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Halloween???

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by Ti'sMom, Sep 26, 2012.

  1. Ti'sMom

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    Just wondering what everyone's thoughts are on letting my newly diagnosed T1D son go Trick-or-Treating. He's already feeling "different" from the rest of the world,so I don't want to have to take that away too. Anyone have any ideas of things to do or what to say when the time comes? I'd appreciate any help.


    Ti'sMom
     
  2. MelissaAL

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    My DD is 8 and was diagnosed last March so we haven't gone through the holiday season yet. Pre-diabetes, we would trick or treat with a group of friends. We'd let the kids have maybe 2 pieces of candy while out and then maybe a couple more at home, then save the rest for treats in lunches, after school, etc. So no huge candy gorge. I don't really see us changing our plan this year. Depending on her blood sugar, we will just give insulin for the candy she eats (unless she goes low from the walking and excitement)

    I'm not sure how old your son is, but I think it is important for D kids to get to do "normal" things and not feel so different.
     
  3. denise3099

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    You HAVE to let your kids trick or treat! No child should eat all their candy at once anyway so just portion out some and save the rest for desert and lows. My kids have peanut allergy and they still go. We just get rid of the peanut candy and I replace it with peanut free. and they are only allowed a couple of pieces that night on the road. Then the rest is dolled out over the next weeks.

    There's just NO reason not to go trick or treating b/c of D.
     
  4. obtainedmist

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    Get a great list of carbs by candy...your endo might have one and I'm sure there is a list here somewhere...anyone?? As others have said, as you probably had rules before about consumption levels...stick to those but dose accordingly. My daughter loves candy and her dx hasn't changed that...just what she does before she eats it! :)
     
  5. Christopher

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    In my opinion it is important to show him that diabetes is not going to stop him from doing things he enjoys doing. What I did was let my daughter go trick or treating, she ate a little candy during (all the walking helped), then when it was over she sorted out all her candy, picked what she wanted to eat right then (no limit, it is only once a year, have fun!!!), I figured out the carbs and gave her insulin to cover the carbs.

    Some years I would be dealing with highs later on that night, but my feeling is, so what. The enjoyment she got from doing it with her friends and not being restricted FAR outweighed the temporary high bg she had. Then, in the weeks afterward, she would pick a piece or two to have with meals and I would just add the carbs to the meals.

    Another way to handle the leftover candy is to do a "candy auction" where you would "bid" on the candy and they would collect the money in exchange for the candy.

    Here is a thread I found with good carb lists.

    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=45074&highlight=halloween+list
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2012
  6. heypb

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    With our little guy, our rule of thumb is: if it is something we would have let him do if he didn't have diabetes, then it is something he can do with diabetes.

    Then we'll find a way to make it work.
     
  7. zoomom456

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    We go trick or treating and dole out small amounts. Our kids each get to have 3 pieces of candy that night and they must be the snack size candies. We actually have some neighbors who get full size candy bars! Then they may have 2 pieces after dinner for 1 week. We then save some for lows and special occasions or treats. Anything left by Thanksgiving gets donated to the childrens hospital, after I select 2-3 favorites for myself:eek:.
     
  8. DsMom

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    Oh, absolutely let him go. My son was dx in September ('08), and so Halloween was on my mind right away too. That year, he went trick or treating as usual, then we let him pick out some of his favorite candy from his stash...maybe about 10 to 12 pieces, to keep. We "bought" the rest from him...and then he took the money and bought a special treat.

    He's 8 now (4 at dx), and we still do that...although we generally don't make him pick out his favorites anymore. He can have candy like everyone else and, when his siblings get a treat out of their stash, my CWD usually does, too. We just count the carbs and give him his insulin. So, he really gets the best of both worlds right now...candy AND a toy.:rolleyes: I'm shocked my older kids haven't caught on and complained about this yet!
     
  9. DsMom

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    I tried to donate my son's candy one year, and our local hospital wouldn't take it! Even though they have record of us being at that hospital and could verify my son has T1....guess they still couldn't risk me being a crazy candy poisoner.:rolleyes: Just wanted to do something nice for the kids stuck there for Halloween...:(
     
  10. Dan

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    I agree with what many of the other members have said...

    We never deprive Joshua of anything that the other kids can do. We will let him have a few treats during the collection and then every day we combine a treat with the meal and we have never seen an issue.
     
  11. caspi

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    When my son was dx'd, it was 3 weeks before Halloween so I know what you're going through. You're overwhelmed to begin with and the thought of all this extra candy is probably making your head spin, lol. That said, it's important that you keep things as normal as they were. So that means letting him go trick or treating! :) I honestly never liked Halloween, even before D, but the one thing I have found is that it's a great way to stockpile candy for lows, lol!!
     
  12. 3kidlets

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    This will be Hana's 3rd Halloween with D. It has never been an issue. She goes out with her friend. They hit about 100 houses! I know she isn't going to go low! I set an extended bolus on her pump for while they are out and she eats what she wants. She's not a big candy eater anyway. When they get home, they sort thru their candy and eat a few pieces which she boluses for.
    Usually by day 3, the candy is forgotten about.
     
  13. MissMadisonsMom

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    Let him go - If he's old enough to go with friends just ask him to hold off on eating until he gets home, if he's young, just go with him and let him enjoy every minute of it.

    Madison went with some friends right after she was diagnosed and we were concerned with lows -- so being funny, I made her costume by gluing the big rolls of Smarties all over her pants -- get it, Smartie Pants?? hehehe. I told her if she felt a little weird just grab a roll and munch away and we'd take care of dosing when she got back. It worked our really well. She had great numbers all night.

    We always give the kids 5 minutes to eat all the candy they can and then it's gone - they get a piece here and there in their lunches, but that's it. Last year my son chose a sucker :) It took him just about 5 minutes to eat it - silly boy.
     
  14. Beach bum

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    Let him go.

    Look at it this way, it's only one day a year, bg's can be corrected. In our experience, our daughter has always gone low because of the excitement and walking so eating 3 pieces of candy was in the noise. I would limit the candy he can have with friends to 2 or 3 pieces and then set up a plan with what to do with the rest. I let my kids each keep 15 pieces of candy, then I take the rest. We trade off with something small they may want. Then I take any of the candy that will work well for lows and stash them away, hubby then takes the rest to work.
     
  15. Flutterby

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    We'd never skip halloween because of T1. We use to let the kids pick their favorites, I'd pull the stuff for the lows and whatever was left the kids could 'buy' a toy at the store. We haven't done that in a few years though.

    This will be our 7th Halloween with T1, we trick or treat, the kids eat some candy while walking around (and well, they sneak more than we know, lol) and the rest gets put away, they have them for treats after a meal.. typically they forget about it even before they're done with what they got so I end up tossing it.
     
  16. lisanc

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    We absolutely go trick or treating every year! and every year, long before diabetes entered our lives ... I would buy my kid's candy from them or trade candy for item that they really wanted. They usually keep a couple of "good" pieces and they rest they "sell".

    It is a great deal for both of us :D
     
  17. mathcat

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    My son was diagnosed at the end of August at the age of 3, eight years ago. I still remember stressing about Halloween but I did take him trick or treating. I am glad I did and have done so every year since. He eats some candy that night and the rest just becomes dessert or other such treats for quite a while.

    On word of warning, my son went low while trick or treating the first few years. The extra activity and excitement seems to crash his insulin needs. Now I plan accordingly and either reduce his dinner insulin (dinner before trick or treating) or I let him have a few pieces of candy from trusted neighbors while out.
     
  18. Ti'sMom

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    Thanks so much everyone!! I was hoping that was gonna be the consensus!! Tristan was diagnosed August 21st and just turned 8 on Sept. 29th, so Halloween with his friends is still a really big deal!! He does great, but the hardest part for him is feeling "different" from his friends, so I didn't want to change our Halloween traditions. Thanks for making me feel like I'm getting this right! lol Ya'll are awesome, love this site! I've learned so much from all of you!!:)
     

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