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Has T1D affected your child's sleep?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by DavidN, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. DavidN

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    Last night our son went to bed at 8:30 pm. He woke at 1:00am and was awake until 4:30am. This happens once a week and didn't happen pre-dx. I checked him at 2am (and found him awake) and BG was 202. I treated and at 4am he was 158.

    My wife has a theory she put into practice. She thinks it's caused by BG drops. Not lows, but drops. She'll give him a few carbs even with BG at 180 and swears it helps. I'm not convinced as some of his sleepless nights seem to have occurred when BG wasn't dropping, but maybe we missed it. I was willing to try anything last night so gave him a couple sips of apple juice at 4:20am and he finally went to sleep. Not sure if her theory worked or he was just exhausted.

    Anyone else have sleep issues?

    Any thoughts on giving a few carbs even if in mid to upper part of range to help sleep?

    Thanks.
     
  2. zoomom456

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    I do think diabetes can affect sleep, but how it does will probably be a YDMV thing. It was a change in sleep habit that helped diagnose my son. William was involved in a study from the time he was born that tracked his auto antibodies. At 12 months he had 3 and the team gave us a meter with instructions to test anytime something didn't seem right. All of a sudden at 13 months my son who always slept within 5 minutes of putting him down, would cry 20 minutes at bedtime. After a few nights of this my husband tested William. When we tested him he was at 232. Our son was diagnosed shortly after. We still have issues if his bg is over 180 at bedtime. He is restless and gets out of bed repeatedly if his bg is higher. When bg is in range he knows his routine and goes to sleep rather easily.
     
  3. StacyMM

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    When my daughter was diagnosed, it felt like she quit sleeping. At 2, she was sleeping 8 hours a night which was a drop from 10-11 hours previously. At 9, she's still a poor sleeper. Her natural bedtime is something like 11:00 - it doesn't work for us or school so she goes to bed earlier but she's typically awake until at least 10:00.

    DS has only had diabetes for a month. He went from falling asleep at 8:20 (5 mintues after his 8:15 bedtime) to not falling asleep until 9:30 or 10:00. He often wakes up at 10:30 or 11:00 but (so far) hasn't been hard to get back to sleep. He gets up at 6:00 for school and that loss of hours has been hard on him. I'm hoping it settles back down soon...but we're 6 years in with DD so I'm not hopeful.

    For us, numbers don't make a difference. It's like insulin is an anti-sleep drug. I agree with PP that said YDMV. Everyone is different but I wanted to share that we see similar issues.
     
  4. selketine

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    William sleeps more poorly when he is high (he also has to get up and pee). But low 200's wouldn't have bothered him like that generally.

    Have you had the thyroid checked? I had an overactive thyroid as a child and that routinely kept me up for 3 hours in the middle of the night.

    What if his bedtime was a bit later - like 9 - he is getting older so maybe going to bed so early is waking him up? Of course it depends on when he has to get up in the morning.
     
  5. DavidN

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    Yes, set up an endo appointment for next week. Both my wife and I have Hashimoto's so thyroid issues are possible. He's also lost a lot of weight lately (after he put it back on post dx) so we'll see. Thanks.
     
  6. selketine

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    I had the opposite - Hyperthyroid (Graves) and a goiter. I know the symptoms came on in full when I was in 6th grade but I had a racing heart, dry skin, and sleep problems and protruding eyes. Usually you lose weight - in 10% of cases you can gain weight and guess which percent I was in! And guess which side effect stayed with me - they don't call me bug eyes for nothing! Story of my life....:p

    Thyroid disease runs in my family (both hyper and hypo) so worth checking - I'd look of the symptoms of hyper to see if he has any other of those besides sleeplessness and weight loss. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001396/
     
  7. DavidN

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    Yes, hyper is what we are concerned about, but we are having a full work-up next week. Thanks.
     
  8. wilf

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    DD is a teen. She sleeps like a log.. :)

    I can measure any time, she doesn't remember that in the morning. After the first 2-3 hours of sleep she'll also happily give herself a bolus or eat a bowl of cereal to treat a pending low, and then crash back asleep when done.

    In this respect, life is good. :cwds:
     
  9. CaitlynGrisham

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    My diabetes has definitely affected my sleep. I notice a marked difference between sleep at good/normal bgs, lows, and highs. In fact, I know if I have a high bg because I'll wake up having had night terrors. If I have a low in the middle of the night, my dreams are much more vivid and exhausting, and I wake up feeling even more tired than before.

    I seem to require more sleep than I did before, also, but I don't really have much to compare it to in terms of my own sleeping habits; I was diagnosed when I was 5, so naturally I will need more sleep now anyway.
     
  10. khannen

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    My 9 yr old sleeps like a log typically. However, if BG is high.. over 200 or so...she is very restless and I hear her tossing and turning. She never wakes up with sudden big drops or lows.
     
  11. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Yes, probably. Perhaps more now than in the past but not in the way the OP describes.

    My bet would be on stress or anxiety based on what the OP wrote. Or maybe the new pod is somewhere that he lies on, maybe he's become more aware of the dangers of lows, maybe something totally unrelated in the environment has changed?
     
  12. Bigbluefrog

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    My daughter will wake up with a low BG, but not the highs.

    Since weightloss is also a symptom, I would agree to check for thyroid disease. Our Endo routinely checks for thyroid problems, appears that children with diabetes are more susceptible to thyroid disease and celiac.
     
  13. shannong

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    I think Diabetes definitely has an impact on sleep. My husband has been dealing with some health issues and so has not been able to get up in the night to help with night time blood checks of our son. I found I was exhausted, so our son just started sleeping in our bed to make it easier on me to test him at night. Anyway, despite the fact that I frequently test my son during the night, I have caught some unexpected lows because my son started tossing and turning with such frequency that it woke me up and I decided to test him. Now whenever he gets restless, I test him, and sure enough, I often find he is starting to go low. I think he may become more restless when his is running high too - but I'm not certain about that.
     
  14. DavidN

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    My initial thought was stress but after talking with him don't think so, but you never know. If the pod bothered him he'd definitely say something. Perhaps he's subconsciously worried about lows. Environment hasn't changed. But all good stuff to ponder.
     
  15. Jennifer126

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    My son is newly diagnosed and the more I read and hear I really really really think this has only been going on in his body since Early January! The thirst, the weight loss, the bathroom express..... I thought his bed time routine was messed up because of the water drinking and the new big boy bed.... then the hospital stay... now I am realizing it must be his BG!!!!!!!!!!!! It's so early and we are just starting to figure out the patterns.... I need my kids to be in bed by 8, now more than ever. It has been such a struggle. Hopefully soon we can figure it out because he goes to bed in the 200's and wakes up close to 100. He is supposed to be 150 during the day and 180 at night. Am I going to be testing through the night for the rest of my life? I went off on a tangent... sorry!
     
  16. Christopher

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    No, you won't be. You will only be testing throughout the night as long as your son is living with you. Once he moves out, HE is the one who will be testing at night the rest of his life.
     
  17. DavidN

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    The best way to keep your child safe at night is with night-time checks. Fortunately, by the time your child heads off to college, technology will be far enough along so that if used responsibly, he will not have to check himself at night.
     
  18. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Maybe. Maybe not.

    As for "responsible use"... is it irresponsible to not always have something attached to you? Something beeping at you? Something getting in the way of sports and sex and showering, etc? Forgive me, but I think it's a bit of a stretch to make such a statement.
     
  19. DavidN

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    Agree. Maybe. Maybe not. PP said OP child would have to check for the rest of life. I simply neutralized his pessimistic conviction with my optimistic conviction.

    If a poll were taken today, I'd guess over 50% of the active users on this board with D children over the age of 10 check their children at night. If a similar poll were taken 15 years from now, I'd bet a large amount of money that the "check at night" percentage would be under 50%.

    So my best guess is that her college age child will not be checking at night, but you are correct, maybe, maybe not.


    I suspect closed loop mfg's will have recommended user guidelines. Following those guidelines = responsible use. As for something beeping at you while having sex or playing sports, I'm sure you're making a great point but I'm missing it.
     
  20. Christopher

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    It may be pessimistic, but I think it is more realistic. I have "only" been doing this for about 6 years, but I have a hard time believing that people with diabetes will not have to check at night in only 10 years from now. Yes, technology is always advancing, but I see no signs of any device in the foreseeable future that will eliminate the need to check bg at night. If you know something I don't I would be interested in seeing what you have.

    People have been saying a cure is right around the corner for the past 30 years and so far I have seen nothing to make me feel it is going to happen in my lifetime. Yes, we have better tools, but even with something as great as a CGM, it still did not eliminate the need for finger prick checking of bg.
     

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