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Going into high school?

Discussion in 'Teens' started by kinder23, Aug 9, 2012.

  1. kinder23

    kinder23 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    120
    Hi everybody! Well i was home schooled for the past two years during middle school but now im going to public high school. I talked to the nurse and we disscused everything and stuff and it was all good. They had just passed a law to let diabetics take their bg in the class room!:D So im happy about that! But i was wondering (this really has nothing to do with diabetes) but I have no classes with anyone of my friends except for chorus! And nobody I know (not even my friends friends!) Has 4th period lunch and so I don't have anyone. I am extremely sensitive (the slitest remark can make me cry) :mad: I dont mean to be but i just am and i cant find a way to help myself! I also have bad axiouty and i get bad panic attacks! I guess im asking how i can control my axiouty and my sensitvity? What should i do during lunch when schools start should i go sit anywhere or should i go sit next to some people who seem nice and ask if i could sit there for the day?:confused: (btw im very sorry about my bad spelling!)
    ps:school starts in 3 days!
     
  2. MissEmi

    MissEmi Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
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    Well, I have had some sensitivity issues in the past; I can be a rather sensitive person anyway, but it was compounded by a medication that I was taking. If I came to class and had forgotten about a quiz, discussion topic, etc, or if a teacher introduced something that even sounded stressful, it was all I could do to keep from breaking down in front of the whole class. Some things that helped me were deep breathing and concentrating on something, whether it was a nervous tic of my own, or studying something in the room. I know what you mean when you say you can't help yourself, there have been times when I would cry (at home, mostly), not because I wanted to, but just because I had to. It's hard to explain. Like, what happened didn't even really upset me, but it made me cry. In college, at least, I had the luxury of exiting the room, and I only broke down in front of people once, in the gym, doing my final fitness exam, but I think it was a combination of physical/psychological stress.

    I ended up getting off of the medication a week after the breakdown in the gym. The emotional side effects just weren't worth it anymore. I still cry pretty easily, but nothing like I used to. I've found that thinking of "ways out" or ways that the situation could turn into something good help.

    As for lunch, it's a good idea to act friendly during your first few classes and see if you can find someone with your lunch period, and ask if you can sit with them then. Maybe you can find another new student that is looking for someplace to sit. I went through a similar situation when I was placed in an almost completely 7th grade lunch my 8th grade year of middle school. I ended up asking some girls from my class if they minded me sitting with them, and I ended up sitting with them for the rest of the semester! I didn't make any lifelong friends or anything, but lunch passed quickly enough, and luckily, the library was open during lunch as well ;).

    Another story, when I was in college, my first year, I normally sat at lunch by myself, because I had to go on different days than my friends. One day, I saw a girl from my government class and sat down with her. After that, we ate lunch together pretty regularly, talking politics, as well as both of our statuses as chronic overachievers. Politically speaking, we had nothing in common, but we never argued, and had some great conversations. Sometimes finding someone different than you can be a good thing, so keep that in mind!
     

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