach her about gong to a D camp this summer and she was really negative on the other hand she wanted to go to a regular camp and she is overwhelmed trying to keep up and take care of herself. Next summer I really hope she will go to a D Camp. I think it would make such a tremedous difference in her self esteem. Thank you all for your comments.
     
  6. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

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    I would say she is taking on too much responsibility. Perhaps you should consider taking some of it back for you to do. Dealing with diabetes is tough and you don't need to do it all at age 10.
     
  7. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

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    Hi Suzanne and welcome:cwds: My son Steven is 10 1/2 and was diagnosed at age 3. He does not remember life before diabetes but of course your daughter does. Im sure she is still mourning the loss of that life that she had before. She is at that age where body image is starting to be very important and not being different is something that kids that age try to strive for.

    Is there anyone at her school that has type 1? Does she know that there are many famous people with type 1 diabetes like Nick Jonas and Crystal Bowersox (almost won American Idol) and so many others. There is a section on the forums for kids where she may be able to find a pen pal, someone who knows what its like to be a pre-adolescent diagnosed with type 1 and suddenly feeling different. Remind her please that we are all different in our own way and all special too:cwds:
     
  8. obtainedmist

    obtainedmist Approved members

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    One more thought...if you can swing it, you might want to consider going on the pump. I know that some people say that their kids don't want a constant reminder that they have D...but from our experience, it's just one more techno gadget that Molly keeps in her jean pocket and whips out. Instead of texting, she's bolusing! It did help her feel more confortable about giving herself insulin because it's more discrete. No one really even notices when she does it! In addition, she doesn't feel limited in what she wants to eat and she was always a huge grazer. With the MDI, she felt so regimented (we had to wait 3 hours between any dosing). For us, it was a real breakthrough to feeling more "normal"...and psychologically, it was a huge boost to her spirits. (That is, after we got through the 7 weeks of adjustment to the darn thing...the second week we wanted to throw it against the wall:eek:.)
     
  9. VinceysMom

    VinceysMom Approved members

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    This is my thought, too. Sorry to hear she is having a tough time. Good luck, I wish her well.

    Kathy
     

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