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Genetics: Will Your Child with Type 1 Have Children With Type 1?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by sooz, Nov 17, 2013.

  1. sooz

    sooz Approved members

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    I ran across this interesting article that explained the heredity factor for both type 1 and 2 diabetes and said in part:

    QUOTE:
    Type 1 Diabetes: Your Child's Risk (if you have type 1 Diabetes)

    In general, if you are a man with type 1 diabetes, the odds of your child developing diabetes are 1 in 17.

    If you are a woman with type 1 diabetes and your child was born before you were 25, your child's risk is 1 in 25; if your child was born after you turned 25, your child's risk is 1 in 100.

    Your child's risk is doubled if you developed diabetes before age 11. If both you and your partner have type 1 diabetes, the risk is between 1 in 10 and 1 in 4.

    There is an exception to these numbers. About 1 in every 7 people with type 1 diabetes has a condition called type 2 polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. In addition to having diabetes, these people also have thyroid disease and a poorly working adrenal gland. Some also have other immune system disorders. If you have this syndrome, your child's risk of getting the syndrome ? including type 1 diabetes ? is 1 in 2.

    Researchers are learning how to predict a person's odds of getting diabetes. For example, most whites with type 1 diabetes have genes called HLA-DR3 or HLA-DR4. If you and your child are white and share these genes, your child's risk is higher. (Suspect genes in other ethnic groups are less well studied. The HLA-DR7 gene may put African Americans at risk, and the HLA-DR9 gene may put Japanese at risk.)

    Other tests can also make your child's risk clearer. A special test that tells how the body responds to glucose can tell which school-aged children are most at risk.

    Another more expensive test can be done for children who have siblings with type 1 diabetes. This test measures antibodies to insulin, to islet cells in the pancreas, or to an enzyme called glutamic acid decarboxylase. High levels can indicate that a child has a higher risk of developing type 1 diabetes.

    You can read the whole article here:
    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/genetics-of-diabetes.html

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. pianoplayer4

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    Interesting that there is a higher risk for dads than moms... I've always wondered what the risk is for nieces and nephews, cause I feel like I hear a lot about aunts and uncles with nieces and nephews who all have d...
     
  3. StacyMM

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    Interesting. I had read it before because my daughter and I have talked about waiting to have kids until she was 25 to reduce the risk. At the time, though, I didn't have a son diagnosed so I hadn't paid much attention to the odds for men.

    I do think it's reassuring to see that the absolute worst odds, which includes one of them marrying another diabetic diagnosed before the age of 11 and then having children, is still only 1 in 2. If they marry non-Ds (which is statistically more likely), even my son's odds of having a T1 child is only 1 in 17.

    And, if they happen to be that "1" in the "1 in whatever", then I know that they will be awesome parents to the next generation of CWDs!

    Have you read the linked article on the Genetics of Diabetes? I'm adding it to my reading list. As the mom of two T1s in a family with no history of auto-immune disorders, I'm fascinated by the topic.
     
  4. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    I have a Type 1 friend who's had 3 births(4 kids) None of the kids have anyhealth issues at the present time.
     
  5. glko

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    Not trying to be a Debbie Downer, but my DH had no type 1 in his family 1 generation ago. His parents had 2 children, both developed type 1 by age 15. We went to genetic counseling before having children and were give the number of 1:12 as a risk, or 8%. We had 3 children and 2 of the 3 developed antibodies by age 10, our ds diagnosed with type 1 3 months ago and dd has impaired glucose tolerance and 2 antibodies, will likely be dxd in the next 1-2 years. Since our ds is an identical twin his brother has a 50:50 chance of type 1. So our "1 in 12 chance" may very well turn out to be 100% of our children getting type 1. As previously posted if you are the "1 in" it is not much consolation.
     
  6. missmakaliasmomma

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    I gotta say, I'm pretty much expecting a grand kid with T1 so when my daughter is much older, I will be talking to her about having kids and letting her know that there's a good chance one of her children might have some sort of autoimmune issue whether it's D or not. I'm worried that 1 of 2 things will happen...1- the guilt will be overwhelming or 2- she'll know exactly how to handle it and will just go with the flow.. hoping for the latter =)
     
  7. Ali

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    Well:cwds:I would expect to not have a Grandchild with T1. The odds lean that direction. For me As a T1 there is no guilt. When I was diagnosed and a few years later talked to my parents about the issue their reply was perfect. Did I enjoy life? Well Of course I really really enjoyed having been born. So I had kids with no worries about their health. I did adopt my third but that was for other reasons. By the way neither my kids nor any of my large number of nieces and nephews have T1, I come from a family of six kids. Of interest one sister has some T1 markers but never developed T1.:)Ali
     
  8. SarahKelly

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    I am a complete stats and science geek...however, let us not forget the guilt that goes into a parent with diabetes having a child with diabetes. So, no matter the number they, your child and their spouse, will need your utmost support. I know that the most cutting comments to TJ and I, when Isaac was diagnosed, had to do with how we "already knew what to do" and "it was no big deal because we were used to it already." Nothing could have been further from the truth.
    So, bring on the data, it's good stuff :)
    Just remember it with hugs instead if you do ever end up having a t1grandbaby as no amount of data provides comfort when it happens and a parent feels they are to blame. :D
     
  9. missmakaliasmomma

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    It could always be just a personality thing. I will always feel at least a little bit of guilt because of my daughter. Even though there's absolutely nothing I could've done, I still feel like it's my fault.

    =) I agree with you. Even if my husband or I had T1, no amount of knowledge could make me feel less guilty. No matter if you're used to it or not due to a spouse or any other relative, no one wants their child to have anything wrong with them and of course as parents, I think we blame ourselves a good amount of the time for ANYthing going wrong.
     
  10. 3kidlets

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    My father in law is Type 1. Neither my husband or my sister in law have Type 1 but my daughter does.
     
  11. Christopher

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    I agree about the guilt thing. I wish parents didn't feel guilty, and there is really is no reason to, but I know some of them do.

    I am not sure why sooz felt the need to post this information. Maybe she thought it was interesting or thought others might find it interesting. That's fine, but to me, I think information like this does more harm than good. This is why:

    If you already have a child with diabetes, it is too late and this will only add to any guilt that is felt.

    If you are a person with diabetes and you have a child that does not have diabetes, there is nothing you can do to stop it if they are destined to get it. So knowing they are at a supposed higher risk only will cause you (and your child) undue worry.

    If you are a person with diabetes and are considering having children, would the risk of your child having diabetes keep you from having a child? I don't know, but I would hope not. I know I would never consider NOT having my daughter in my life, regardless of diabetes or any other challenge. But I do understand to conceive or not is a very personal decision.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2013
  12. MomofSweetOne

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    When my daughter realized I felt guilty about her T1, she said something like "Are you crazy? Life is GOOD. I'm glad I'm alive!"

    By stats, my t1 sibling had a 1:2 chance of passing it on and didn't. My kid was breastfed for over a year to reduce her risks of getting T1 AND still got not only one but two autoimmune diseases. So much for odds!
     
  13. sooz

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    Christopher, I "felt the need" to post this because this is something that people worry about and I thought reading the facts might lessen some worry.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2013
  14. jbmom1b2g

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    I find this interesting also. Our endo even told me the about the odds of children having diabetes. Yes we cant prevent what our kids have, but if you have a family hx of diabetes you can be diligent in watching for signs and symptoms. Yes we are all here due to the fact that someone we love has diabetes. My BIL has 5 kids and he has t1D. I hope and pray that none of his kids get diagnosed.
     
  15. greenpalm

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    Yes, this is super important to remember. My DH had had D for 14 years when DD was diagnosed and a couple of my close mommy friend actually said things like that to me, "Well at least you two already know how to manage her." "It will be so much easier on your family than it would have been for our family." I was in so much pain and grieving so much for this horrible disease in my darling baby I was shocked that someone would say such a thing to me. Even if there are elements of it that I have come to realize are true. It's not the right thing to say to someone who's baby is in the hospital and very very sick. Don't tell them how lucky they are. Just hug them and tell them you care, that you are their friend and to let you know how you can help.


    I for one, was so glad to find this information, so I know that it can be helpful. I think it's great that Sooz posted it, because maybe there are folks like me who haven't stumbled upon it yet.

    My husband was diagnosed with diabetes at age 34, we were married, but it was before any of our kids were born. At the time he was dxd with type 2. However, he was underweight, and in fact lost a lot of weight just prior to his diagnosis. Everywhere we went, medical professionals would say, "oh you're one of the weird ones." Because they told him he was type 2, but I was never completely convinced. He just didn't fit the type 2 mold, but neither did he fit the type 1 mold. He managed with metformin for 7 years. Then, when my daughter was a year old, he landed in the hospital. He was there for 10 days, with low sodium levels, but no one could figure out what was wrong with him.

    I was exasperated. I was at home with three small children and he was stuck in the hospital, because they couldn't maintain his sodium levels outside of the hospital setting. He was getting IV saline to keep his sodium levels acceptable (our friends brought him a salt lick as a joke).

    Finally, via my research and suggested tests, they got an endocrinologist to test him and he was diagnosed with Addison's Disease.

    Fast Forward 5 years, and my daughter is now 6 and she was diagnosed with type 1. AFTER she was diagnosed I learn about LADA, and that the combination of LADA and Addison's is a type of Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome.

    That's when I figured out that all three of my kids have a 1 in 2 chance of developing type 1. My husband's endocrinologist, the one that was treating his diabetes, the one who tested for and found autoantibodies, and the Addison's disease both, NEVER told us how high our children's risk was.

    By the time we got our daughter into the ER she was in moderate DKA.

    now, if Sooz posting this reaches one extra person, who then understands how high their child's risk is, and that person then learns the warning signs for type 1, and that person catches it a day or a few hours sooner than I did, that's a good thing. That's a very good thing.

    Because kids who present in DKA are at a great risk for complications down the road, so preventing DKA at the time of diagnosis seems like a very noble goal. The way to prevent DKA at diagnosis is to know the warning signs like excessive thirst, excessive hunger, lethargy, and excessive trips to the bathroom. But I didn't even know my kids had a 1 in 2 chance of developing type 1.

    Now, with my boys, they are in TrialNet, they don't have autoantibodies at this time, but at least I can keep a closer eye on them, and maybe I can keep them from presenting in DKA if they are diagnosed, and if that reduces their risk of complications later in life then that is worth it.

    It really only takes one person with one fewer complication for that to be worth it. From where I sit, more information is always better.

    I wrote this blog post about my experience, and my anger at not knowing how high my kids' risk was:

    Little Ticking Time Bombs - LADA, Addisons, Vitamin D, and Trial Net
     
  16. Heather(CA)

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    The title of your thread is clear on what it's about...So, if someone wasn't interested, it's pretty simple.... Don't click on it.
     
  17. Christopher

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    I would be interested to see the research that proves that statement.
     
  18. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

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    I've seen several studies that show that people who are in profound DKA at diagnosis have more difficulty with blood glucose control, so there is good reason to catch type 1 as early as possible.
     
  19. Christopher

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    I don't think anyone is disagreeing that identifying diabetes early is a good thing. But there is a difference between making people aware of the signs/symptoms and of the potential risk statistics.

    Can you please site those studies, I have not heard that before about dka and long term bg control.

    I also think there is a difference between saying DKA causes great risk of long term complications and saying it makes it harder to manage bg levels.

    I don't want to hijack this thread so I will start a new one where you can post the studies.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2013
  20. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    This DKA business is also news to me. Are we saying that there is evidence that DKA at dx has lasting impact on day to day glycemic control over weeks? months? years? decades? As in there is some permanent damage to ... what? I'd also appreciate a link to studies of this.
     

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