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Glucagon - have you ever used it an emergency?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by momof2greatkids, Jun 4, 2011.

  1. TheFormerLantusFiend

    TheFormerLantusFiend Approved members

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    Mini glucagon is when you mix up the glucagon the way the instructions say to, then use an insulin syringe to take out a smaller amount of glucagon. A mini glucagon injection is appropriate for somebody who is having a low that can't be treated orally, but who you know went low recently or is seizing or somewhat conscious.
    The bigger needle, regular dose, is needed if there is a reasonable chance that circulation is very restricted- then you really want the glucagon to go into muscle and not fat. I tell my parents if they find me in the morning and I won't wake up, go for the full dose. If I was giving myself glucagon because my stomach really hurt and I couldn't stand eating and my blood sugar was 25 or something, I would just use a mini glucagon.
     
  2. 3kidlets

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    I have not had to use it on Hana who has had D for about 15 months. She has gotten as low as 24 but was walking , taking, joking with her friend! Luckily, soda brought her up fast enough.

    My mother in law has told me that she has had to use it on my father in law several times. She has found him unconscious before. That scares me! I hope i Never experience that with Hana. I do know that he does not feel his lows (which Hana does). I have spoken with him about getting a CGM. I cannot believe his dr. has not told him about it considering he doesn't feel his lows. :eek:
     
  3. lakevictoria

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    Ditto that question for me!! Is it just giving half the dose???
     
  4. lilwitte

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    here is a reference to mini glocagon from the main website http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_0j_20w.htm hope it helps


     
  5. MrsBadshoe

    MrsBadshoe Super Moderator

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    Used 1/2 a dose before I knew about mini....she got sick has a dog for most of the day after. Used a mini glucogon once and it was perfect. Did the job and she didn't get sick like the prior time.
     
  6. swimmom

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    We've never had to use it.
     
  7. truck2ff

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    We're coming up on almost 2 yrs and have never used it on our ds, but our CDE has always had us keep it current. She's been T1 for 30 yrs and said she's never had to have it and has had few of her kids (she's great, we're going to miss her when she retires) need it, but she wants to make sure we understand how to use it just in case.

    I've assisted people and the ALS medics we run with at work, but we seldom see it given in the field. Usually IV access and then Dextrose. I think the medics prefer IV Dextrose over Glucagon for all of the issues that have been mentioned and the fact that they already have IV access for any other drugs or fluids if needed.

    The Dextrose is amazing to me how fast it works. Maybe a minute from being unresponsive to talking to us and refusing to be transported to the hospital. I've only ever seen Glucagon used when IV access was unsuccessful or we were at the edge of our coverage area with a delayed response from an ALS ambulance that can push IV drugs. Unfortunately, Glucagon isn't an option for most of the patients we run too, because they have a hard enough time keeping themselves in insulin and supplies, let alone an 80 or 100 dollar glucagon kit.
     
  8. Heather(CA)

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    I have not used it. :cwds:
     
  9. Melissata

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    You do not have to put the Glucagon into muscle! If you read the directions, it even says that there. They used to think that it had to go into muscle, but there is no reason to stick that huge needle into muscle when it works well with a smaller needle and not into muscle. Just do it like a regular shot.
     
  10. DsMom

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    Was not a dire emergency (no unconsciousness), but when my son had bad diarrhea for days last year, he was low for a couple of hours and nothing we gave him would make him come up above 50. Endo suggested the glucagon--so we used it. Was actually glad I had a chance to use it in a situation where he was not seizing or unconscious. Was scared he'd vomit, which he didn't--but it did work, getting BG up into the 200s. Hadn't given an injection in many months at that point, so I was more shaky than him and preparing the glucagon seems so complicated when you are scared and nervous!! Wish there was a way to store it already mixed and prepared.
     
  11. manda81

    manda81 Approved members

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    We have never used it, and I hope we never have to. We do keep it on hand though, just in case we ever do need it.
     
  12. kimmcannally

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  13. Caydens_Mommy

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    I have never used a glucagon on my son but have on my husband, in fact 2 in one night, and had the ambulance not gotten there when they did neither of those glucagons would have helped him.. Scary stuff, my DH also gets very combative when low, but he was passed out/seizing and I was able to get the glucagon in without a fight from him.. Now when the ambulance got there and they were trying to get him on the stretcher that was another store and a big fight.. Not fun..
     
  14. mom2ejca

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    We have never had to use it, but came very close one time on a car trip in Middle of Nowhere, PA, when dealing with car sickness/vomiting and a ton of IOB from lunch.
     
  15. tiger7lady

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    Glucagon is one of those things I make sure we always have on hand. If we didn't I'm sure we would have a situation where we needed it. It's just the way life is. Because we have it we are never going to need it. :rolleyes:
     
  16. Michelle'sMom

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    At dx, we were told to always keep it on hand, but mini glucagon dosing was never mentioned. Thankfully, I learned about it by reading CWD.

    I've had to use the mini-dose one time. We picked up dd at D camp last summer, on a Friday evening. We fought off lows that night & into the next day, under-bolusing all meals, giving several uncovered snacks & running a reduced basal. Things finally levelled out during the late afternoon on Saturday. I thought we were fine, but under-bolused dinner & continued the reduced basal just to be safe. I woke up at 3am Sunday for the normal BG check, & she was in the low 50s. I treated several times over the next hour & a half, & even disconnected the pump. She would come up 2 or 3 points, then drop again. When she hit the low 30s & wouldn't budge, I gave the mini-glucagon.
     
  17. lisab

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    I have used Glucagon a number times over the years.... in emergency situations when my daughter is 'very out of it', physically floppy and unable to swallow as well as when she has had seizures due to lows.

    I have also used the mini Glucagon numerous times for prolonged, stubborn lows and during illness with lows.and vomiting.

    I have always used an ordinary 30u syringe and keep a syringe in the kit at all times. I cannot imagine using the big whopping needle. We had been advised by our Endo that it is actually advisable to use an ordinary syringe on a child and that it doesn't need to be injected into muscle.
     

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